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Author Topic: Building my mill...  (Read 85923 times)

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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #620 on: March 17, 2017, 06:07:32 pm »
Kbeitz do you own any flat ground other than what you made that way .

Nothing except my lower valley. I'm the one that cleared that.
My father said the ground was good for nothing because it was
always wet. After the grass started growing it kinda dried up.
At first you could not drive on it but it gets better every year.

 

  
Collector and builder of many things.
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Offline gww

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #621 on: March 17, 2017, 06:19:41 pm »
I noticed that picture was not taken yesterday.
You made a pretty spot by clearing that.
gww

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #622 on: March 17, 2017, 06:24:31 pm »
I noticed that picture was not taken yesterday.
You made a pretty spot by clearing that.
gww

It's about 1/3 bigger than the picture but I don;t have a better shot.
This is the valley that I live in...

 

 


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Offline gww

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #623 on: March 17, 2017, 07:48:06 pm »
That shot sorta reminds me of a place in korea that I was stationed for a year when I was a youngster.
Cheers
gww

Offline Gundog

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #624 on: March 18, 2017, 10:33:03 am »
Looks like pretty country.

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #625 on: March 18, 2017, 01:39:08 pm »
I thought that this was one of my best shots of my home.

 

 
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Offline Ox

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #626 on: March 19, 2017, 10:37:01 am »
Agreed - very nice.  Ever have any problems with the buildings wanting to "walk out" at the bottom when built on a steep bank like that?  You know, when you see an old fence and all the post tops are leaned over toward the downhill side after decades of being there from the ground "creeping".  I grew up at a place with large steep banks too and the back side of the barn seems to have pulled out a bit heading for the downhill.  It's definitely trying to head for the bottom...
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #627 on: March 19, 2017, 11:31:45 am »
Years ago I had that problem with the barn. I dug a dead mans hole right
along the hard top. I glade the township did not see this. I don't thing that
would have like it one bit. I put a heavy galvanized pipe in the hole and
hooked a long cable to it. The cable runs under the floor all the way to the
back of the barn with large turnbuckles at the end. Every year I give the turnbuckles a few turn and I stopped dead the down hill slide. I might have
even brought it back up hill an inch or two.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  
Collector and builder of many things.
I have a
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Wood work shop
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And now a saw mill
and a bunch of new forum friends.

Offline Ox

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #628 on: March 19, 2017, 12:05:34 pm »
Good thinking!  That's a great idea!  We used a similar idea to squeeze together a partially collapsed roof on an old equipment barn that had somewhat pancaked off the tops of the walls.  Cable and turnbuckles just pulled it back together and with a little lifting with a loader it popped right back into place.  Left the cable there and it'll probably still be there 200 years from now.
Your buried pipe/anchor idea - just how strong do you think that is?  Do you think it would stay put if, say, you hooked it up to a 100 horse tractor like an International 966 and tried to pick it out of the ground using the 3 pt hitch?  Just trying to get an idea of the grip it has.  I realize it'll be stronger the more you pull on it from the side like pulling your barn back in place.  I bet pulling from the side you could easily pull a house over.
In case you can't tell, my mind is wheeling around with all the possible ideas.  That's the problem with me.  I don't usually come up with a simple idea like your pipe in the ground, but once I'm opened up to the idea I can think of all sorts of uses for it.  Just wish I was smart enough to think of things to begin with but I never was that smart...
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #629 on: March 19, 2017, 12:23:53 pm »
I don't know how strong it is and I cant say that it was my idea.
We did stuff like that when I was in the army. I took the idea
from what I learned when I was in.
I do know that's it's working and I'm just guessing that that pipe
just has to move some with all the pull that I got on it. I don't
think that I will have to worry about it for my lifetime. I have
another problem with the lower side of my shop that I need to
work on this spring. I think I loaded it to heavy and my poles
are sinking into the ground. So I got to jack it up and add more
post. You can in the first picture the dip in the roof line.
second picture you can see that I did not put many post under
it when I built it.

