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Author Topic: Dealing with wild hogs  (Read 2517 times)

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Offline LeeB

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Dealing with wild hogs
« on: April 07, 2017, 11:55:18 pm »
Our new place is overrun with wild hogs. Any tips on hunting them and getting rid of them in general?
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, Ford 851 tractor, JD 3032 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton and 2005 1 ton Dodge 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2017, 06:10:26 am »
 :rifle:
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Offline ellmoe

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2017, 07:07:02 am »
   Many, many, many (!) years ago my cousin and I spent all of our free time hunting hogs with trail dogs and pit bull dogs for catching. Not too many people did that then. Now, there are a lot of hog hunters, actively looking for places to hunt. I have seen areas where the hogs have been "caught out". I realize that our population  (human) is much higher than in Texas, so less hunter density, but that may be an avenue to pursue. We did our best hunting at night, hogs are moving then and it is cooler for man and beast. Good luck.
Mark, Wildlife Biologist (in my previous life), now 2 HD40E25's, Weining Promat, Koetter Kilns (2), Sore back and arthritic fingers!

Offline coxy

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2017, 07:14:41 am »
I and about 10 friends would help you out but its a little far to travel for a day hunt  :)

Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2017, 07:20:37 am »
10 yrs or so ago Russian boar stock hogs got loose from a local game farm and multiplied to a huntable population.
I was the gofer while my pals pursued them in the winter.
they shot 23 that winter and the population dwindled or got smarter after that.
The local Dept of Environmental Conservation along with the USDA instituted a trapping program and now they are virtually gone.
Game farms close by are now Kaput
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Offline LeeB

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2017, 07:34:31 am »
I have given thought to offering up a few hunts for those willing to pay for the opportunity.  :D

I also would like to take a few of them myself. I love to make my own sausage. Anybody make traps?
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, Ford 851 tractor, JD 3032 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton and 2005 1 ton Dodge 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2017, 08:51:27 am »
Lee,

   I think trapping is going to be the most efficient and cost effective method. Mom has them on her place in Fla and cousin and neighbors have caught a few. Just make a strong pen with a trap door built in the gate. A one way swinging door will allow more than one to enter if you are lucky. Just make sure they can't lift it from inside. Be sure it is staked down well so they can't get their noses under it and lift. Heavy welded panels from TSC would be easy to use. Could drive up Metal T posts to attach to. They put feed/bait in it with it open and let them feed a few days then set the trap.

   Another option is snares which can be bought on line from various places and not too expensive. Putting some barriers up to funnel them into the noose will improve likelihood of catching them.

   Check your local regs. Since they are not game animals many states allow shooting year round and even at night. If the area allowed and I were night hunting them I'd let the local game warden know my plans. He might even help get rid of them. Good luck.
Howard Green
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Offline coxy

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2017, 09:34:38 am »
10 yrs or so ago Russian boar stock hogs got loose from a local game farm and multiplied to a huntable population.
I was the gofer while my pals pursued them in the winter.
they shot 23 that winter and the population dwindled or got smarter after that.
The local Dept of Environmental Conservation along with the USDA instituted a trapping program and now they are virtually gone.
Game farms close by are now Kaput
pete we had the same over by long eddy ny I was logging the other side of the hill and never seen one the locals and dec was shooting up a storm I was mad I never got to see or shoot one off the skidder  :D

Offline Texas Ranger

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2017, 12:59:57 pm »
one year we trapped or shot over 70.  Once you catch a few in a trap, you have to move it, they are smart and will not go back in that trap.  If a new herd comes in, yeah, you'll catch a few, but be prepared to move the trap frequently.
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Offline coxy

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2017, 06:31:35 pm »
how come a domestic bore pig that still has his jewels is nasty strong but a wild bore pig is not that bad  ??? never had a wild one but that's what I was told any truth to that

Offline ellmoe

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2017, 07:52:55 pm »
how come a domestic bore pig that still has his jewels is nasty strong but a wild bore pig is not that bad  ??? never had a wild one but that's what I was told any truth to that

In my experience 99% are not fit to eat. Personally, I will not kill one for myself. I have killed a few on request for someone else. My only stipulation was to not be invited for dinner! When we used to catch boars, the biggest were sent up to Pete's "neck of the woods", the smaller ones were removed from the reproductive population and allowed to fatten and flavor up.
Mark, Wildlife Biologist (in my previous life), now 2 HD40E25's, Weining Promat, Koetter Kilns (2), Sore back and arthritic fingers!

