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Author Topic: Too Heavy ??  (Read 2365 times)

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Offline fishfighter

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2017, 06:57:55 pm »
Lynn, I told myself I will never deal with a big one like that ever again. Takes so much time to saw one of those big boys. :o

If you do saw it. I would fell it. Seal the ends and put it to the side for a spring saw date. By that time the log could loose close to 1,000 pounds of water weight. ;D

Offline LaneC

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2017, 07:58:00 pm »
  This may sound stupid, but I have seen the following done on you tube(seriously).  Black powder! Seriously.  I want to try it bad.  I have seen them make a cut in the top center of a huge log, the depth of long bar (not sure of the length) with a chain saw. They then poured a pound of black powder in the slit, ran a fuse down to the powder, put sand and dirt over the top, light it and run!! It worked very nice on that huge log. One day I would love to try it. If no houses or anything is around, I would surely try it. It split it almost perfectly in half.
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Offline flatrock58

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2017, 08:21:33 pm »
Lynn,
Don't do it!  At least that is what I continually tell myself after i cut a big log.  Since I am older now I tend to forget that I should not do it any more.
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Offline ljmathias

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2017, 09:01:48 pm »
My experience with logs that big has been both positive and negative. I had a part of a very old yellow poplar that sadly was only about 5' long- neighbor didn't realize I had a mill and had someone haul most of the tree off. The section I got was too small for his friend to take. Long story short: after much chain saw whittling, I got the 44" diameter log onto the mill and started slicing it down. WOW! Some of the most beautiful dark colored wood I've ever seen and certainly some of the prettiest I've been able to work with. Made a desk and work table out of some and they are glorious. Lesson here: sometimes there's lumber inside the monster that makes it worthwhile. Besides, poplar is one of the easiest woods to saw there is.

Red oak, now, that's another matter. Heavy, yes, but if you can get the big boy on the mill and are actually able to begin making cuts, again WOW! Some of the most beautiful red oak I have came from a log that (again) I had to whittle down to get on the mill. Reminds me, I need to pull some of that- been drying a few years now and should be ready to make something with.

Now for the cons list. My son the plumber was working at a house out in the country (new construction plumbing) and said, "Dad, you might want to come and see his burn pile." Turns out he had a big excavator rip up some really old pecan trees: biggest was about 3' diameter. I managed to get some 5' long sections onto a trailer and hauled home; longer sections were too heavy for me to handle. Problem then was I'd left my backhoe out in the country and had no way to unload them. After a couple of hours of trying this and that, mainly involving my biggest tractor still here and several chains, I just chained one of the logs to a big pine tree near the mill and goosed my non-4-wheel-drive F150 as fast as it would go till I hit the end of the chain. Wham and Pow! Took several jerk-and-backup pulls before I finally got one off. In the process, tore the back lip off the trailer (ouch!). Got several loads this way (trailer was already busted, so why not?) and then the fun began.

If you've ever sawed pecan, you know it gives new meaning to the definition of a hard wood. Probably ate up a dozen blades over the course of a week sawing all those pecan logs. Mill went through them real, real slow but hey, cutting a full-throat log is putting a whole lot of friction on the blade even with lube.  Ended up with mostly 1 1/2" slabs that I planned to make furniture and counter tops with. Long story short: after air drying a couple years, I found an entirely brand new meaning for the "hard" in hardwood. Couln't sand the slabs (too wide for a planar) and couldn't do anything to smooth them down. To this day, I have a few dozen of these slabs waiting for me to buy a humongous planar that can handle them. Keep waiting, pecan, your day will come (or not).

Summary: big logs are a real pain to work, and can be dangerous even with good toys to move them around. Sometimes you get great lumber, and sometimes you get what would be great lumber if only you could figure out how to work it. Maybe a cutting torch? Maybe an asphalt road refinisher? Maybe a few young and stupid summer helpers who will work at the impossible for a while because they don't know what's impossible yet?

Life's challenges are what make it fun, so if you want to have lots of fun (and oft times get incredible lumber), go for the big logs everyone else is afraid to touch.

LJ
LT40, Long tractor with FEL and backhoe, lots of TF tools, beautiful wife of 50 years plus 4 kids, 5 grandsons AND TWO GRANDDAUGHTERS all healthy plus too many ideas and plans and not enough time and energy

Offline Southside logger

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2017, 09:59:54 pm »
I sawed a red oak a couple weeks back for a customer that was 32" on the small end and almost 40" at the butt, 16' long.  We ran a chalk line down the middle of the log and I handed him my 372 with a 24" bar - only because I was sawing other logs - it took him about 15 minutes without a ripping chain to cut down the log with the bar buried, done over a couple of passes.  We rolled the log and did the same, maybe another 10 - 15 minutes and the log was in two pieces right down the pith, which of course was split some horribly so it really did not waste any wood.  We put one half onto the mill at a time and I broke down those halves.  I cut some wide live edge pieces and quarter sawed some really beautiful wood.  I had no issues standing up or rolling a half log.   

 

 

 
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Offline Ianab

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2017, 10:05:28 pm »
I'd do it.  ;D

My little mill maxes out at 36", but as you can see I didn't move the log very far from the stump. Tractor could lift one end of the log to swing it around clear of the stump, and slip some bunks underneath, then set the mill up around it.

Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline kelLOGg

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #26 on: November 30, 2017, 07:33:24 am »
I halved a 34" water oak with my 20" Husky and doubt I will ever do it again with a small saw. Took 2.5 hrs. Great wood and worth the effort.
Bob
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Offline nativewolf

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2017, 07:39:15 am »
I'd do it.  ;D

My little mill maxes out at 36", but as you can see I didn't move the log very far from the stump. Tractor could lift one end of the log to swing it around clear of the stump, and slip some bunks underneath, then set the mill up around it.

