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Author Topic: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.  (Read 5425 times)

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Offline Dave Shepard

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Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« on: November 07, 2015, 05:16:30 pm »
Has anyone done this? I lost one of my Milwaukee batts this summer, and I was going to retool with Makita, as they seemed to be the popular choice at work. My boss gave me his old Milwaukee tools, with a bunch of dead batteries, so I bought a couple of new ones and now seem to be committed to Milwaukee tools. The more people I talk to, the more support I get for Milwaukee, although I think Makita would be fine, too. I now have a bunch of batteries that won't take a charge, and I was thinking of rebuilding them.
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Offline Magicman

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2015, 05:34:16 pm »
I have bought new batteries and rebuilt a few, but finding high ah replacements is a chore plus expensive.  After you add shipping to that, I felt that I was better off buying a warranted replacement.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2015, 05:39:24 pm »
Last time I went to try this I found pre-built after market batteries on eBay were about the same cost as buying the cells. That was for a Dewault.

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2015, 05:42:10 pm »
There used to be a business near me that rebuilt batteries, but I think they moved. The 3ah batts from Home Depot are $140/pair, and the new 5.0 are $129 each. I'd like to know why the Festool 5.2 are only $45 each. ??? I guess if I can get a couple of years out of a pair that may just be a cost of having the convenience.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2015, 08:42:14 am »
i bought the big mikta set 8 yrs ago 18v most of the tools were pretty good. the drill has been fixed several times. new gear box new  chuck gets hot but it still works. the flash light needed a new circuit board. the plastic ring that holds the lenses and bulb in. if you get it tight enough to hold the bulb in it breaks. batteries might last a yr at best.  i have some 12v Milwaukee. the greese gun is over 3yrs old still running on the battery that came with it 

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2015, 09:58:32 am »
Been there done that...
Some things I learned.
Most all take the same cells inside.
So what I do is search E-bay for cheap battery's of any make.
Then I take them apart for the cells and put them in my battery case.
You can reprieve old battery's by hooking a high amp battery charger to you old dead battery's.
I only do this for a few sec. Be very careful. I was told they can come apart doing this.
It has never happen to me and I've done a lot of them.
They will then again take a charge.
The newest battery's have electronics inside. I have not messed with them.
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Offline JB Griffin

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2015, 01:24:54 pm »
I'd like to know why the Festool 5.2 are only $45 each. ???

I guess they feel sorry for the people that spend $300-$600 on a bare tool. :o
Supposed to be the best there is though.
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Offline jcbrotz

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2015, 05:54:41 pm »
I'd like to know why the Festool 5.2 are only $45 each. ???

I guess they feel sorry for the people that spend $300-$600 on a bare tool. :o
Supposed to be the best there is though.

They make their money on the tool not the batteries if I had the money all my tools would be festool no comparison to quality. That said I own lots of dewalt and they don't want to support 18v anymore but are finally making a 20v-18v adapter.

To answer the question they are tough to get right with most better know how to soider sending them in to be rebuilt is also an option dewalt isn't to bad with that.;
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2015, 06:08:09 pm »
I have four of the small batteries that won't charge. I might look into sending them out if it's not too expensive. After looking around, I might just buy a new tool with the big batteries, some kits are not much more than two 5.0 batteries outright.
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Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2015, 08:58:18 pm »
Been there done that...
Some things I learned.
Most all take the same cells inside.
So what I do is search E-bay for cheap battery's of any make.
Then I take them apart for the cells and put them in my battery case.
You can reprieve old battery's by hooking a high amp battery charger to you old dead battery's.
I only do this for a few sec. Be very careful. I was told they can come apart doing this.
It has never happen to me and I've done a lot of them.
They will then again take a charge.
The newest battery's have electronics inside. I have not messed with them.





I have some I'm going to try that on. Just have to see which one is + and-- on the batt.
Thanks.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2015, 01:34:35 am »
Been there done that...
Some things I learned.
Most all take the same cells inside.
So what I do is search E-bay for cheap battery's of any make.
Then I take them apart for the cells and put them in my battery case.
You can reprieve old battery's by hooking a high amp battery charger to you old dead battery's.
I only do this for a few sec. Be very careful. I was told they can come apart doing this.
It has never happen to me and I've done a lot of them.
They will then again take a charge.
The newest battery's have electronics inside. I have not messed with them.





I have some I'm going to try that on. Just have to see which one is + and-- on the batt.
Thanks.

Put it back on the charger for a few min. That will give it enough charge to put a meter on it to find the post post.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2015, 07:17:21 am »
I had two batteries rebuilt for my portacable power drill at Batteries plus place not to far from me.
One of them I had to take back twice to get them to fix an internal connection that kept breaking off for no reason.
But since they were replaced they seem ok.

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Offline 21incher

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2015, 07:57:23 am »
I purchased a Makita 18 V Li Ion set a little while ago and would never purchase another. The batteries just die with no warning. You place them in the charger and lights start flashing and they will never charge again. This was after just owning the set for a little over a year. :)
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2015, 07:35:08 pm »
I purchased a Makita 18 V Li Ion set a little while ago and would never purchase another. The batteries just die with no warning. You place them in the charger and lights start flashing and they will never charge again. This was after just owning the set for a little over a year. :)

If they do that put them on a car charger for a short time.
That will fix that problem.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2015, 08:16:29 pm »
I purchased a Makita 18 V Li Ion set a little while ago and would never purchase another. The batteries just die with no warning. You place them in the charger and lights start flashing and they will never charge again. This was after just owning the set for a little over a year. :)
mine did the same thing. if i am real lucky they last a year

Offline clearcut

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2015, 08:41:18 pm »
Quote
If they do that put them on a car charger for a short time.
That will fix that problem.

Have a fully charged fire extinguisher at hand. Overheated Lithium Ion batteries can burst into intense flame. Lithium ion chemistry is more complex and potentially dangerous than Nickel Metal Hydride or NiCad.

LiOn batteries are also more difficult to rebuild. Each has a charge controlling circuit board that is matched to a brands charger.


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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2015, 10:55:32 pm »
Has anyone done this? I lost one of my Milwaukee batts this summer, and I was going to retool with Makita, as they seemed to be the popular choice at work. My boss gave me his old Milwaukee tools, with a bunch of dead batteries, so I bought a couple of new ones and now seem to be committed to Milwaukee tools. The more people I talk to, the more support I get for Milwaukee, although I think Makita would be fine, too. I now have a bunch of batteries that won't take a charge, and I was thinking of rebuilding them.

Dave, I have rebuilt several battery packs.  Here is what I've learned:

1 - you can rebuild NiCad and Nickly Metal Hydrade battery packs.  You can't rebuilt Lithium Ion packs because the electronic circuitry inside must be matched to the batteries.

2.  Cells are pretty inexpensive, but it's hard for an individual to solder them in such a way that the connections don't take up more room than OEM.  If the pack has some room inside, this is not a problem.  However if the pack is very tight, it can be a pain.  I recently had to discard a battery pack because I could not get the connections as tight as what came in it to where the new pack would fit back inside the tight housing.

3 - Buy the batteries that have the tabs on them - much easier to solder them together.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2015, 08:50:16 am »
   I have had good luck getting batteries rebuilt at a local shop, 14V Makita, both times the rebuilt battery was better than the original. (more Amp-Hrs).
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2015, 11:01:40 am »
At this point, I don't think I'll bother. HD has an M18 Fuel kit with hammer drill, impact driver, and two 5.0 batteries for $399, with $150 credit towards another Milwaukee product. That is to enticing to pass up.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2015, 01:13:07 am »
Don't mess with Lithium Ion batteries.

- They are meant to be charged in two stages ... constant current to start with, then constant voltage.
- If you overcharge them, you are risking thermal runaway which will destroy the battery and will often set it on fire.
- If you expose them to excess heat, they will short internally, causing thermal runaway.
- If you short them, they will overheat, causing thermal runaway.

Each battery contains an electronic circuit that is tuned to that specific battery. This is what controls the charging.

The batteries will deteriorate over time, even if you don't use them. You can slow this process down by keeping them cool. I store spare batteries in a plastic container in the fridge.

Ordinary Lithium Ion batteries shouldn't be charged in temperatures is below freezing. Doing so will cause a metallic barrier to form inside the cells, greatly decreasing the life of the battery.
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Offline r.man

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2015, 07:36:35 am »
One interesting thing I can say about older Dewalts is that the 12 volt batteries will fit in the 9.6 drill, although you have to give the battery a firm hit to make it go in.  The drill works about the same as with a 9.6. I was looking at the fit of an 18 volt battery in a 12 volt drill and I expect if a plastic shoulder was removed from the battery that it would work. My wife jump started her E-reader that wouldn't take a charge. Used a 9 volt battery and a paper clip for a brief jolt. Sounded like the charging system didn't recognize the battery because it was so dead.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2015, 01:51:34 am »
My SIL hooks up his 18V stuff to a car battery all time. May run a little slower but runs just the same.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #22 on: November 15, 2015, 08:35:30 pm »
Ordinary Lithium Ion batteries shouldn't be charged in temperatures is below freezing. Doing so will cause a metallic barrier to form inside the cells, greatly decreasing the life of the battery.

That's a point I didn't know.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #23 on: November 15, 2015, 10:19:39 pm »
Well most of the time we'd probably keep the charger in the house or the shop, so it wouldn't be an issue. I have been known to charge batteries in my unheated garage (but not in winter).

I did some research last year on Ni-Cad versus Lithium Ion batteries. The head of the tool department at the local building supply store was telling me stuff about Ni-Cads that I knew was complete nonsense.  :P It turns out that what he was telling me about Lithium Ion batteries was complete nonsense as well ::).
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2015, 07:12:42 pm »
I haven't found a company that will rebuild my old batteries, but have been doing a lot of research into Milwaukee's Fuel line of 18 volt tools. I will only be buying Fuel tools from now on. I have a hatred for power cords, and have always wanted cordless tools that would rival the corded versions. The Fuel tools do that, from everything I've seen, which is multiple reviews and videos from different sources. I have the 1/2" Fuel impact wrench, and I believe it will completely eliminate the need for my air impact, which was no slouch. Battery technology is advancing very fast. You can already get 5.0 ah batteries, and in January, Milwaukee is introducing 6.0 and 9.0 versions as well. So the relevance to the thread is that with enough different tools in the M18 line, I plan on adding 7 1/4" circ saw and sawzall, fairly soon, I figure that having to spend a certain amount of money on batteries per year, (or every few years and spreading it out to a yearly value), is probably reasonable in comparison to the amount that I will be using these tools. Not having to have a generator, cords etc. has a petty significant value as well.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2015, 08:19:17 pm »
I've got the Milwaukee M18 Fuel Sawzall and 1/2" Hammer Drill/Driver. I have their compact impact driver on order. They are GREAT tools. The "M18 Fuel" versions of their tools are significantly better than the plain "M18" tools (without the "Fuel" in the name).
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #26 on: November 30, 2015, 08:33:32 pm »
Did you order the new 2753 impact driver? It looks really impressive. I'll probably be getting the gen 2 hammer drill/impact set this winter.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2015, 08:44:01 pm »
Yep, the 2753. Interested to try the self tapping screw mode. Ordered the bare tool. Waiting for the higher capacity batteries to come out - I have enough of the 3 and 4.0 batteries.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2015, 05:54:59 pm »
I just picked up the 2nd gen hammer drill, impact set with two 5.0 batteries, and the 2731 7 1/4" saw. The saw will get used tomorrow. Looking forward to not tripping over a cord. ;D
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2015, 07:50:44 pm »
post some pictures of these tools. Please?

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2015, 08:59:59 pm »
Jim -

You can find some info on the tools on Milwaukee's web site Milwaukee M18 cordless tools
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #31 on: December 09, 2015, 10:50:33 pm »
I'm really curious to see how the cordless circular saw works out. My boss owned one when I worked for him 11 years ago. It would give us a dozen or so cuts in 1x8 lumber before the battery would die. Would barely get started in a piece of 2" lumber before it would stall out :(.

Higher voltage and better battery technology may make a circular saw feasible.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2015, 10:56:56 pm »
I read a tool review a while back, and the Milwaukee 6 1/2" circular saw got very good reviews. The only complaint was that it was not a 7 1/4" saw - which they've now come out with.

I owned one of their 6 1/2" circular saws with the older NiCad batteries. It cut fairly well when the batteries were in good condition. The new lithium batteries last much longer, and they have higher capacity batteries out now.

For the best performance and battery life, you want the "M18 Fuel" tools. The plain "M18" tools are pretty good, but the "Fuel" version is noticeably better.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2015, 12:12:07 am »
A little off topic but last week I was in an Amish store and was looking at
air powered saws and drills. They even had air powered sawsalls.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #34 on: December 10, 2015, 08:01:31 am »
The reviews I've seen for the M18 7 1/4" saw show that it will cut well over 200 2x4s or almost 300 feet of osb with a 4.0 battery. I have two 5.0 batteries with the drill kit, so I don't think I will run out of juice working alone. With a spare battery on the charger, should be able to work continuously. I tried it with a 3.0 last night, and it cut great, but you could get it to overload and shut off if you really pushed it. I think a bigger battery may provide more juice, and keep it from shutting off.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #35 on: December 11, 2015, 01:43:44 pm »
Experimented a little last night with the saw. 25 cuts in white pine full 2x8 got the battery gauge to drop down to three bulbs. That's 400 square inches on about a quarter battery (5.0ah). Reviews say 230 to 260 cut in 2x4 (1,300"2, roughly with 3.0ah). That's pretty impressive.

Just tried the 2753 impact. It's really fast. You have to push down just so the screw doesn't drive itself off the bit. :D
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #36 on: December 11, 2015, 02:31:14 pm »
My 2753 impact was delayed when they shipped me the wrong tool. It may be a while before I get to test it, since it's a Christmas present from my wife (surprise!)
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #37 on: December 14, 2015, 11:02:10 am »
I've been using the 2704 drill from the kit today to bore peg holes. I'm blown away at the power. It will run a 7/8" ship auger through larch on high like butter. My older M18 drills just don't run a ship auger.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #38 on: May 21, 2016, 08:00:14 am »
I've had half a year using my Fuel tools, and I am very impressed. We end trimmed all of the roofing before installing, trimmed all the boards on the roof after installation, cut all of the bracing boards, and a few other miscellaneous things, and still have some charge left on one 5.0 battery. I'd say cordless saws have come a long way. My friend has been using his original M18 drill to screw the roof down, and it's slow, and eats up batteries like John Pinette at a Chinese buffet. :D

 

 
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #39 on: May 21, 2016, 08:37:17 am »
Use the 1/4" impact for driving screws. You'll never use a drill again.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #40 on: May 21, 2016, 08:51:14 am »
I offered my gen2 Fuel impact, he declined. It would have been faster, and used way less batteries.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #41 on: May 21, 2016, 10:28:11 am »
So I never did get my Milwaukee 2753 Impact driver. After they shipped the wrong tool, the correct one was on back order. I finally told them to cancel the order. I'm now debating buying the 2753 or the 2757. 

The 2753 has several different speed modes and a "self tapping screw" mode you can select via 4 buttons on the tool.  The 2757 has Milwaukee's "One Key" system: It also has 4 buttons for different speed and torque profiles, but you can customize the profiles for speed and torque by using a smart phone running their One Key app.

Has anyone used one of Milwaukee's "One Key" tools? If so, what did you think?

(My apologies to the OP for the topic drift.)
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #42 on: May 21, 2016, 10:33:01 am »
There are reviews on YouTube. Basically, the gist was that if you were a competent power tool user, it was redundant, but if you had a bunch of "live bodies" running you tools, being able to dial in the tool could be handy. In delicate work, you can send a screw through the work and out the other side in a heartbeat.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #43 on: May 21, 2016, 10:48:52 am »
There are reviews on YouTube. Basically, the gist was that if you were a competent power tool user, it was redundant, but if you had a bunch of "live bodies" running you tools, being able to dial in the tool could be handy. In delicate work, you can send a screw through the work and out the other side in a heartbeat.

Yeah. It would mostly be me and one other guy using it. We do solar PV installations. I was thinking the programmable bit might be helpful for repetitive tightening of multiple identical fasteners. If the torque limits worked OK, we could figure out a setting which put it just under the torque spec for a fastener, which would speed up the process greatly when we come back around with a torque wrench for the final tightening. If it worked well enough, we might be able to set it to the final torque spec, and just spot check a percentage of the fasteners.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #44 on: May 22, 2016, 02:00:29 pm »
I want to purchase a Milwaukee 18 volt 61/2'' saw for use at the mill as well as job site.The kit I am looking at is the 2630-22 M18,$349.00.The saw gets good reviews but I was wondering if anyone had experience with this saw.

