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Author Topic: Identifying bottlenecks  (Read 5244 times)

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Offline OlJarhead

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2016, 06:17:10 pm »

This is how we do ours.  Stack em up, rip them down.

 
Here you can see the CANT beside the flitches as I mill the flitches down the CANT.  In this case I've squared the tops, flipped them over and milled them at 4" to leave 1x4's since I was milling a 4" beam at the same time.
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2016, 08:02:15 pm »
Schmism,

   Interesting tool but looks to me like it would slow down the process. Also, I'm mobile and would be afraid I couldn't keep enough batteries charged if I were doing much edging.

Eric,

   I think your pictures show same techniques I use. The first with just the flitches are hard for me to keep square. The second with flitches by the cant work well and removing individual finished board gets to be a pain but increases yield. Also since I'm cutting standard thicknesses (1-1/8" on my Simple set is most common) such as 4/4 each new flitch is now a random width board. Example if first were 7-3/4", next would be 6-5/8", 5.5", 4-3/8", etc.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline WDH

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2016, 08:22:18 pm »
An edger is a splendid thing.  Kinda like fuel injection versus points and a carburetor.  I will never, ever, go back  :).  If you want to handle flitches and edge on the mill, that will make you sleep better at night, or it will kill you, or both  :)
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Offline Bruno of NH

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2016, 08:28:24 pm »
I'm going to get an edger for sure :)
Edging on the mill is my least favorite thing in my milling .
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Offline WoodenHead

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2016, 08:34:04 pm »
Leveling logs and edging flitches was and still is my greatest bottleneck.  To solve the leveling problem I switched from a manual mill to a hydraulic.  I still spend more time than I would like to level a log, but it is much easier and quicker on a hydraulic mill. 

To solve the flitch problem I thought I would purchase an edger.  So I did.  However, working by myself I did not find it any faster than edging on the mill.  And in some cases you can make interesting curves if the flitch is odd shaped and doesn't go through as you expect.   ::)   An edger works best with multiple helpers.

I am thinking about selling my edger since I never use it.  Now I just consider edging on the mill part of the job.  I edge after each log.  Hydraulics go a long way in helping to stand up the flitches.



 

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2016, 09:54:53 pm »
I tried the cant edging method today on a 6ft walnut log.  I only had 4 boards to do, and could do 2 of them at once.  I didn't have my helper today, but if I did I'm sure I could have aligned all 3 and got him to clamp it while I held them.  It did work better because I was able to use the top of the cant as a reference to align the boards.  ...and the log was only 12" but I will end up with two 4"x8" pieces of brace stock with some extra material on them so after the outer surface dries a bit, I can plane them to actual dimension.  Sorry I only took a pic after the opening face cut.
 

 
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Offline Verticaltrx

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2016, 10:58:55 pm »
This...

   Another FF tip/step I am working on for my home sawing is building and putting a couple of sawhorses by my mill and staging flitches by width to gang edge them faster and more efficiently. If this works well I may build fold up sawhorses to take with me to customer sites.

That method works quite well for edging and it is what I do. My sawhorses are the same height as the mill bed and positioned parallel to the mill just beyond the sawdust pile (operator side of the mill.)  You want them close enough so you and a helper can just swing the boards over to the sawhorses and back without much lifting or moving. If by yourself you just pick the flitch off the mill and swing around 180* and put it on the sawhorses. When I get a flitch I set it on the sawhorses, organizing them as I go by approximate width and those with one edge already. Then when I decide to edge them, generally every 2-3 logs worth I stack a bunch on the mill, like 10-12 or so, and make a pass. Unclamp, take out any that are done (those that already had one edge) pack the rest back together and use my cant hook to flip the whole bundle over. Then saw again, unclamp and take out the wide ones, so on and so forth. It sounds like a lot of work, but it goes fast. I can edge a bundle of 10 boards in just a few minutes. I really don't mind edging, it adds up board footage fast.

As for leveling logs, WM makes a what they call a 'taper wedge' for the LT15. Slides over the bunks and can be moved in and out to level the log. You do have to still use something to pry the log up, but it looks easier than fiddling with blocks or wooden wedges. I don't have one yet, but it's the next thing I am going to buy for my mill. You can get them through parts and I think they are only about $50-60.
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Offline YellowHammer

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2016, 11:27:15 pm »
I had a taper wedge for my manual LT15.  It was very easy to use, and a Logrite was the perfect prybar.
Later, I mounted a small car jack on the rails with some angle iron, and it also worked very well.


