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Author Topic: Building a house with a sawmill  (Read 3504 times)

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Offline KamHillbilly

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2017, 03:37:07 pm »
I cut all most all my lumber for my house years ago but I am in an unorganized township no building permits required
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Offline red

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2017, 05:38:06 pm »
Do some searching for Thomas in Kentucky or Massie house blog . . it's more like a Timber Frame Castle
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2017, 06:33:22 pm »
Time.time and more time it will take.  ;D  Trees have to be cut and hauled to the mill. I could only take one at a time. Slow,but it worked. I had a bunch of talkers that said they could build the Women Cave faster than I could. Most was talking to the wife.the few that said it to me,I told them to be here tommorow at 7 am and I will watch you build it faster than me.  ::) Did not get much help.  :D
Takes time to cut the trees,saw and build. The talkers have it all delivered and have no idea.
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Offline grouch

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2017, 07:18:05 pm »
Time.time and more time it will take.  ;D  Trees have to be cut and hauled to the mill. I could only take one at a time. Slow,but it worked. I had a bunch of talkers that said they could build the Women Cave faster than I could. Most was talking to the wife.the few that said it to me,I told them to be here tommorow at 7 am and I will watch you build it faster than me.  ::) Did not get much help.  :D
Takes time to cut the trees,saw and build. The talkers have it all delivered and have no idea.

Wow. I think I had the same gang of talkers not helping me with my house, garage and my son's house! Small world.  :D

People don't seem to realize that building by yourself is significantly different than hiring a crew. Even two people working together can usually work 3 times as fast as 1 alone. Just a gofer can cut the time almost in half.
Find something to do that interests you.

Offline Banjo picker

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2017, 08:15:47 pm »
If you have the time, go for it.  I have built several houses, there is no comparison to the satisfaction I get out of using my own lumber to nailing up store bought stuff.  The only lumber I bought when I did the addition on my house was the treated 2 x 6's for bottom plates.  I would also suggest that if you do decide to saw and build, start you a thread and document the build every step of the way here on this forum.  I just went back and looked at all my pictures and reread all the nice comments forum members made today of my build. Banjo
Cooks AC 36--Prentice 210C--Morgan edger--Kubota M7040 with loader--Case 580 K with extendahoe--Case 850C dozer--Int 1700 series twin cylinder dump/log/flatbed truck--logging arch--2 logrite mill sp.--Cat claw sharpening system--And a bulldog to make sure it all stays here.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2017, 08:53:19 pm »
And I forgot to post,I tried to clean up each tree too. I cut the brush into short pieces and hauled out each top for firewood. That added alot of time too.
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Offline Banjo picker

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2017, 09:52:17 pm »
cfarm I leave a place for the rabbits to hide. ;)  It all melts into the ground in a couple of years around here anyway.  I do get out the good firewood but the tops stay.  Banjo
Cooks AC 36--Prentice 210C--Morgan edger--Kubota M7040 with loader--Case 580 K with extendahoe--Case 850C dozer--Int 1700 series twin cylinder dump/log/flatbed truck--logging arch--2 logrite mill sp.--Cat claw sharpening system--And a bulldog to make sure it all stays here.

Offline Jmiller160

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2017, 12:01:34 am »
I've already got my trees cut back in the winter, I've been milling for about a month in what time I have available.. I'm building a 32x50 log house with 6x8 logs, Appalachian style.

Online rjwoelk

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #28 on: August 18, 2017, 12:10:09 am »
buuilt this 22x26 ft cabin all cut on a lt15


 
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Online rjwoelk

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #29 on: August 18, 2017, 12:37:34 am »
after staining and more work done on it.


 
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Offline 78NHTFY

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #30 on: August 18, 2017, 05:59:58 pm »
Yup, lots of satisfaction in doing it yourself--kinda like raising kids: you forget most of the tough times & remember only the good.  I look in my woods and say to myself: this wood came from there--chainsawed, dragged, bandsawed, stickered, selected, chopsawed, circular sawed, radial arm sawed, some planed, built with, stained.....how many times did I handle each piece of wood? I forget but I think that's good :D.  Took me two years to build my barn, last 9 months to put on this kitchen addition to the house.  On the addition, every piece of wood that I could make I used: 6 x 12 x 20 sill beams; 2 x 6 wall studs; 2 x 10 floor joists; 2 x 12 rafters; all the exterior trim; 1/2 clapboards (not tapered).  Started project in Dec '16 so had to buy 5/8"  4 x 8 roofing and 1/2" sheathing.  Had a week on and off of help but basically did it solo.  Pics below are barn; addition; soon-to-be kitchen table.  All the best, Rob

  

  

  
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Offline TKehl

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #31 on: August 18, 2017, 06:39:11 pm »
Sounds like you have time on your side and several half size helpers available.  If you can swing the rest of the budget for the house (wiring etc.), I'd go for it. 