As for as rebuilding batteries Primecell rebuilds them.I have no first hand experience with them
Mick
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #45 on: May 22, 2016, 02:29:04 pm »
John Mc, I have wore out 3 different brands of drills with clutches over the years and I have found that to a certain degree tightness depends on battery charge at time of use. I expect almost any clutch based drill would get your torque close with a decently observant operator. Requires you to listen to the drill and assess based on the sound.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #46 on: May 22, 2016, 02:58:20 pm »
I want to purchase a Milwaukee 18 volt 61/2'' saw for use at the mill as well as job site.The kit I am looking at is the 2630-22 M18,$349.00.The saw gets good reviews but I was wondering if anyone had experience with this saw.

I prefer the M18 Fuel variants of their tools. They seem to have better torque and battery life. The 2730-22 would be the M18 Fuel version of the saw you named. It costs $399, another $50 above the price you listed.

If you need a larger saw, they also sell a 7 1/4" saw: the M18 Fuel 2731-22 for $429

I own one of their 6 1/2" Nicad-based circular saws. I was happy with it, but it's not the last Nicad Milwaukee tool I own. I'll eventually replace it with a lithium battery saw. I've used the 2730, and will eventually get either that one or the 2731.

NOTE: the 2630 seems to sell with their 3.0 Amp-hour batteries. They are good batteries, but their current standard for high capacity batteries is 5.0 Amp-Hour.  I have several 3.0 A-H batteries, and one 4.0 A-H. The difference in battery life is very noticeable. If I can't buy a new saw with the 5.0 batteries, I'll just buy the bare tool and get new batteries when my existing ones wear out.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #47 on: May 22, 2016, 03:05:00 pm »
John Mc, I have wore out 3 different brands of drills with clutches over the years and I have found that to a certain degree tightness depends on battery charge at time of use. I expect almost any clutch based drill would get your torque close with a decently observant operator. Requires you to listen to the drill and assess based on the sound.

I agree. I use the clutch on my Millwaukee cordless drill/driver now, but it's big and can be awkward when working on a roof. The compact impact drivers are smaller and lighter. I don't think they have a clutch adjustment, however. I do want to get an impact driver at one of these points (which is why I had the 2753 on order), if I can get one that also has adjustable torque, it could do double duty for me.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #48 on: May 22, 2016, 06:08:13 pm »
John,
 Thanks for your input.I found the 2730 kit for $359.00 on Ebay and have placed the order.
 Mick
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #49 on: May 22, 2016, 07:04:37 pm »
I notice that when I use a 3.0 on the 2731 saw, I can't push it as hard. Milwaukee was supposed to introduce a 6.0 battery the same size as the 5.0, and a 9.0 battery that was a bit bigger in January, but haven't checked up on that. Non-Fuel tools definitely use more juice then the Fuel ones.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #50 on: May 22, 2016, 07:09:26 pm »
I use 2 6 1/2 circ saws every day from March till the end of December cutting 1x shiplap and 2x lumber in my exterior repair condo contract . I love lithium ion makes my job much easier :)
People don't want you using there power :(
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #51 on: May 22, 2016, 08:02:10 pm »
...I found the 2730 kit for $359.00 on Ebay and have placed the order.

That's a great price. How many batteries, and what size?
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #52 on: May 22, 2016, 08:23:20 pm »
John,
 Two 4.0 batteries in the kit.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #53 on: May 23, 2016, 05:29:19 pm »
The red Freud blades make the circ saws battery's last much longer .
The coating cuts down on the friction and they stay shard a long time .
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #54 on: May 23, 2016, 06:01:01 pm »
That's good to know. The one that comes on the saw seems to be pretty good also.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #55 on: May 23, 2016, 07:30:26 pm »
The Freud Diablo blades are what we use almost exclusively.I've never owned a cordless saw,just ordered one yesterday and my buddies at work informed me it was the gateway drug,guess I'll be going in for treatment soon. :D
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #56 on: May 24, 2016, 08:39:28 am »
What rubs me wrong about the battery issues...the older Ni Cad batteries have memory effects and don't last.  So you end up with junk batteries and tools that are still good.  I have Bosch.  Then they really expect you to buy the whole new system of new tools and Li Ion batteries.  They could easily make an adapter to adapt the Li Ion batteries to the older tools, but they won't because they want to sell you the whole new tool line.  It's really wasteful to get rid of all those perfectly good tools. 
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #57 on: May 24, 2016, 10:21:00 am »
DeWalt does make an adapter to use lithium batts with the old tools.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #58 on: May 24, 2016, 10:27:20 am »
Thinking about that a little more, with the advance in brushless tools, upgrading tools is worth it. In the case of Milwaukee, there are other advantages to the latest tools. For instance if you push a tool too hard, it will shut down, as well as shut down when the battery gets too low or before you overheat it.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #59 on: May 24, 2016, 10:33:10 am »
Thinking about that a little more, with the advance in brushless tools, upgrading tools is worth it. In the case of Milwaukee, there are other advantages to the latest tools. For instance if you push a tool too hard, it will shut down, as well as shut down when the battery gets too low or before you overheat it.

It's that communication between the tool and the battery that can make it tough to adapt some of the newer Lithium-ion batteries to work with older NiCad tools. THese days, there is more to the batteries than just putting out power.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #60 on: May 24, 2016, 05:40:42 pm »
The brushless tools perform much better it's like night and day .
I thought it was bull untill I got some and used them :)
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #61 on: December 16, 2016, 03:42:27 pm »
10" Fuel SCMS, 2 9.0 batteries, $599.00 at the Depot. 400 cuts per charge. I was talking to a contractor yesterday that just got the sawzall with a 9.0 battery and he has been taking down small trees with it. Cordless tools have come a long way! 8)
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #62 on: December 27, 2016, 04:25:51 pm »
  About once or twice a year our Interstate Battery guy will tell us that they are running a special on rebuilding tool / jump pack batteries.  Their sale is normally a week or so after I've replaced a dead jump pack with a new one, or bought a new power tool  :(
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #63 on: March 11, 2017, 04:49:56 pm »
Home Depot's marketing department must be made up of reformed drug dealers. :D M18 Fuel Sawzall or Fuel 7 1/4" saw, 1-9.0 battery and a fast charger for $249.00. Separately, the Sawzall is $199, the battery is $199, and the charger is $79. They really know how to lure people in.  :)
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #64 on: March 11, 2017, 07:24:04 pm »
Makes me wish I had waited to buy my M18 Fuel Sawzall or 7 1/4" circular saw.  THise 9.0 A-H batteries are big, but having at least one of them would be nice... just not $200 nice.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #65 on: March 11, 2017, 07:43:19 pm »
I already had the circ saw, so I got the sawzall. I think I'm going to get the scms later this year, then I'll have three 9.0 batteries. I'll be able to run an entire job site all day without recharging. I wouldn't run the drill or impact on a 9.0, you can go so far on a 5.0, and they are lighter. I'm thinking about the true color work lights. They wouldd be a good use for a 9.0.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #66 on: March 11, 2017, 10:14:20 pm »
scms ??
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #67 on: March 11, 2017, 10:16:35 pm »
Sliding compound miter saw  ;D :)
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #68 on: March 11, 2017, 10:34:24 pm »
Didn't know they even made a cordless version. I'll have to check it out.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #69 on: March 12, 2017, 06:31:00 am »
They make 9.0 batteries now? I built our house with my 5 year old M18 tools, and always seemed to have plenty of battery life. With 5 batteries, I never used them all in one day. I can't remember the last time I had my corded tools out. I recently bought the big 1/2" impact wrench for car and tractor work, and it's a beast. I would have never thought that a cordless tool could have that kind of power. It runs circles around my old pneumatic impact.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #70 on: March 12, 2017, 10:49:56 am »
One thing Lithium Ion batteries don't like is extended disuse. You don't have to run them all the way down like you did with the old NiCad batteries, but they do like to have electricity flowing in and out of them from time to time.

If you know you'll be storing them for and extended period, it's generally recommended to store them about half full, rather than all the way charged or discharged.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #71 on: March 12, 2017, 12:37:03 pm »
I was impressed with the 7 1/4" saw with the 5.0 battery. With the 9.0, it's even better. You can hear the difference just spinning the blade. I had to ram it into a chunk of pine dunnage to get it to stall. I'm looking for some oak now.

Tooling up with the latest tools and bigger batteries is a chunk of money, but for serious use, they really do "cut the cord" as Milwaukee claims. I was thinking about a truck battery with an inverter to charge the M18 packs, but I now have enough batteries, and six chargers, too, that I don't need to recharge during the day.
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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #72 on: March 12, 2017, 01:02:13 pm »
Just bought a dewalt 40v chainsaw to use at the mill. thought it would be a good idea to have a spare battery and found one but it was 199 bucks.
same site had a scratch and dent leaf blower with battery and charger for 209.
I now have my spare battery plus a leaf blower that i cant find a sratch or dent on.
I have a ridgid drill that has lifetime guarantee on the drill charger and batteries.
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Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #73 on: March 13, 2017, 08:19:03 pm »
I already had the circ saw, so I got the sawzall. I think I'm going to get the scms later this year, then I'll have three 9.0 batteries. I'll be able to run an entire job site all day without recharging. I wouldn't run the drill or impact on a 9.0, you can go so far on a 5.0, and they are lighter. I'm thinking about the true color work lights. They would be a good use for a 9.0.

Later this year turned out to be today.  :D I didn't get much time to play with the saw, but what I am seeing so far is very impressive. In addition to cutting boards on a job site, I also want to cut dunnage and stickers at the mill. I made a bunch of cuts on a piece of 3x4 thinking I would see the battery drop pretty fast. It didn't budge, still four lights. I cut a bunch of dry cherry 2x6 to see if it would cut without burning, it did great. Still four lights on the battery. Then I made about ten cuts pushing it hard to see how much it would take to make it bog. It didn't really bog down, in fact it cut as well as any of the DeWalt corded saws I've used. I checked the battery immediately after and it was down to three lights, but when I pressed it again two seconds later it was back to four. The only downside is that it's a ten inch, not a twelve.

Cut in black cherry with the 60t blade provided. No burning.
 

 
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Offline jcbrotz

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #74 on: March 24, 2017, 04:46:20 am »
Just bought a dewalt 40v chainsaw to use at the mill. thought it would be a good idea to have a spare battery and found one but it was 199 bucks.
same site had a scratch and dent leaf blower with battery and charger for 209.
I now have my spare battery plus a leaf blower that i cant find a sratch or dent on.
I have a ridgid drill that has lifetime guarantee on the drill charger and batteries.

petefrom bearswamp how do you like the dewalt chainsaw? I have been thinking heavily about one of these.
2004 woodmizer lt40hd 33hp kubota

Offline John Mc

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #75 on: March 24, 2017, 10:36:12 am »
...I think I'm going to get the scms later this year, then I'll have three 9.0 batteries. I'll be able to run an entire job site all day without recharging.

Later this year turned out to be today.  :D I didn't get much time to play with the saw, but what I am seeing so far is very impressive.

Have you had a chance to use that Sliding Compound Miter Saw yet? I'm curious if it's still working out for you. My wife does a bit of woodworking. Her miter saw is a garage sale special that we got for $15 (really more of a carpenter's chop saw - and  cheap one at that - than a real woodworking tool). It cuts, but it's not a very rigid frame, so the cuts are not always accurate unless you are very careful.

She would probably use it 95% of the time in the shop. I had been thinking of getting her a decent 12" corded saw, but I see that Home Depot is having a sale on the Milwaukee M18 Fuel SCMS: buy one that comes with a 9.0 AH battery & rapid charger, and get another 9.0 AH battery free. (All our chargers are the standard charger, so the rapid would be nice, as would the extra 9.0 battery.)  I've not really started shopping for the 12" corded version, but this price is less than Milwaukee's 12" corded scms, and about the same as the Dewalt (I don't know if either of them are good saws or not).

So now I'm torn: 10" Cordless, for those few occasions when we'd use it portable, or corded with a 12" blade. She doesn't do a lot of big stuff, but when you need it, it's nice to have.

To the OP: sorry for the topic drift here
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Rebuilding 18 volt batteries for cordless tools.
« Reply #76 on: March 24, 2017, 10:55:12 am »
I haven't had a chance to really work it for a day, but I'm impressed so far. There are many reviews on YouTube. All have been positive. The big issue is the ten inch capacity. I wanted it mostly to cut dunnage and stickers at the mill where I have no power. Milwaukee days it will cut 400 2x4 of 150 2x12. I've been doing more small woodworking projects lately, meaning not timber framing, and this will make busting out a lot of parts go faster.

The more time I spend on YouTube, the more neat tools I'm finding that Milwaukee offers. Last night I found a combo spot/floodlight that I think I'll get, as well as a ton of other lighting options.

Wood-Mizer LT40HDD51-WR Wireless, Kubota L48, Honda Rincon 650, TJ208 G-S, and a 60"LogRite!