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Author Topic: Building a house with a sawmill  (Read 3505 times)

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Offline Ianab

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #80 on: December 03, 2017, 06:42:05 pm »
You are correct that you should be drying with the intended location in mind.

The majority of US homes with their central heating do get very dry, especially over Winter. Although the outside air might be 50-60% RH, when you heat it up to a comfortable level you are down under 30%.

But if you are going to control that with humidification, then aim to have your wood at the appropiate level.

A piece of wood in my house sits around 13%. But then I have to run a DEhumidifier to keep my humidity down around 60%. And that's off today as it's a nice Summer day and the house is opened up. RH outside has come Down to about 70% by midday. It started the morning around 100% (Morning mist)

So 8% wood is not a good thing for me, it would need to gain moisture before use.

And bugs are killed by heat in a kiln. PBB beetles can live at 8% MC, which is what makes them so annoying.  :-[  The majority of bug that might live in green wood will die off as the wood dries out. But that's when the PBBs like to move in.
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Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #81 on: December 03, 2017, 06:46:15 pm »
 It's cold here right now Ian, thanks for reminding us that you're enjoying a wonderful summer.  :snowball: :snowball: :snowball:
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Offline Magicman

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #82 on: December 03, 2017, 06:55:50 pm »
No sheetrock is under my SYP wall paneling and I have no idea about Clyde's Red Oak.  It's also in the same county with no permits or inspections.

We have no fire (truck, etc.) protection so if it catches fire it will go to the ground anyway.  As long as we get out nothing else matters.  There is no fire insurance on it either because it is classified as an "unoccupied" dwelling.
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Offline reswire

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #83 on: December 03, 2017, 07:18:01 pm »
I live in South East kentucky and there aren't any building restrictions other than septic and if you own over 25 acres you fall under a homestead act and you don't need plumbing inspection either.  I've cut about 60 tulip poplar from my land and are cutting them 68 to build a log house with my woodlands hm126.. I've only got 3800 In my mill.
  Do you know many people who have used Tulip Poplar for a log cabin build?  I've got access to quite a few, but was always concerned if the poplar would withstand the weather.
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Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #84 on: December 03, 2017, 08:03:54 pm »
I do grade, but only lumber from my mill, It's the way the law is set up here.
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Offline Don P

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #85 on: December 03, 2017, 08:06:22 pm »
Almost all the NE states now have native lumber laws, several down here do but not me yet.

Poplar cabins are out there, Dolly can't be wrong  ;D  there is one about a half mile above me that has newspapers from WWI on the walls. If you keep the wood dry it works. Tulip poplar, yellow poplar, tends to open up a wide check as it dries which is why most log home companies shy away from it.

8% is the emc for ~35%RH if memory serves. I've metered the wood in the house in the winter and that is where I bottom out around Feb. There is good reason for drying below the in service emc slightly, joints tighten slightly rather than the opposite and there is a hysteresis, lagging effect, you will stay slightly on whichever side of emc you approach it from. the wood is slightly more stable on the dryer side if you can get there. In the summer we will run up to 15%emc and higher for short periods, I'd really rather be lagging then. These are ideals, I've had to nail stuff up the next day and have also had the luxury of building a sauna on site... dry kiln  ;D There are houses where I've thought "good enough" and gone back later to more shrinkage than I liked. In shops we would accept up through 12% before sending a truck back.

Offline Magicman

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #86 on: December 03, 2017, 09:07:38 pm »
Tulip Poplar is our "go to" for B&B siding, but you want to avoid roof runoff spatter with any species.
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Offline drobertson

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #87 on: December 03, 2017, 10:27:22 pm »
As clear as much of the poplar I've seen sawn at the shoot outs at the Paul Bunyan shows, I have to believe I would and many folks around here would have made good use of the wood.  Now the sawing like went on at the shoot outs? well, it would not have flown very far here, but, what  I witnessed the wood act much like SYP but has the deciduous characteristics. I've never sawn a lick of it, but really wanted to, and all I have to say is if a house is to be built, and the codes allow it, then with some proper planning it can be done with much less cost than going through the lumber yards.  Now time is somewhat of a factor, so time has to be considered,,,and then considered again. And not only that, the amounts of crap you might see culled at your local lumber yard,,the stuff that may be on top or the real bad thrown off to the side,, well figure on this happening with anything you saw out.  The ones that accomplish the task,, start to finish, and dried finished interiors, Well, it is a prize to show off in my book, you can do it, but be ready for set backs and disappointments along the way.  Knowing whats ahead helps a little on being ready for what you about to arrive to and face. 
only have a few chain saws I'm not suppose to use, but will at times, one dog Dolly, pretty good dog, just not sure what for yet,  working on getting the gardening back in order, and kinda thinking on maybe a small bbq bizz,  thinking about it,

Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #88 on: December 04, 2017, 05:34:06 am »
W Pine here works well for siding. We have poplar here, I have cut tons of it, For me here I have no market for it. And I think it smells bad. :D :D
I have cut timbers for customers [customers logs] and I have seen 6x6 timbers twist while cutting on the mill. :o
Having a sawmill is a handy tool to have, Opens a lot of doors for you.
2008 LT40 super,2008 edger, Cat telahandler, JD 5410 And can cut up to 45' long
http://www.forestryforum.com/sanbornton     NH Timberland Owners Association supporter.
And a license NH soft wood grader.
Sawing since 1987