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Author Topic: Post Oak  (Read 2056 times)

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Offline Den Socling

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2017, 06:03:02 pm »
Well I wrote a schedule for Post Oak in a vacuum kiln without steam. We'll see how it goes. Thank you all.

Offline GeneWengert-WoodDoc

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2017, 08:59:18 am »
Post oak can and commonly does hybridize with at least 10 other species in the white oak group.  (Hybridization is hard to judge at times.). This hybridization means quite a bit of variation in the wood.  Further, the quality is dependent on the environment.  So, post oak lumber is really full of variation and is usually poor in quality.

Contributing to the poor quality is the slow growth, plus the fact that branches, when they die, are so decay resistant that they can persist on the stem for decades.  This means a lot of pin knots in the lumber; the knots will have included bark plus the knot itself is not well attached to the surrounding wood. (In softwoods, we call these black knots.) Grading post oak lumber is difficult using the standard grading rules.  Then there is the distorted grain around the knots.

The best post oak grows in bottomlands in eastern Texas and in the Mississippi River valley in western Mississippi, southeastern Arkansas, and Louisiana.  This is called Delta post oak.  Another fairly good variety is sand post oak that occurs from southeastern Virginia south to central Florida and west to eastern Oklahoma, and south and central Texas . It is most common on coastal plains and is scattered in the Piedmont.  Post oak elsewhere is not too good in quality.
Gene - Author of articles in Sawmill & Woodlot and books: Drying Hardwood Lumber; VA Tech Solar Kiln; Sawing Edging & Trimming Hardwood Lumber. And more

Offline woodweasel

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #22 on: February 21, 2017, 12:29:02 pm »
So where does the red oak come into the picture? Whats the difference?

Online Magicman

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2017, 01:59:01 pm »
Red Oak doesn't come into the picture at all.  Completely different.

The White Oaks are tyloses filled and are sealed from moisture intrusion.  Red Oak pores are open.
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Offline Den Socling

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2017, 04:58:47 pm »
I know I have posted these pictures before and I took them myself so the quality isn't great but here you can see the difference that Magicman mentions.
 

 

 

 

Pretty obvious, isn't it?

Offline Cazzhrdwd

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2017, 05:26:31 pm »
^
Well that's the coolest thing I've seen all day! :)
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Offline Cazzhrdwd

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2017, 05:28:37 pm »
Its why White Oak last longer as s fence board. Then what do we do with all this Red Oak? :)
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Offline Den Socling

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2017, 07:05:22 pm »
Furniture, paneling, cabinets, etc. Patti is having an Amish shop make a kitchen full of Red Oak cabinets.

Offline WDH

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2017, 08:11:46 pm »
Don't you just love tyloses  ;D
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline Den Socling

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2017, 09:36:57 pm »
Yes, I do. They are making money for me.  :D

Offline Den Socling

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2017, 11:01:29 am »
Just for the heck of it, I stuck two 3.5" thick blocks of oak in with walnut slabs. I ran a very mild and wet schedule. In the picture, the one on the left is supposed to be Post Oak. The one on the right is supposed to be Blackjack. As you can see, the results were about as ugly as can be. Does all Blackjack look like that. Normally, if I see Red Oak that is stained like that, it was diseased. Gypsy Moths can do something like that too but not through 3-1/2" of wood! BTW the walnut looked fine.
 

 

Offline WDH

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2017, 03:43:51 pm »
Yes, blackjack has a lot of stain, mineral streaks, and color, and is prone to bacterial infection.
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline Den Socling

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #32 on: April 12, 2017, 04:01:00 pm »
The guy who sent the Post Oak wanted to know why I can dry the White Oak up here but not the Post Oak from OK. I cut a wafer and stuck it under my microscope. First look at our local White Oak.
 

 

The vessels are occluded but they are there. Now look at this Post Oak.
 

 

It's solid!

Offline WDH

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #33 on: April 12, 2017, 04:35:52 pm »
Tyloses on steroids. 
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline Den Socling

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Re: Post Oak
« Reply #34 on: April 14, 2017, 04:42:03 pm »
The same customer asked if he can dry 4" Osage Orange.  ::) I've got some micrographs from the the last time I dried the stuff. It looks about like the Post Oak only it's orange.  :D We decided to dry it at 2" and laminate mantles.