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Author Topic: Identifying bottlenecks  (Read 5468 times)

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Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #60 on: October 08, 2017, 08:24:27 pm »
Thanks D6c,
I bought a manual toe board for an LT25 to retrofit on my LT15.  I started the install but drilled one hole off and have to fix it.

Does anyone edge with a track saw?
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline paul case

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #61 on: October 08, 2017, 10:52:40 pm »
I have an edger and have had a few. I really like using one vs using the mill to edge boards. I think the track saw idea would be too slow, way slower than say a wm single blade edger. Without lasers and after a little practice your off bearer can keep up with your flitches and it wouldn't take long to get the hang of it.

just my $.02 worth.
PC
life is too short to be too serious. (some idiot)
2013 LT40SHE25 and Riehl edger,  WM 94 LT40 hd E15. Cut my sawing ''teeth'' on an EZ Boardwalk
sawing oak.hickory,ERC,walnut and almost anything else that shows up.
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pc

Offline jcbrotz

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #62 on: October 09, 2017, 05:44:50 am »
Thanks D6c,
I bought a manual toe board for an LT25 to retrofit on my LT15.  I started the install but drilled one hole off and have to fix it.

Does anyone edge with a track saw?

I have the 75 festool tracksaw great saw, edging with one would be the last thing I would want to do with one, but it is a wonderful addition to a woodshop.
2004 woodmizer lt40hd 33hp kubota

Offline YellowHammer

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #63 on: October 09, 2017, 08:43:08 am »
Thanks D6c,
I bought a manual toe board for an LT25 to retrofit on my LT15.  I started the install but drilled one hole off and have to fix it.

Does anyone edge with a track saw?

I have the 75 festool tracksaw great saw, edging with one would be the last thing I would want to do with one, but it is a wonderful addition to a woodshop.
I agree, it's a great tool but its best use is for precision, jointer quality edges, not any kind of mass production. 
Hobby Hardwood Alabama.com
LT40 Diesel Hydraulic, Stihl 028, MS440, MS660, 2 Kilns

Offline Brucer

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #64 on: October 11, 2017, 01:03:03 am »

Of course the problem with bottlenecks is that when you solve one the next one pops up downstream. So now my bottleneck is trimming the boards to finished length. Anyone have any ideas for that?


It could also pop up upstream ;D.

For trimming I used a DeWalt chop saw -- one that swings down, not a slider. I built a small shed for it , 4'x5', open on both sides, with 16' feed tables out both sides. I mounted rollers on the feed tables and put stops on the outfeed (left) side. Stops were located at standard distances from the saw blade and could swing up above the rollers when needed. I could also clamp a stop anywhere on the outfeed table for non-standard sizes.

In operation, I would stack trimmed boards next to the infeed table, sorted by length. When trimming I would lift a board onto the infeed, roll the end under the saw, and cut it square. Then I'd roll it along until it hit the stop (which I'd preset) and trim the other end square. Trimmed pieces were piled on 8x8's and when I was done, I could move the whole works to the drying stacks with the FEL.

I kept a simple wooden bin behind and to one side of the chop saw shed. When I trimmed a board I could just fling the trimmed piece over my shoulder and it would land in the bin. Bin was designed so it could be picked up with the FEL.

Bruce    LT40HDG28 bandsaw with two 6' extensions.
"Complex problems have simple, easy to understand wrong answers."

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #65 on: October 11, 2017, 06:43:10 am »
I mill alone on my bandmill. Boards that need edging are put on close sawhorses and clamped to cants on the mill. In other words if I have a cant that will get an 8" cut I clamp  boards that needs an 8" cut. Sounds complicated, but not really, you edge as you go. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece