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Author Topic: big job dilemma  (Read 1527 times)

scouter Joe, Dave Shepard and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dirthawger

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big job dilemma
« on: December 04, 2017, 08:50:15 pm »
Im getting a sawmill at the beginning of the year.  ive asked the tree guys i grind stumps for to save me trees they don't want.  Well i got the call for 47 trees.  Now I'm thinking what do i do now, wasnt prepared for that much.  i got my 1 ton with 15ft trailer. 38mins one way.  Not sure how big they are,  he said the biggest is 24in in diameter. Id hate to turn it down,  that's a lot of money
 Any advice?

Offline Napoleon1

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2017, 09:06:35 pm »
What kind of mill are you getting? I'm close by you.

Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2017, 09:49:10 pm »
dirthawger,

   Congrats on the mill. Not sure what type you are getting. A 24" log would not be huge but would be a nice find/fit for my mill. Hope it works well for you too. Where are you storing the logs? If portable just center stack several piles and saw each pile in turn if you have the space. May want to separate by species and saw the more time sensitive and/or high value logs first. Some wood like locust, white oak and walnut will last a lot longer than others like pine or soft maple or such.

    Also that would let you experiment on low value wood till you have saw into the side supports and left the end roller up a few times and maybe even forget and leave the side supports down and roll one or two off the mill. Basically just paying your dues and passing the learning curve. Of course you won't want to do any of those mistakes until you have a big crowd watching. :D
Howard Green
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Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline TKehl

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2017, 09:50:30 pm »
Doesn't sound like it's all or nothing to me and I'm betting timeline is flexible unless being removed from a jobsite.  You may be saving them a chunk of $. 

First step is to sort the wheat from the chaff.  Just move the good* ones.  Then grab a load anytime you are over that way. 

*Good is subjective... :)
Lucas 6-13+slabber, Mr. Sawmill bandmill, orange chainsaws, JD SSL, Case Backhoe, farm tractors, trailers, and 150ish acres of trees.  Fledgling woodshop with CNC router, laser engraver, Woodmaster 712, and a Berlin 108 moulder (project).  Oh, and a lovely (patient) wife and four offbearers.

Offline dirthawger

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2017, 09:50:45 pm »
I was gonna probably start with a lt15 portable just to make sure ill get work for it then probably upgrade to the lt35. You have a proposition or advice to tackle this job? I don't want to short myself but i almost think I've put my foot in my mouth asking for something and then not being able to deliver. I mean it might well be worth hauling them all home, just didn't know if itd be worth it.

Offline dirthawger

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2017, 09:54:55 pm »
Yea im not sure what the timeline is. Its for a homeowner so not terribly time sensitive i don't think.  Its just the thought of hauling that many logs is a little intemidating but the thought of turning down that much wood makes my stomach turn. My plan was to just stack them on my property and cover with a tarp until ive purchased the mill.

Offline nativewolf

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2017, 10:24:19 pm »
don't cover with tarp.  You won't have too long to mill them being in the deep south, insects and fungus move in quickly.  I can't comment on the sawmill but it really matters what type of trees.  Are these pines?  Sweetgum?  etc.  Some you'd like, the sweetgums can be very tough.

How are you going to manipulate the logs, manual mill for 47 logs sounds like a big deal without the workflow, slabs, place to stack, etc.  Maybe see if a FF member is close by and strike a deal with them (someone with hydraulics  ;D )

Offline Resonator

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2017, 10:53:04 pm »
Like nativewolf says, find out what they have hardwood / softwood and how good the logs generally are (grade wise), and learn what will decay fastest. Take pictures and ask the forum if your not sure. Talk to a logger and see if it would be worth more to take some right to a commercial mill, and only keep some for yourself.

Quote: "I'd hate to turn it down, that's a lot of money." Log handling and saw milling is HARD work. Sometimes "free" is expensive. Remember, its not money until a buyer PAYS you for what you have. (Lumber, logs, etc.) My two pennies. Good luck!
"Chasing the sawdust dream..."

Online Kbeitz

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2017, 11:02:28 pm »
Just me but I️ would go for it.
Collector and builder of many things.
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Offline Chop Shop

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2017, 02:41:30 am »
That's only 5 trips with ten logs or ten trips with five logs.

