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Author Topic: Logging Accident Reviews  (Read 27683 times)

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Offline OneWithWood

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #20 on: September 15, 2005, 11:02:38 am »
One With Wood
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Offline Kevin

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2005, 08:04:02 pm »
Dan, the definition of a chicot would be a dead, or partially dead, standing tree.

A snag would be the same but having a 45 degree angle.

A Dutchman is from having a saw kerf cut into the hinge area beyond the apex.

Offline beenthere

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2005, 08:16:46 pm »
A new word for me.
The google "define: chicot" came up with one definition and that was a Kentucky coffee tree.

http://wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=chicot


French word, possibly, that slips in there for snag. :)
south central Wisconsin
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Offline Kevin

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2005, 09:38:12 pm »

Offline Kevin

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #24 on: December 17, 2005, 08:39:00 pm »

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #25 on: December 18, 2005, 12:49:40 pm »
Logging injuries and fatalities are on the rise here too. The typical knee jerk reaction is to impose more rules but I believe more training over a longer period is needed to instill a safety attitude. I remember a heli- logging crew member saying "What are they going to do, take away my birthday?" when I pointed out a blatant infraction to him in a friendly manner. He was a know-it-all.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline Snag

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #26 on: August 30, 2006, 08:36:42 am »
These stories really make you think.  A couple years ago we had a tree company on one of our construction projects.  The company was owned by the individual that did all the felling and most of the other work to boot.  A giant of a man and as nice as he was big.  Every thing he did was calculated and done as safely as he could.  One Monday we returned to work and were informed that he had been killed over the weekend.  They were doing another job and the man's son found him dead.  The son, working in the vicinity, had lost sight of him and went to investigate when there was no response to his calls.  They dont know exactly what happened, but a 6" dia tree that he was dropping caught him in the back of the head/neck.   He was already gone when the son found him.  Sometimes I wonder if I should be dropping trees at all when something like that happens to a trained, experienced, professional.

Offline Raphael

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #27 on: September 06, 2006, 12:49:51 am »
These stories really make you think... <snip>...  Sometimes I wonder if I should be dropping trees at all when something like that happens to a trained, experienced, professional.
  I hear that!  As an under trained, experienced, semi-professional forums like this are invaluable to me but they sure make you think...

  The same week I finished reading all the posts here in Health and Safety my father decided that we needed to drop a red maple with significant rot in the base where a second stem once resided (I've got two pictures of the aftermath in my gallery).  Of course it leaned ~120 to only open space and he'd spent most of the morning rigging a line single that I only use doubled (it's getting much too old).  It was probably the most nervous I've ever been dropping a tree and I've dropped similiar or worse plenty of times...

  That evening I ordered a new " bull line, a new flip line, better harness w/ fall arrest straps, chaps, etc...
Only thing I forgot was a larger snatch block for the upgraded line.  ::)
... he was middle aged,
and the truth hit him like a man with no parachute.
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Offline sawguy21

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2006, 11:09:13 am »
This is an article re employees and employers liability. Food for thought.
Link to the report
Sorry for the long link, haven't figured out how to title them.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline Tom

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2006, 11:27:24 am »
It's easy, sawguy21, just click on the Globe icon just above the smilies.
extinct

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #30 on: September 15, 2006, 12:50:14 am »
Well now, I just learned sumpin :D Thanks Tom
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline rebocardo

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2007, 04:27:15 pm »
The one about the forester being trapped between his truck in drive and the metal gate must have been an awful slow death  :'(

Offline Phorester

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2007, 04:34:11 am »
Some interesting stats that came out of a recent meeting.  Recarbo, we also discussed the truck-against-the-gate accident. You never think that something so simple can be dangerous.  These figures are from a study at VA Tech and OSHA:

Cause of logging accidents by percent:

Falling Objects;    67%  (tree limbs, trees, logs falling off a truck while loading)

Equipment:          14     (other than chainsaws)

Other;                  13    (lightning, etc.)

Vehicles:               4

Chainsaws:            2   (1/2 of these came from a tree hitting a logger and knocking him into a saw)

Most accidents occured within 2 time periods;  10-11AM and 1-2PM.

Most accidents occured with two experience levels:  less than 5 years, more than 20 years.

Be careful out there gang.

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Offline sawguy21

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2007, 10:25:59 am »
Your last comment is telling. Helicopter pilots with between 600 and 1200 hours flying time get in the most trouble. Just enough time to get cocky and complacent. With any luck, they will scare themselves without wrecking anything.
I sell most saws to inexperienced urban dwellers and some downright scare me. I had an irate customer, a supposed arborist,  return one yesterday after the bar and chain fell off. He is convinced it is a design flaw and the saw, a Stihl MS200T, is inherently dangerous. He is not the sharpest chain in the box so I refunded his money, he really should leave tree work to someone else.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline Phorester

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #34 on: December 19, 2007, 07:09:20 am »

Same thing with forest fire accidents.  The experience level thing really hit home with me on that.  I've had over 30 years experience on fires, read all the safety stuff, study the accident reports, take the courses, teach the courses, etc. 

It was an eye opener to me last year when I discovered that I'm in one of the two groups that has the most accidents on fires.   :-[
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Offline Texas Ranger

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #35 on: January 08, 2008, 04:10:36 pm »
http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/invest/extra/P63405.asp

On-the-job accidents and homicides claimed the lives of 5,524 Americans last year, down 6.6% from 2001. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the workplace death rate is the lowest it has seen since recordkeeping began in 1992.

Of that 5,524, only 104 were timber-cutters, but those fatalities represent a death rate nearly 30 times that of a typical workplace. Loggers died at a rate of 117.8 per 100,000 workers, the BLS said, with most of them killed by falling trees. The death rate for American workplaces as a whole was 4 per 100,000. (That's among occupations with more than 30 fatalities in 2002 and more than 45,000 employed.)
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Offline Gary_C

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #36 on: February 11, 2008, 11:21:57 am »
Another logger dies under a tree. http://hometownsource.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3763

All it takes is one little miscalculation or moment of inattention, even at 60 years old and a lifetime as an independent logger.
Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Offline moosehunter

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #37 on: March 11, 2008, 01:58:23 pm »
 Odie is a friend of ours, one of my employees works with him on occation. We are all hoping he pulls through and can keep his leg. Read the story and you can tell what kind of guy he is, he is telling the rescue workers how to get him out!

http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080311/NEWS01/803110325/1002

mh
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Offline submarinesailor

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #38 on: March 11, 2008, 05:46:39 pm »
Moose,

Give him our best wishes.  Hope everything works out for him.

Bruce

Offline beenthere

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Re: Logging Accident Reviews
« Reply #39 on: September 22, 2008, 12:19:24 pm »
Logging accident in Wisconsin. Chainsaw stuck, so pulled on tree to free the saw, but the tree fell on the pickup and killed the man.

http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/28735559.html
south central Wisconsin
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