If you want some planning ideas try this site (no affiliation): 

http://countryplans.com/

Don't know your experience level, but they have house plans that a complete novice can build.  Plus a helpful forum with build threads etc.
Lucas 6-13+slabber, Mr. Sawmill bandmill, orange chainsaws, JD SSL, Case Backhoe, farm tractors, trailers, and 150ish acres of trees.  Fledgling woodshop with CNC router, laser engraver, Woodmaster 712, and a Berlin 108 moulder (project).  Oh, and a lovely (patient) wife and four offbearers.

Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #32 on: December 01, 2017, 02:12:09 am »
Our designer tells me that by specifying #2 grade, and with PE approval of the sizing taking that into account, that we then effectively have no grade requirement and can use "ungraded" lumber so long as it is big enough.  That is in VA--is it true elsewhere where grading is required?

Yes, it would mean larger stuff, but wood is abundant for us.
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Offline ljmathias

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #33 on: December 01, 2017, 06:34:57 am »
I've built four houses and in the process of building a fifth, plus 5 barns or out buildings. I'm of two minds about using all self-cut lumber (and two minds is better than one, no?). First is price: once you have the tools (and it's not just the mill, it's the backhoe/tractor plus planar plus table saw plus ...) then you can win on price. Problem is, as others have said already, it's incredibly labor intensive and uses up huge amounts of time. If you have those in plenty, go for it.

Biggest problem for me is quality. In trying to save time and effort, I tend to use trees and the lumber I get that are marginal: bad idea as the boards warp and bend during drying and even in the framing. Had to hand trim a number of framing studs because of that. Frustration factor is also something to consider: do I throw this board out or try to make it work? Do I resaw all my studs because I underestimated shrinkage and half of them are 1/8 to 1/4" too wide?

For framing, I've come to the conclusion that time is more valuable than money. Also, last few houses have used trusses for roof and attic/upper story and this only makes sense when you buy them. Making my own holds zero attraction for me. So in the future, I'll just buy commercial framing studs pre-cut to length plus trusses for the top half.

Having said that, I LOVE the live edge siding we use. That's evolved from 1" to 3/4" plus I use fresh cut trees. Did one house with lightening and beetle kill: bad idea! Hate how it stained and went up with some punky areas in almost every board. Now the fresh cut boards air dried for a couple of weeks retain pale yellow color (no blue stain) so that the stain color chosen is what you actually get. That plus the fact that I can do lap siding by myself (not easily and with my shoulder right now, not at all, but can be done with careful planning). With two people it goes up fast but ideal is three: one to cut and two to hang. I always use screws in building now, both for framing and for siding, facia and soffit hanging. Last longer, don't pull out, and if you make a mistake, zip the screws out and fix it, no big deal. Cost more? Yes, but I'm building for kids and grandkids to live in, so...

Anyway, my two cents worth...

LJ
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Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #34 on: December 01, 2017, 07:11:29 am »
As stated early on the big problem is local codes. You may have to buy load bearing stamped lumber for rafters and floor joists. Post and beam and log construction can be an option. Talk to your building inspector some are sports and will work with you if you won't hang them out to dry. Frank C.
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Online Don P

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #35 on: December 01, 2017, 06:24:54 pm »
Exactly, do find out from the building official before you start what he is going to require.

 MBF, here is the wording in the VA code, and many other states this is straight from the ICC model code. Timberframe actually falls under the engineering clause as well, this is referring to dimensional lumber.
This clause is at the beginning of every framing chapter and calls out the structural lumber used in that part of the house as needing grading, so this was from the floor chapter, the roof chapter will call out rafters and ceiling joist as needing grading for instance. What I'm saying is they are waving this in your and the inspectors view multiple times. (I've had them sympathize heavily but point this out)
Quote
Load-bearing dimension lumber for joists, beams and girders shall be identified by a grade mark of a lumber grading or inspection agency that has been approved by an accreditation body that complies with DOC PS 20. In lieu of a grade mark, a certificate of inspection issued by a lumber grading or inspection agency meeting the requirements of this section shall be accepted.
Enforcement is another matter, I can get entirely different answers from a building official in another county. Do consider insurance, ungraded you are building outside of state law, will they honor a claim? I don't know. In my county the BO will let an engineer grade. He's rightfully remarked that I'm using him as an insurer of last resort. I've joked back that I'm paying enough that no matter what it is, his lawyer will surely prove it is my fault  :D

Before you get too deep a visit with the building department to clear that up would be a good idea.

  ljmathias makes a good point, that desire to make use of a board full of personal labor takes more than most people have to reject it. I've watched grade change upon need in every way necessary, I've seen other people do it too.

Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #36 on: December 01, 2017, 07:57:28 pm »
 Law is the law, but like you say enforcement varies.   I guess I'm fortunate, the PE who told my designer about bypassing lumber grading and the chief inspector where we will be building are personal friends.

 Really, has anyone on this forum had the experience of their licensed engineer, PE, being overruled by a building inspector?    Rare as snow in July in Florida I'll bet.   I get that the engineer who told me that a PE could without a doubt overrule, was wrong by the statute, but I'm talking about practice.

Oh, and by the way, in our county, the County Board of Supervisors appoints the head building inspector, and he reports to them.  They can overrule him if a citizen appeals to them.   I can't speak for statewide, but that's the case in Goochland County.    But again, unless there's a professional engineer pleading the case to them, I can't imagine they would overrule their inspector.  In my four years on the Board here, we never had it come up.   I did personally go to the inspector one time and tell him to stop being a jerk to a particular contractor.   He later got fired by a subsequent Board.

I do regret that we appointed him.   Our county administrator at the time, who also later got fired, picked him from an adjoining county and we rubberstamped his recommendation.  We did not do our homework or properly question the guy.

Kind of like what Congress is getting ready to do on that tax bill, that hasn't even been fully written yet.  Yes, fellow FF members, our Congress (Senate) is about to vote on a bill that's not even fully in writing yet.  If you're not appalled by that, what will it take to get you appalled?   As a CPA, I can tell you that some of the stuff that IS for certain in the bill already is as stupid as h--.  I'm still getting over the Medicare drug "coverage" donut hole incredibility. Rant mode off.

 I would have to review what is called the Dillon rule before I could say for sure how firm the ground is that our county is on.  That rule has to do with the supremacy of state law over local law;  it is pretty much a nationwide thing,  but as with everything in the law, interpretations rule.
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Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #37 on: December 01, 2017, 08:08:11 pm »
On the point of cost versus benefit, I don't plan to do my own 2 x 4's. Unless I suddenly become blessed with a lot more time than I have now.  Now if I were in the wilds of Alaska, and Home Depot or Lowe's was a long ways away, the mileage might vary.

I also can see that it would be a lot of fun to be able to say that every stick of lumber in a house came from one's land.

My main concern with this issue is the big timber framing timbers.   I recall Don saying something about a knot in a big beam that got overlooked. No matter what your designation is,  or how many tests you have passed, stupid or careless or both is still stupid....

 Or, just accidental.  Or maybe I should say, accident-causing?   Our world is totally completely full of..."no guarantees".
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Offline starmac

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2017, 10:07:26 pm »
Well I am in Alaska, but it is probably only 3 miles to a lowes or home depot. It is worth it to me to cut a 2x4 out to keep from going through a whole bundle of theirs, looking for a straight one, then only to bring it home and have it split from end to end while driving the first nail.

I know I am exaggerating, but they do handle a lot of lumber that I call junk.
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Offline Southside logger

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Re: Building a house with a sawmill
« Reply #39 on: December 01, 2017, 10:08:58 pm »
Personal experience is that I can not saw small dimensional lumber cheaper than I can buy it, and that is from pine growing on land I own.  Now start getting into 2 x 10, or 2 x 12 - 16' and yes I can save a bundle.  Perfect example is a pole barn kit we bought, 36' x 48'.  20' treated 6 x 6 posts, engineered steel trusses, 2 x 6 #2 spurlins, delivered to us from a facility in Florida and it was cheaper than I could produce it, and I can get treating done at a plant 25 miles from here. 

As the others said, flooring, trim, siding - all places to save big money and end up with quality beyond anything you can buy.  One thing to really be careful with when using your own lumber is the potential for insect issues.  Air drying will not kill everything that may be lurking in a stick of wood, and if said stick becomes a framing member behind a wall when the pregnant creepy crawlie wakes up, well you see the potential. 

If you could devise a cheap way to replicate heat treating to be sure you have killed off anything you can't see in the wood then you really reduce the potential for issues down the road.   

Not trying to discourage you at all, I have put up multiple buildings using rough sawn lumber that we bought and have produced ourselves, just want to give you as much information as possible so you can invest your time the best way possible. 
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