When opportunity knocks, answer the door!

Free logs is how you pay for an experimental mill.

Offline TKehl

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2017, 07:31:06 am »
What would the tree service guy charge to move them?  One trip for him and one or two more with your rig...

Probably not a lot of log trucks in your area, but a dump truck can move a lot of logs as long as it can be loaded on site.
Lucas 6-13+slabber, Mr. Sawmill bandmill, orange chainsaws, JD SSL, Case Backhoe, farm tractors, trailers, and 150ish acres of trees.  Fledgling woodshop with CNC router, laser engraver, Woodmaster 712, and a Berlin 108 moulder (project).  Oh, and a lovely (patient) wife and four offbearers.

Offline YellowHammer

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2017, 08:38:43 am »
Congratulations on the mill.  Free trees and logs always sound better over the phone.  I would do a scouting trip, hook up the trailer and had over there with the intention of getting to know the tree guy and getting to know the trees he cuts.  Odds are many of the trees aren't worth hauling.  However, I'd get the good ones, anyway.

If you develop a good business relationship with the guy, then the odds are good you can pay him some cash and the next time he is cutting somewhere between you and him, he can arrange to bring the logs in his truck, probably a dumper, straight to you.  He will also know what kind of logs you want.  I've done that many times.   
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Offline YellowHammer

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2017, 08:39:06 am »
Also, if you can upgrade, get a 14,000 lb dump trailer, or as big as possible to keep you undef CDL limits, 26,000 lbs.  I used to get call from tree guys and would park my trailer at their job site and unhook it and go to work.  After work, I'd swing back by, it would be full of logs, I'd hook it up and drive home.  Minimal time wasted.
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Offline Magicman

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2017, 08:57:24 am »
My entire Cabin Addition project was done with free logs, most of which were already felled and bucked.  (I only had to fell two trees.)

When I am offered free logs and do not need the lumber myself, I call a couple of future customers and see if they need them.  They get the logs/lumber and I still get to do the sawing and get paid.
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Never allow your "need" to make money to exceed your "desire" to provide quality service.....The Magicman

Offline DanMc

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2017, 12:49:01 pm »
38mins one way.  Not sure how big they are,  he said the biggest is 24in in diameter. Id hate to turn it down,  that's a lot of money
 Any advice?

Here's my advice: 38 minutes is a pretty short drive.  Go look at them.  Just one look may answer all your questions.  The logs could be something quite valuable, or they could be a rotted knarly mess.  I will say this much for sure - 45 logs is a lot of milling, especially when you are learning, and even more so if you are occupied with a full-time job. 
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Offline Resonator

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2017, 01:26:31 pm »
quote "Well I got the call for 47 trees." How many LOGS are there in 47 TREES?
"Chasing the sawdust dream..."

Online ljohnsaw

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2017, 04:31:48 pm »
quote "Well I got the call for 47 trees." How many LOGS are there in 47 TREES?
Now, that is a good question!  My neighbor up at my cabin site had 5 trees taken down and asked if I wanted them:

 

Turns out it was twenty-two 12 to 13' logs from 14 to 28" diameter.  I loaded my flat bed trailer with my SkyTrak and rolled them off on my property.  It took me all day to move them about 1,000'.  I could only load 2 at a time (of the big guys) because my 2WD truck had trouble climbing a moon dust hill out of his yard.  He will have 3 more taken down and will have them bucked to a more suitable length (28' or so).
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

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Offline Stuart Caruk

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2017, 12:45:06 am »
Go look at the logs. If they are worth your time, call a self loading log truck and pay him to pick them up and drop them off at your site. Way less time and effort, for not a whole lot of money.
Stuart Caruk
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Offline PAmizerman

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Re: big job dilemma
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2017, 08:58:38 pm »
For about a year I took just about every free log I could get. All pine  and hemlock. Here is a pic of the resulthttp://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=0&pid=237413#top_display_media
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Traverse 6035 telehandler and a lot of back breaking work!!

Offline PAmizerman

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Traverse 6035 telehandler and a lot of back breaking work!!