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Those big logs are where the swing mills really shine.  Nice log.  Besides at that weight they are not going to shift too much so you can even mill short stuff.

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #28 on: November 30, 2017, 07:55:19 am »


If you've ever sawed pecan, you know it gives new meaning to the definition of a hard wood. Probably ate up a dozen blades over the course of a week sawing all those pecan logs. Mill went through them real, real slow but hey, cutting a full-throat log is putting a whole lot of friction on the blade even with lube.  Ended up with mostly 1 1/2" slabs that I planned to make furniture and counter tops with. Long story short: after air drying a couple years, I found an entirely brand new meaning for the "hard" in hardwood. Couln't sand the slabs (too wide for a planar) and couldn't do anything to smooth them down. To this day, I have a few dozen of these slabs waiting for me to buy a humongous planar that can handle them. Keep waiting, pecan, your day will come (or not).



LJ

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Online John S

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #29 on: November 30, 2017, 07:57:10 am »
If I'm not mistaken, I believe the mill is rated for a load of 4400lbs.  I would not risk my investment, but that's just me.
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Offline WDH

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #30 on: November 30, 2017, 07:57:44 am »
The really big ones just tear stuff up. 
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Offline LaneC

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2017, 08:34:36 pm »
BOOOOM. Blow it in half. I think a pound of ffff powder is 20 something dollars. Go to you tube and type in" blowing log in half with gunpowder." I have some cannon fuse if you need any. Matter of fact, I have some powder too. Let me know if you want to try it.
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Offline dgdrls

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #32 on: November 30, 2017, 09:19:11 pm »
I'd do it.  ;D

My little mill maxes out at 36", but as you can see I didn't move the log very far from the stump. Tractor could lift one end of the log to swing it around clear of the stump, and slip some bunks underneath, then set the mill up around it.

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

x2   swingmill ;)

Offline ljmathias

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #33 on: November 30, 2017, 10:00:46 pm »
Kbeitz: thanks for the idea on router planes. Great for making grooves and fixing/smoothing dado cuts. Not sure how a hand-drawn groove cutter helps make pecan flat- maybe there's something I'm missing?

Interesting development regarding pecan. I decided to build an end-table to put my books, computer, phone and "stuff" on next to the couch I usually work on. Explored my stacks of dry wood, some 5-6 years drying, some since Katrina. Found some light weight yellow poplar I forgot I had- just the right width to double up for the table. Planed them and measured one board at 12 feet =  enough for all the shelves ranging from 12" to 22" to 36" so that's great. Had another piece I thought was also poplar- color about the same but t little darker. Planar smoothed it nice so I cut it into thirds to make the legs. When I started screwing it all together I realized my mistake: pecan! Ouch. Too late in the day to find another poplar board so decided to muscle through. Broke off several screw heads and one drill bit, stripped three drive bits but finally was able to set screws (most of the way anyway) with enormous effort pushing as hard as I could so the driver would keep spinning the screw and not just the bit rounding out the screw head. Whew, what a job. Finally got it finished and only took me about twice as long as it would have with all poplar boards. Good news: those pecan legs will never split or give in any way, locked in with multiple screws held tight by the hardest wood I have access to...

BTW, you all probably know this but pecan is the outcast brother of the outcast hardwood hickory. Make beautiful furniture if you have the right tools and your hands and arms don't fall off. Mine almost did, and I'm sitting here aching from the effort and trying to figure out why I didn't just pull another board.  >:(

LJ
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Offline Southside logger

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #34 on: November 30, 2017, 10:09:58 pm »
ljmathias,

Guys will use a router plane, think end mill for wood, set the bowed slab up so it won't move, then put a frame around the slab.  That frame serves to hold a sled in which the router rides both across and along the board.  The router bit is below the sled and comes in contact with the wood, depth is controlled via the router plunge depth.  Then you make passes back and forth over the slab removing material as you go.  In reality you are surfacing the material not planing it, but the end result is the same.

If you set up your slab right, off set the high and low points, and have enough material to work with you can end up with a flat surface when it's all said and done. There are videos on youtube showing guys doing this.
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Offline Ianab

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #35 on: November 30, 2017, 10:21:01 pm »
A better description is a "Router Bridge".  The plunge router is mounted on a "Bridge" of some sort, so it can be moved back and forth above the board. As long as your rails are straight and parallel, everything over a certain level gets skimmed off, leaving a perfectly level surface that just needs a bit of sanding.

They can be varying sizes and complexity, This is my rig on the frame of my old mill.

v





You don't need that fancy, lots are made simply from plywood with the router sliding in a U shape bridge. Just it was the easiest option for me as the rails / height adjust / carriage etc were already there.  The swing blade mills even have the option of a "planer head" that replaces the blade with an oversize "router bit". Gives you a ~20 hp "router bridge for cleaning up slabs even faster.
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Offline Magicman

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #36 on: November 30, 2017, 10:37:22 pm »
My option is still two weeks away, but if I can get it, Iím gonna saw it.  Iíll jump butt it to get rid of the butt swell and let him load it onto the sawmill.  I will not split it nor buck it shorter.  It will all be sawn into 16í 2X8ís for my own use.
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Offline paul case

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #37 on: November 30, 2017, 11:03:53 pm »
bridge repair material for at the tree farm?

PC
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #38 on: November 30, 2017, 11:45:03 pm »
They now sell a face cutting router bit with replaceable knifes for this job.

link
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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Too Heavy ??
« Reply #39 on: December 01, 2017, 12:02:08 am »
Not sure how this topic morphed into router sleds, but here is mine.  Capacity is about 50" x 90":

 

Made it using angle iron and sliding glass door wheels.
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