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Author Topic: Can anyone identify this machine?  (Read 1978 times)

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Offline mike_belben

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #20 on: November 23, 2017, 08:21:45 am »
Well, we dont get to see it very well but youll notice there is hardly a forked or branched tree in sight, theyre all straight and tall.  The size distribution is great.  Prime trees ready to be harvested, great looking mid sized stock eager to fill in the holes and clear lower canopy that isnt all choked in with vines, bushy scrub or deadfall.  When a canopy tree is removed the new sun will stimulate new seedlings there which will have a chance to grow, not be smothered by the shade tolerate bushy ground stuff. Theres nothing leaned over into mcdonalds arches, or tangled in ivy.  The spacing is great, room to fell the big stuff but still tight enough to keep trees growing upward instead of outward. 

Its basically what successive generations of great management look like.  Here where i am trying to repair high grading, if i were to cut every junky tree in one wave i would be left with a field and maybe 3 straight trees per acre which would either bush out or blow over immediately after.  And thats starting in a harwood stick farm thats too tight to drive a quad through without a saw.  The junky oak/hickory/maple/poplar that was too small or poor to harvest makes up the crown, the mid story is slow growing shade intolerant hardwoods that couldnt get to the canopy in time before it started to die, and the understory is a shrub thicket of shade tolerant species that grow 5 to 10x faster than the hardwoods im trying to favor.   The sourwood coppice sprouts i cut this time last year are up to 9ft high now.  There isnt an oak or hickory sprout thats made knee height yet.   So im growing a spike forest of sourwood coppice to make a sidelight curtain for oaks and hickory between them. Eventually i will cull the sourwood.


Anyway im beating a dead horse,  3 cuts of high grade on the same lot will leave behind a disaster that would do better to grow hay.  It wont see a timber paycheck in a lifetime of hard repair work.  I am describing the typical unmanaged overharvested middle tennessee forest.  Yet ive been on two here that look like the one in the video.  Only difference is the owners management.  Best and worst practice side by side will really open your eyes.

Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2017, 09:20:29 pm »
Exactly!

That is why in Europe every newer skidder has a crane mounted in the back of it. surely ten times more versatile than a "normal style" skidder with just the winch and front blade.

i liked this video, excellent operator, he knows were the strong points of his machine are

Out here swinging grapple track skidder and wheel skidder were pretty common for clear cuts as well as thinning, most common was the 527 cat track skidder.

Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2017, 10:05:01 pm »
Out here swinging grapple track skidder and wheel skidder were pretty common for clear cuts as well as thinning, most common was the 527 cat track skidder.
Please update your profile.  ;) Where is "out here"?
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 38" cut Bandmill up to 64' - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2017, 10:15:46 pm »
Out here swinging grapple track skidder and wheel skidder were pretty common for clear cuts as well as thinning, most common was the 527 cat track skidder.
Please update your profile.  ;) Where is "out here"?
Sorry about that I'm out in NW I thin for Weyerhauser so we see the clear cut crews a lot, then we do long log thins we have a high track skidder for the application.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2017, 04:06:39 am »
High track dozer?

Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2017, 07:23:55 am »
High track dozer?
No a dozer the sprocket isn't centered like the high track skidders are also they don't have the belly clearance. Here's a 527 swinger

Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #26 on: November 29, 2017, 07:37:42 am »
 

 

Online barbender

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #27 on: November 29, 2017, 07:57:56 am »
I've watched a few videos of those 527's skidding, that looks like a real long day bouncing around in one of those.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #28 on: November 29, 2017, 09:13:09 am »
I've watched a few videos of those 527's skidding, that looks like a real long day bouncing around in one of those.
Honestly they aren't that bad in the seat it also depends on the operator as well as who's cutting ahead of the yarding just like CTL running a forwarder.

 
Typically how I would set up a long log thin with a forwarder for pulp.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #29 on: November 29, 2017, 10:16:36 am »
Ive always been curious about those.  What are the tracked machines strengths over a wheeled one?  Are these logs getting dragged from the harvester bunching to the truck with it?  How long of a skid?

Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2017, 10:59:29 am »
Ive always been curious about those.  What are the tracked machines strengths over a wheeled one?  Are these logs getting dragged from the harvester bunching to the truck with it?  How long of a skid?
Typically ground pressure, you can side hill some, as well as run much steeper ground a few local guys are tethering with a tigercat bogie skidder then another is tethering with a 527. When we thin with ours some of the skids are 1/2 mile so 2500 ft or so that's where a wheel skidder would shine.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2017, 12:38:59 pm »
Is the swing dozer also tasked with building roads or is there other iron for that?

Offline Chop Shop

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2017, 02:14:10 pm »
Its refreshing to see some PNW action here!

A tracked grapple gets around good.

Offline Taylorg

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2017, 03:08:18 pm »
So I bought the machine, and the owner identified it as a C4 BG Treefarmer as you guys suspected. Also heavily modified with a reversed operator station. its got the ford industrial gas engine with 4speed trans going into the 2 speed transfer case with reverser (means 4 forward and 4 speeds reverse) also still has the pto output for the original winch thats not being used. Its got a 5 circuit valve bank for the hydraulics with 2 open circuits at the moment. Blade has been removed and Im unsure what the loader is from, possibly a full custom job but it works ok for now, might redo it in time. the grapple is too heavy for the machine so thats probably going to get sold. Everytime I run it I find something else that needs fixing but its a solid machine and at this point I don't feel bad about modifying it more. haha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2017, 03:20:15 pm »
Is the swing dozer also tasked with building roads or is there other iron for that?
Depends on the operations setup, we do some light road building with ours but it's really not setup to do heavy road building an issue is the blade, then the sprocket placement isn't in the best location for pushing the weight is pushed in the center vs rearward. We have an older D7F that makes a much better pusher as well as a good machine for pulling large oversize.

Offline Skeans1

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #35 on: November 29, 2017, 03:21:23 pm »
So I bought the machine, and the owner identified it as a C4 BG Treefarmer as you guys suspected. Also heavily modified with a reversed operator station. its got the ford industrial gas engine with 4speed trans going into the 2 speed transfer case with reverser (means 4 forward and 4 speeds reverse) also still has the pto output for the original winch thats not being used. Its got a 5 circuit valve bank for the hydraulics with 2 open circuits at the moment. Blade has been removed and Im unsure what the loader is from, possibly a full custom job but it works ok for now, might redo it in time. the grapple is too heavy for the machine so thats probably going to get sold. Everytime I run it I find something else that needs fixing but its a solid machine and at this point I don't feel bad about modifying it more. haha

 

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I wonder if at one time it had a shearer head on the front with the extra circuits.

Online Hilltop366

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #36 on: November 29, 2017, 03:34:23 pm »
Interesting machine, seems to go well with the stretch limo on a truck frame, looks like you will be riding in style on your way to the wood lot.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #37 on: November 29, 2017, 07:14:56 pm »
You had me at 5 ton limo.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Can anyone identify this machine?
« Reply #38 on: November 29, 2017, 07:20:56 pm »
What makes you say the grapple is too big?  The lift rams look to be oriented very well for good breakout force but the curl cylinders are basically the opposite. 

Before you do any mods, toss a good pressure gauge into a tee on the main pump line and see what its relieved at.  Id be sure the pump is putting out what its rated for and if belt driven that its not slipping.  Then see if relief can be shimmed up to the hose rating. 


Id love to have that machine.  Woule have a 5ton military winch on the "back" powered by the vacant blade spools in the first week.  Skid and load with one tool... Beautiful.