Offline WDH

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2017, 08:09:07 pm »
I don't consider them good eating either, especially the boars.  They are nasty, and the meat is so tough that you can hardly chew it.  Some people catch them and pen them and feed them for a few months to clean them out.  Not worth the trouble to me. 
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Offline Gearbox

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2017, 08:17:21 pm »
My friend his brother and nephew are SW of Fort Smith in Texas hunting them right now .They will eat what they shoot . I think the taste has a lot to do with how they are handled . They need to be killed gutted and hung in a cooler within a hour .
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Offline Texas Ranger

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2017, 09:00:32 pm »
Boar hog meat smells and tastes bad, no matter how you treat it.  Young hogs not bad, but needed to be treated immediately in that they spoil in a hurry.  You can sometimes get a strong chunk of bacon with that taste, it is not pleasant.
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Offline Magicman

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2017, 09:17:44 pm »
Dealing with wild hogs is one time when it is acceptable to not eat what you kill.  Taking out as many as you can is the name of the game.  They reproduce and multiply like rats. 
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Offline Larry

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2017, 09:43:41 pm »
B-I-L had a lease in Texas where we hunted and trapped them.  Keep nothing over 80 pounds and no boars over 40.  Immediately after killing one skin it, than field dress.  Bone it out as much as possible and get the meat on ice.  Best pork I've ever had.

Nephew with his first hog and this is about the perfect size.  Think we trapped 3 and shot two from the same bunch but time blurs my memory.



Lee, a friend in Eureka first noticed hog damage a little over a year ago and found out he is overrun with them.  He had a trap built and continues to trap hogs.  Its a nasty dirty job.  The hogs have to be disposed of in some manner.  They kill all of them but the piglets and sometimes somebody will take them to raise.  He doesn't think they can keep the hogs under control as they reproduce so fast.

I thought it interesting that he was using corn for bait but the deer were eating it.  To keep the deer from eating the corn they soak it in diesel...don't bother the hogs at all.
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Offline bucknwfl

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2017, 11:19:10 pm »
If you are not near by and can check traps go with one with the saloon doors. It will keep catching hogs instead of a single trip.  Round shape is best trap but not always easiest.  Put a top on it they can climb out.  Over build it they will test every square inch.   I trapped, hunted and caught them with dogs and shot everyone I saw and took be over 5 years to get them under control.  Well now they have thermal scopes on the market and that is fun.  They can't hide


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Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2017, 07:34:30 am »
the authorities here used mostly live traps.
One of my friends built a large trap patterned after the havahart models.
Caught the same hen turkey several times, I guess she considered it a safe place for a free meal.
I dont remember him ever catching a hog.Another friend set a large snare (illegal here in NY) and something got in it i think a hog but got away and left some hair and skin in it.
The guy that built the live trap also built a 16 foot wire enclosure open at one spot with corn and deer carcasses for bait and leg traps.
I was deer hunting there and saw some action which turned out to be a Red Tail Hawk which flew away with the trap dangling from a leg. Not a good thing.
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Offline gspren

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #18 on: April 09, 2017, 08:52:31 am »
  I've shot and eaten a few and Larry gave good advice although I'd go a bit bigger if making sausage. It may also be that what they are eating makes a difference.
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Offline Texas Ranger

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Re: Dealing with wild hogs
« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2017, 02:32:39 pm »
around here they make pens of bull panels and t-posts, they can get broken down, but you can move them easily enough.     
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