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Author Topic: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn  (Read 2126 times)

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Offline Colonel_O

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2017, 02:22:14 pm »
What did you do with the old siding? Around here you get big dollars for old barn wood and rusty tin roofing. Nice work by the way.

The old siding is in a pile by the side of the barn.  Would love to sell it--I know price varies widely on siding but trying to get a feel for what the market is like. 
Woodmizer LT40HDD35-RS.  US Marine Corps (retired)

Offline Colonel_O

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2017, 02:32:57 pm »
Thanks for sharing!  The Amish are incredibly skilled at carpentry work and most things they do.  Your grandchildren should be enjoying this barn years from now.  Thanks for this incredible post. Did not see in your post what specie of lumber you used for barn siding. I know most folks like white oak, as the pores keep water out making it more durable in the weather.  What specie did you use to rebuild your barn?

We used eastern hemlock.  They already had quite a bit cut down.  We put it up green--will wait for it to season and then paint.  I'm trying to determine what some of the old beams are--chestnut was a predominant hardwood in the 1850s--the blight didn't kill them until the early 1900s...I'd like to think there's some chestnut in that barn but still investigating.  Any tips on identification are welcome.
Woodmizer LT40HDD35-RS.  US Marine Corps (retired)

Offline Magicman

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2017, 05:36:22 pm »
Good job.  I need that crew to work on my barn. 

Barn lumber like that is a hot item in restaurants such as Red Lobster.
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Never allow your "need" to make money to exceed your "desire" to provide quality service.....The Magicman

Offline Colonel_O

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2017, 09:09:40 pm »
Good job.  I need that crew to work on my barn. 

Barn lumber like that is a hot item in restaurants such as Red Lobster.

It's 12 degrees here--I'm sure they would love to head South for awhile!
Woodmizer LT40HDD35-RS.  US Marine Corps (retired)

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2017, 05:37:52 am »
I have an old house from the 1850s period.  Not a lick of chestnut in it, and I'm from Lebanon county.  My guess is that white pine is more apt for your area.  Williamsport was the lumber capital of the world back around that time frame - 1840-1850.  Chestnut grew after the hemlock and white pine were cut off. 
Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

Offline Colonel_O

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2017, 06:48:09 am »
Thanks Ron.  The old siding definitely looks like pine.  Stop by and take a look at the beams if you're in Mifflin County.
Woodmizer LT40HDD35-RS.  US Marine Corps (retired)

Offline Knute

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #26 on: January 08, 2017, 08:15:07 pm »
Great job! Happy to see an old barn being restored. Many are left to fall down and a part of history being lost.

Offline MayIrwinFarm

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #27 on: October 11, 2017, 11:35:29 am »
Colonel O, you can be very proud.  That is beautiful and, I'm sure, very gratifying to see the fruits of your labor!
Semper Fi,
Jim Munroe

Offline Weekend_Sawyer

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #28 on: October 11, 2017, 01:00:37 pm »

Very nice. That barn deserved some sprucing up!

Now my lazy brain red the title as if you were moving into the barn to live, so I'm reading along thinking "When is he going to talk about finishing the interior?" :D

Jon

Imagine, Me a Tree Farmer.
Jon, Appalachian American Wannabe. ... and it looks like my dream will come true!

Offline samandothers

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2017, 10:02:51 am »
How is the sawing going for the remaining sides or did I miss that all sides are now complete?

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Residing a Pennsylvania Barn
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2017, 07:07:09 am »
Colonel, you asked about & degree band hook. 7 degree Its what I use and its a good compromise between 10's and 4's. You may want a few 4's to use on real knotty or hardwoods but sharp 7's will do it all. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece