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Author Topic: Chainsaw production study  (Read 1046 times)

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Offline Firewoodjoe

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Chainsaw production study
« on: November 11, 2017, 09:11:07 am »
I'm looking for anyone's experience on hand bucking productuon. Weather felling and bucking or behind a feller buncher. Even better if someone knew of a study that was done that shows. I know there out there. I've found a few done by states or universities but not good ones on chainsaw. I'll keep looking. Thanks.

Offline quilbilly

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2017, 10:05:43 am »
It's so wood dependent. In clean softwood around 20 inch dbh 3-4 loads per day bucking in the landing. If I bust my rear and the wood is really clean I can get another load or two. Landing setup is a big deal too. If we can only buck 2-3 logs at a time it slows things down. If I can get 5-6 trees per time then production goes way up
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Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2017, 11:17:16 am »
Thus would be low grade hw some logs but mostly bolts and pulp. Forwarded. How many feet/cord on your loads. We haul 10,000 feet 20+ cord loads here. I know your loads are much small cutting that many :)

Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2017, 03:32:33 pm »
Well I'm not having much luck. I've found one from 1946 with buck saws! And one from another country. They were averaging 35" DBH and averaged 5.68 cord per hour per man! Must be big long logs.

Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2017, 03:47:14 pm »
Found another study in Poland for black alder and scots pine. They produced 2-4 cord per hour per man. I couldn't find a average dbh.

Offline Mountain_d

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2017, 07:06:55 am »
In Canada we have an organization called "Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada" (FERIC) that does published research on such topics. Do some web searches and try find a list of reports completed. If the title sounds what you want you can purchase the report from them. The reports are not that expensive and they do a real good job on the research and report. They produced an interesting report on use of farm tractors for use in forestry for Woodlot management. I remember looking at that one about 20 years ago and found it very interesting (various guards etc that could be added). Mountain D.
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Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2017, 07:12:31 am »
Thank you! Ive done a lot of searching and found a lot from other countries but it's not what we cut. Very large trees. Or from the northwest. Also large trees so there production numbers are a great deal higher then ours. I'll look for what you mentioned.

Offline Riwaka

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2017, 06:04:02 pm »
Not quite the right subject area.
Quick browse of this- even back in 2003? a timberjack 460 cable (150hp) was pulling the wood quicker in a 50 acre stand than the faller could put trees  on the ground with a Husky 372.

Wang, J., Long, C., McNeel, J., Baumgras, J., 2004: Productivity
and cost of manual felling and cable skidding in central
Appalachain hardwood forests. Forest Prod J 54(12): 4551.

https://www.fs.fed.us/ne/newtown_square/publications/other_publishers/OCR/ne_2004_wang001.pdf

Li, Y., Wang, J., Miller, G., McNeel, J., 2006: Production economics
of harvesting small-diameter hardwood stands in
central Appalachia. Forest Prod J 56(3): 8186.
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.550.2438&rep=rep1&type=pdf

http://www.kylesconverter.com/volume/board--feet-to-cords

Cross cutting/ Bucking is going to a function of the skills/ (&tools available) of the log maker.


Offline maple flats

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2017, 07:23:35 pm »
That topic is so variable I think you are better just running random timing and finding an answer with whatever your situation is. Big straight logs on well run landing where big loads can come in at the right rate for the one bucking will likely win every time. If loads over whelm the bucker he slows and if he(or she) has to wait it will also slow down. Also, the outgoing loads need to leave promptly.
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Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2017, 07:55:31 pm »
I know there's a lot of variables. I'm only looking for the cutters ability to cut down and buck trees. That's it. I dont care about skidding or trucking. And I realize some guys are slower or the timber is bigger or just limby or the land is flat or hilly. But I would think I could come up with some good facts and a better business plan if I had something. Like a man cutting lodge pole pine in 16 footers and a man cutting poplar into 8s. You could calculate those "close" to the same. Thanks for the help.

Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2017, 07:58:22 pm »
Actually Riwaka table 1 in your post is exactly what I'm looking for. Thanks.

Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2017, 08:04:56 pm »
Well I'm looking for short wood bucking but this still helps.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2017, 08:15:32 pm »
What do you need the info for?  Just curious

Offline Firewoodjoe

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2017, 08:27:15 pm »
Possible start up business. Bank like to see all the info u can get and I like to do all the paper work before I take the risk and "think" I can make money. And also I'm calculating cost vs production of a feller and hand felling. I know there's is a gain in that but it's not just about the gain in production but my goal is also low overhead and simpler repairs. Prolly over thinking but that's what I do. :)

Offline Southside logger

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Re: Chainsaw production study
« Reply #14 on: Yesterday at 12:12:45 am »
Well, I have done it both ways and I can tell you that in typical wood in the eastern US, on reasonable slopes (ie - the deer don't have two legs shorter than the others) there is no comparison to what a guy hand felling can to compared to the work of a buncher.  I don't just mean production either, quality of your remaining crown, reduced ground trash, ease of collection for the skidder.  Then there is the whole injury, fatigue, issue that sets in.  You can find decent bunchers for short money.  My '92 Franklin 5000 is completely mechanical, very reliable, and most parts can be found at NAPA or online.  I do hand fell high grade trees and oversize ones with a serious lean or other complication to them as it is quicker and cleaner to do it that way in select cutting, but the Husky does not see nearly as much wood as she did in the past and my production has gone up along with the quality of my finished areas.  Just my $0.02 worth. 
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