The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:




TimberKing Sawmills



The Largest Inventory of Used Chainsaw Parts in the World

Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools


Forest Products Industry Insurance

Norwood Industries Inc.

Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL

Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Comstock Logging

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: Trees for pasture  (Read 467 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Lnewman

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 111
  • Location: Marion Twp, Butler County, PA
  • Gender: Male
Trees for pasture
« on: May 12, 2017, 10:32:23 pm »
i'm clearing some land for pasture but would like to keep a few good trees for shade for the cattle.  Any recommendations for a good tree species to plant or leave in Lowland pasture and Benchland pasture and hillside pasture?
Stihl 170, 210MS, 290MS, 441MS and Hudson bandsaw

Offline dnalley

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 278
  • Age: 72
  • Location: Whitesburg, Ga
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2017, 10:05:14 am »
i heard my Dad talk about burying 10 or 12 of the finest cows he'd ever seen with a 955, from standing under a pasture tree during a thunderstorm.  Just food for thought :o       (edit- just found this to be a double post.  didn't see the earlier one)   dwight                                           

Offline Texas Ranger

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 6209
  • Age: 76
  • Location: Livingston, Texas, God's Country
  • Gender: Male
  • Texan, by God and by choice.
    • Staples Forestry
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2017, 02:37:17 pm »
pole barn might be better.
The Ranger, home of Texas Forestry

Offline nativewolf

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 253
  • I'm new!
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2017, 03:28:35 pm »
Well, keeping the trees fenced off will be key.  Your issue might be that the trees in PA are going to grow so slowly that they won't produce shade for a decade at least.  Almost any tree works, I avoid walnuts due to not liking to slip on walnuts in the fall.  Ash would have been nice (but no more), maple would be good think as the develop large crowns in the open, Locust are nice too and are nitrogen fixers.

A lean-to might be a faster way to get them shade though.

Offline Ron Wenrich

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13100
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Jonestown, PA
  • Gender: Male
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2017, 11:23:37 am »
We had a bunch of honey locust come into the mill one time and they were used more along fence rows.  Seems that the pods added to the browse for the cattle.  The biggest problem with cattle and trees is the amount of soil compaction you get from the cows.  Soil compaction will kill trees.  If you want to provide shade, it might be better from the other side of the fence.  Avoid cherry, as the wilted leaves contain cyanide.  A strong storm can send them into your pasture.

As an aside to black locust and nitrogen fixation; that's true, but they use to plant black locust around barns as they seemed to attract lightning.  They now have lightning rods on barns, and it isn't as prevalent.  Just something to think about if you are using it as a pasture tree.
Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

Offline chevytaHOE5674

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 2671
  • Location: Ontonagon Mi
  • Gender: Male
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2017, 01:32:15 pm »
The biggest problem with cattle and trees is the amount of soil compaction you get from the cows.  Soil compaction will kill trees.

Soo true. Three years back I fenced in a pasture with about 3 acres of aspen/maple/ash. I'd say that probably 1/3 of the trees are already showing heavy crown dieback, figure within a few years it will all be dead or dieing.

Offline Lnewman

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 111
  • Location: Marion Twp, Butler County, PA
  • Gender: Male
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2017, 04:54:46 am »
Soil compaction is not a problem in sandy soils    It certainly is not a problem with the boxelder trees in the pasture now.  Like the idea of black locusts but they do shed branches easily
Stihl 170, 210MS, 290MS, 441MS and Hudson bandsaw

Offline Chuck White

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 9965
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Russell, NY (Way Upstate)
  • Gender: Male
  • Sawing Mobile since 2005
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2017, 07:04:08 am »
In this area, quite a few farms have Thorn Apple scattered here and there in their pastures!

It's actually IMO one of the best choices because they don't get very tall, and they have a wide canopy when they reach maturity!

Just have to be mindful of the thorns!
~Chuck~
Retired USAF (1989), Retired School Bus Driver (2012), and now a Mobile Sawyer
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG2425 Kohler - Shingle & LapSider
Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain the Wood-Mizer.
I LOVE MY SAWMILL

Offline Lnewman

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 111
  • Location: Marion Twp, Butler County, PA
  • Gender: Male
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2017, 06:46:19 am »
Instead of Thornapple what about a real Apple tree
Stihl 170, 210MS, 290MS, 441MS and Hudson bandsaw

Offline chevytaHOE5674

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 2671
  • Location: Ontonagon Mi
  • Gender: Male
Re: Trees for pasture
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2017, 02:32:52 pm »
Be careful with apple trees in the pasture. 2 years back I lost a nice heifer who choked on an apple.