With my hydraulic mill, the easy way to gauge level for parallel bark sawing is to install drag back fingers.  Start the head at one end of the log, adjust the toe boards where the fingers just touch the bark, barely touching the surface of the log.  Then traverse the head and adjust the toe boards until the fingers touch at the same height the whole length of the log.  With the hydraulics anywhere modification, the bark can be leveled in the time it takes to drag the head across the log while jogging the toeboards, maybe a few seconds. 
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Offline red

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2016, 11:35:36 pm »
I used scissor jacks
We have a lot of good boys and girls in harms way
lets all support them and their familys.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2016, 08:05:33 am »
Edging on a sawmill is slow. I could almost saw another log by the time I recover all those boards. I try to do my edging after each log. Most times log size vary, so I can look and remember how I want to do. I have sawed out 3-4-5 logs and then came back and did the edging. Seems like it took me longer because I did not know what I had.I can see how sorting to size would help.
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2016, 08:06:55 am »
Vtrx,

   If I were sawing at home I'd almost certainly be working alone but the sawhorse system should still work well. When you edge groups of flitches do you edge them beside a cant for better stability? One problem we have not mentioned in edging is the problem with clamping a large number at one time. Even though I try to put an already squared edge down next to the clamp and dogs (if no cant) if too many rough edges in a stack the whole stack wants to climb up under pressure. Using the cant helps get a better bite on the stack and reduces this risk. It gets worst when cutting stickers and want to cut that last 1X1 next to the rails.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Chop Shop

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2016, 10:53:33 am »
Constantly reading these kinds of threads is exactly why I have a MobileDimesion.

One man, NO edging.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2016, 03:38:18 pm »
Not many MobileDimesions on this side of the states. ;)  I saw one at show here in Maine. I was quite impressed by it.
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Online 4x4American

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #33 on: May 19, 2016, 08:09:42 pm »
I tailed a mobile dimension mill for 3 years straight.  I didn't stop to go to sleep or eat or nothin!  Lol

That mill will put a hurtin on the tail man..
especially without any roller tables and you are stacking 20' away...and yea, you might not have to worry about having an edger, but, the guy tailing has to pull and handle two or three pieces sometimes depending on how the saws are setup.
Boy, back in my day..

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2016, 08:12:34 pm »
I really like their use of hockey pucks in their mill too btw.  Made
me laugh but they work good, I mean, ask any Canookian, a hockey puck is about the best thing since they invented the wheel.
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Offline WDH

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #35 on: May 19, 2016, 08:29:42 pm »
The problem with edging on the mill is having to handle the boards so much.  Tote, stack, re-tote stack, flip, stack, re-tote, etc. 
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Offline Dan_Shade

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #36 on: May 19, 2016, 08:43:58 pm »
I stack flitches on the loading arms.

I edge as many as I can at once.

Also, I find flipping cants 180 to open the second face to be more efficient than rotating 90
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #37 on: May 19, 2016, 08:52:39 pm »
I stack flitches on the loading arms.

I edge as many as I can at once.

Also, I find flipping cants 180 to open the second face to be more efficient than rotating 90

Dan,

   I think I often do what you describe. Open 1st face, cut 1 or 2 flitches, flip 180, open face, take off a flitch or two, flip 90*, open the face, take off 1, sometimes 2 flitches, flip 180* take the face off to my mark, may get 1 more flitch and start cutting edged boards. When I get down to about a 3-4 inches, stop and edge my flitches then reset to my mark and cut to the deck.
Howard Green
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Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Sixacresand

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #38 on: May 19, 2016, 09:25:23 pm »
Nobody has mentioned bottlenecks caused by folks/kin (non customers) who drop by  to talk and visit.  Seems like people who aren't doing anything, want everyone else to do nothing too.   :D

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Re: Identifying bottlenecks
« Reply #39 on: May 19, 2016, 10:26:46 pm »
Nobody has mentioned bottlenecks caused by folks/kin (non customers) who drop by  to talk and visit.  Seems like people who aren't doing anything, want everyone else to do nothing too.   :D

 :D :D :D  Yup!!  For the first time on monday I shooed a guy away.  I had a wm tech looking at my sawmill trying to figure out some tissues I've been having and this guy comes up out of nowhere in some police looking suburban, and starts asking me all sorts of personal questions and he did ask one thing I thought was great, he asked me if my lumber had been through a planer lol.  Lumber that was sticker stacked at the end of my roller table behind the sawmill.  We're out in the open on the edge of a hay field, do you see a planer anywhere!! Lol
Boy, back in my day..