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Author Topic: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops  (Read 3310 times)

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Offline Weekend_Sawyer

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #40 on: February 07, 2017, 12:42:58 pm »
You got the hard part done by putting them in your gallery.
Now as you type your reply look down and click the blue bar that says
"Click here to add photos to post"

Jon
Imagine, Me a Tree Farmer.
Jon, Appalachian American Wannabe. ... and it looks like my dream will come true!

Offline RPowers

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2017, 09:51:12 pm »
Sure is going to make some nice white ash slabs
   
                                                                 Steve

 After that last pic I agree. Pretty stuff regardless.
2013 Woodmizer LT28G25 (sold 2016)
2015 Woodmizer LT50HDD47

Offline josh j

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It worked!
« Reply #42 on: February 11, 2017, 11:23:38 pm »
Yesterday i used the Granberg Mill with the 880.  It worked great for my first time.   I had plenty of help and i hardly had to push on the saw.   

Should i be coating the entire slab with some sort of bug spray or anti fungal something?

I am using wet wood stakes as sticker(temporarily).  what size and type of wood should i be using?

the slabs i cut are 6' long by 3" thick.   i have a real nice 12' log to slab next.   is there a ideal thickness i should be cutting the slabs to?   I would like to make table with these slabs.

i coated all the ends with anchor seal.   also i was using a stihl chain with the 30 degree angle, and every other 2 cutters cut in half, and it gave a fairly smooth cut.   










Offline Darrel

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #43 on: February 11, 2017, 11:43:49 pm »
WOW!!!
1992 LT40HD

The winds of change are blowing at hurricane force and I don't like it but good shall come even though I see not how.

Online LeeB

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #44 on: February 12, 2017, 02:28:46 am »
X2 on the WOW. That last shot is gorgeous.
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, Ford 851 tractor, JD 3032 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton and 2005 1 ton Dodge 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline plantman

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #45 on: March 18, 2017, 12:41:14 pm »
I am doing the same thing as you and just bought a Stihl 880 with 59" bar. Cost me $1900. ( I think I got a good deal ) . I've been looking all over the internet for information about milling and drying lumber and I'm happy to share my findings .
I called this company in Australia with thoughts of buying a double headed bar. http://www.gbforestry.com.au/store/harvester-products/3-4-harvester-bars/titanium-hi-tech-double-ender-bars
However the tech there informed me that power is not always an issue and sometimes a single powerhead works fine. What you need to consider is whether the chain can adequately remove the shavings from the cut and not cut so much that those shavings clog up the cut. Therefore it is essential that you purchase a skip tooth chain. Stihl makes two that will fit their 59" bar. One is a chisel chain with flat ground teeth (some would call them square teeth) . The other chain is a round file chain. I believe the chisel chain is supposed to be more aggressive. Not sure which will stay sharp longer. The chisel chain obviously requires a different file and the average saw shop may not have a flat grinder required for the chisel chain.
Part numbers for these chains are 3668-005-0173 and 3851-005-0173. Forgot which is which.
I have found some good info on treating the wood to prevent mold, fungus, and decay. One product is RV antifreeze (propylene glycol) and this might also help with preventing checking. Another is borax which needs to be mixed in warm water to dissolve it.
And a third is boric acid. Not sure how this differs from borax.
All three are combined in a product called bora-care made by Nisus corporation. But you might make it yourself for less.
http://nisuscorp.com/builders/products/bora-care
http://www.alsnetbiz.com/homeimprovement/homemade.html
http://npic.orst.edu/ingred/ptype/treatwood/borates.html
http://www.dudadiesel.com/search.php?query=boric
http://www.borax.com/products/solubor/
http://www.dynalene.com/br-Ethylene-Glycol-Dynalene-EG-5-Gal-buy-online-p/dy-eg-4.htm

Another company that makes Alaskan chainsaw mills if Panther Pros
http://pantherpros.com/panthermill2.html
Before you use either Alaskan mill I think it's a good idea to remove the metal teeth that screw to the powerhead so that the mill attaches closer to the powerhead and is therefore less likely to bend the bar.

Offline philcoleman

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #46 on: April 13, 2017, 11:35:15 am »
Hey all, I'm brand new to the boards, but look forward to getting to know you.

Josh, I'm pretty sure what you have there is an Oregon White Oak, although Ash is a possibility as well. You can check out the OSU tree identifier to double check me.
https://oregonstate.edu/trees/name_common.html

If you have a picture of the leaf shape that should settle it.

I just brought down two of the same in my back yard in Hillsboro, Oregon and am thinking of slabbing them out as well. It looks like it went pretty well for you. Any tips for me?

-Phil

Offline GrizG

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #47 on: April 13, 2017, 11:52:43 am »

Would stacking/S ticketing in a 20' connex to air dry be good?  I am concerned that it would be to airtight

Is a "connex" a shipping container?
If yes, then your concerns are real.
That wet wood will turn the container into a mushroom factory in short order.
I know someone who put fresh sawn white pine in a connex box... what a mess. Mold all over everything. Definitely a bad idea!

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: 40" oak tree to chain saw mill into table tops
« Reply #48 on: April 13, 2017, 12:09:04 pm »
Glad you didn't cut that log in half, as you would've ended up with two 8ft sections after trimming ends.  For slab tables, 10 feet or more is more typical for a dining table.  The 6ft section will work for a smaller kitchen table or other table. 

Hope you got an oiler for the end of the bar.  I'm assuming if you bought a granberg, it came with one of their double ended bars?  Hopefully you bought the oiler from them as they have the set up all ready to go.  I'm surprised you didn't buy their ripping chain(which is a 10 degree chain).    How about posting a pic of your mill?

That wood looks really nice.  Keep the slabs stacked in the order they were cut so you can book match them easily later.  Assuming you'll need more width than 42, you'd mark the two slabs you're using while stacked and rip them to end up with the desired final width, and then put the two book matched slabs together.

Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!