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Author Topic: Pride comes before a fall  (Read 454 times)

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Offline Roundhouse

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Pride comes before a fall
« on: August 11, 2017, 12:19:22 am »
I've been milling for a little over a year, not major production but learning a lot. I know the consensus around here regarding cutting into ones backstops as a rite of passage. I'll admit to some smugness around not having done that yet. Last month I was milling some maple on my HM130. Things were going well as I got the cant squared up and I took care to lower my backstops and clamps, ready to make boards. The unfortunate part is that I overcompensated and brought them a little too low. Halfway through the first board the cant popped free and wedged the blade in place a jaunty angle before I could get it stopped.


First to evaluate, one thing was for sure, I couldn't back out.


Next I put in some wedges to open up the kerf, nope still jammed too tight, even with tension taken off the blade.


I considered cutting away board with the chainsaw but I feared the consequences if the two blades touched. Instead I started drilling across the board above the blade.


One more look with the board broken free. You can see the contortion of the blade before I raised the head and re-clamped the cant.

So there you have it. Avoiding the backstops is good but don't get carried away and drop them too fast, too soon.
Woodland Mills HM130, 1995 F350 7.3L, 1988 F350 dump, 1979 Ford CL340 Skid Steer, 1988 Yamaha Moto-4 200, various chain saws

Offline paul case

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Re: Pride comes before a fall
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2017, 05:54:54 am »
Many times you can cut the board off right behind the blade and it will back out. Dont ask how I know. MANY times.

PC
life is too short to be too serious. (some idiot)
2013 LT40SHE25 and Riehl edger,  WM 94 LT40 hd E15. Cut my sawing ''teeth'' on an EZ Boardwalk
sawing oak.hickory,ERC,walnut and almost anything else that shows up.
Don't get phylosophical with me. you will loose me for sure.
pc

Offline fishfighter

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Re: Pride comes before a fall
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2017, 06:03:35 am »
Yep, been there and done that too! ;D And yes, the blade was toast. :( Hitting a back stop is better. :D

Online Peter Drouin

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Re: Pride comes before a fall
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2017, 06:29:08 am »
You can keep cutting when that happens, Just go up with the blade and push, up out of the cut.
Most times you can save the blade. Try it next time. :D
2008 LT40 super, And can cut up to 45' long
http://www.forestryforum.com/sanbornton     NH Timberland Owners Association supporter.
And a license NH soft wood grader.
Sawing since 1987

Offline Chuck White

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Re: Pride comes before a fall
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2017, 07:35:00 am »
Been there, done that too!   :-\
~Chuck~
Retired USAF (1989), Retired School Bus Driver (2012), and now a Mobile Sawyer
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG2425 Kohler - Shingle & LapSider
Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain the Wood-Mizer.
I LOVE MY SAWMILL