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Author Topic: bug/larvae ID  (Read 572 times)

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Offline coppolajc10

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bug/larvae ID
« on: September 01, 2017, 09:47:08 pm »
Found these in hickory slabs near sawmill cut into firewood. They were also in some hickory lumber that was air drying. It looks kinda like pics of ash borer larvae, is that possible? Does anyone know what these are? I'm in western NY.

  

  

  


Online bucknwfl

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2017, 10:18:37 pm »
Appears to be a round headed borer but could be the flat head borer. Easy to tell the flat he looks like he slammed in to a wall face first.  Just google you will find all you want to know.  The are a large family of beetles

Thanks

Buck
If it was easy everybody would be doing it

Offline coppolajc10

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2017, 10:52:45 pm »
Is there an easy way to treat the air drying lumber to get rid of these, or a way to prevent in future stacks?

Offline serg

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2017, 12:36:55 am »
Hello friends!
Beetle larva kills at a temperature of 320 F.
 The Echoes of the world wars of the 20th century, temperature has no effect!




Sergey

Offline WDH

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2017, 07:27:08 am »
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline GeneWengert-WoodDoc

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2017, 01:49:51 pm »
Larva and insects are killed at 133 F. 

Wood will turn dark colored and char quickly at 320 F or so and fine dust can ignite.
Gene - Author of articles in Sawmill & Woodlot and books: Drying Hardwood Lumber; VA Tech Solar Kiln; Sawing Edging & Trimming Hardwood Lumber. And more

Offline coppolajc10

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2017, 08:12:10 pm »
thanks WDH for the link. if i'm sawing live edge should I spray the bark with a borax solution or something? they seemed to only go in on the bark of the live edge boards. thanks.

Offline serg

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2017, 01:36:47 am »
GeneWengert-WoodDoc.
You are right about the ignition of the shavings.
The sealed cylinder, no air access, no risk of fire. I'm doing the stability of the tree, the fight with the beetles, fungi, color, noble, beautiful. The photo bug is located in the oak floor boards. The operation of the floor boards without cracks, no shrinkage and shrinkage. Biggest guarantee on joinery products.
Sergey.

Offline GeneWengert-WoodDoc

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2017, 07:15:30 am »
If you spray the bark with an insecticide, you need to get 100% coverage including getting into all the cracks and crevices.  So, you need to have a great deal of solution to achieve this coverage, and even then you may not get deep enough.  Because of the excess solution, you should probably have a method of catching the excess that drips off the log rather than letting the excess go into the soil.  Submerging the logs in the solution would probably work, but this is not practical and would be expensive.  Of course, such insecticides are only effective if the insect then eats the treated bark.  Once they get into the wood, the spray or dip is probably not present.  As bark is highly water repellant and it is hard to get any chemical into the bark, it is likely that the insecticide will not penetrate into the bark but will merely cover the outside of the bark and all the crevices.  Penetration into the bark and wood, therefore, would seem minimal.  The best plan is to cut healthy trees, and then saw them promptly or keep them soaking wet in short storage time.

It is also important to remember that an insecticide on and in the bark crevices will be in the dust when you saw the log and will be in the bark itself that remains on the lumber.  As such, it might be a hazard for the sawyer or anyone handling the lumber.  Borates are likely quite safe in this regard.  However, borates on a log that is then rained on will wash off the log as borates are water soluble.
Gene - Author of articles in Sawmill & Woodlot and books: Drying Hardwood Lumber; VA Tech Solar Kiln; Sawing Edging & Trimming Hardwood Lumber. And more

Offline PA_Walnut

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2017, 08:58:36 pm »
This thread is intriguing to me as I cut some hickory a 3 weeks ago and haven't sawn the logs yet. They are large diameter so I don't wanna loose them. If I cut them into lumber, remove the bark and get them air-drying ASAP, does that mitigate the infestation risk?
Thx
I own my own small piece of the world on an 8 acre plot on the side of a mountain with walnut, hickory, ash and spruce.
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Offline WDH

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Re: bug/larvae ID
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2017, 03:34:26 pm »
Yes Sir, especially for ambrosia beetle.  However, the painted hickory borer gets into the living tree and may be in the wood before you even cut the tree down.  However, cutting the logs into lumber will stop any active painted hickory borer or ambrosia beetle infestation.  Once the boards are sawn and begin to dry , any ambrosia beetles in the wood will exit the building with Elvis. 
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com