 

 

 

 
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Offline Ox

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #630 on: March 19, 2017, 12:32:17 pm »
My Lord, it sure is a lot of work to build in the mountains, isn't it?  Did you put strong flat rocks in the bottoms of your holes?  Or anything like that?  It was an undisturbed bank and not fill, right?  I don't know a whole lot about excavations processes but I know that little things like that make a big difference.  How will you jack it and add more post? 
Don't get me wrong - I'm not questioning anything you've done or are doing, I'm simply trying to learn more so's maybe I can offer a better suggestion.  I doubt it cause you're much smarter than me but I like having a bunch of different brains thinking on a problem because it's just better that way!
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #631 on: March 19, 2017, 02:18:28 pm »
The ground was what I would say was marsh type ground. I dug the holes
down as far as I could reach. No rocks or cement. I had no money at all
when I built on to my shop. Working at the time in Christmas trees I only
got paid once a year. So it's no wonder my poles sank and i also had
3000 small gas engines on shelves on the walls. All the lumber at that
time came from old houses that I took down for the wood. I still think
that it's holding up good for what I put into it. I also think it will out last
me. I dug the dirt out from under it years later just to gain more room
for all the junk I seem to acquire. That's in the very right side of this
picture. a lot of people get a good laugh at the garage doors on the
second floor. I had the door and no lumber so I used what I had.

 

 
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Offline Bruno of NH

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #632 on: March 19, 2017, 04:08:32 pm »
Overhead doors are nice in a shop .
Had 2 in my last shop when I lived I my home town.
Liked to open them up in nice wheather for the air movement and sun light .
Bruno
thomas 8013 mill ,Mahindra 3540 cab tractor loader  Dump trailer  and lot of contracting tools

Offline Ox

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #633 on: March 20, 2017, 11:21:22 am »
So ya made do with what ya had - wonderful!  I understand all of it.  I'm glad it's served you well thus far. 
I love that picture out across the pond.
I also love the garage doors and like Bruno said it would be great on a nice day.
Are you going to come up with something creative concerning your added post height?  Something that you can come along and increase the length as needed when she starts sagging the roof line again?  Something like the cellar adjustable posts that slide in and out for different heights then you pin it.
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #634 on: March 20, 2017, 05:38:30 pm »
It took about 20 years for it to droop. I think if I jack the droop back real
slow and add more post that it will out last me. Years ago I bought two
antique tractor trailer jacks that lift the trailer off the truck. I never again
seen any more like them . They have two spots to put the jack handle.
High and low speed. I jacked up the center of my BIG barn with just one
of them real easy. They are about 4 feet tall when closed up and will jack
out to about 6 feet. Kinda heavy to move around but they sure come in
handy.
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Offline Ox

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #635 on: March 21, 2017, 12:24:53 pm »
That sounds like the ticket, don't it?  I hope you share pics of that project as I'm sure there's others that are having sagging building problems. 
I've never seen the landing gear with a different place for the handle for different speeds.  I've only ever seen the handle moves in for low, out for high speed. 
After driving rig doing restaurant delivery I was yard jockey for a few years.  I've dropped and hooked more rigs/trailers than should be legal.  Most of the other yard jockeys have the yard mules that do all that without having to leave the truck.
 I had to do it the old fashioned way.  If I never touch another landing gear handle again it will be too soon!  :D
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #636 on: March 21, 2017, 01:53:45 pm »
What would landing gear jacks be rated for ? I'm sure a full size farm
barn was over doing it. I'm working on part of my large barn now. I
took a few shots of my old jacks. It's really dark so the pictures aren't
the best.

 

 

 

 
Collector and builder of many things.
I have a
machine shop
Wood work shop
And a Weld shop
And now a saw mill
and a bunch of new forum friends.

Offline Ox

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #637 on: March 21, 2017, 08:44:47 pm »
I believe the landing gears are rated for a minimum of 20 tons a pair.  More than likely they're rated for 40 ton as a pair.  I remember having a 5th wheel let loose once while making a hard over turn in the middle of a street in the city.  I guess the latch wasn't all the way hooked or something.  Which is weird cause I always did a tug test every time I backed under a trailer and before I cranked up the landing gear.  Anyway, the trailer come off the 5th wheel plate and sat on top of the tires.  I was stuck right there.  Had to crank up the loaded trailer, which was overweight, with nothing but the landing gear.  It was hard but it did it without feeling like it was going to break or anything like that.  I had that street blocked off for about a half hour cause I had to take breaks here and there cause it was so hard.  I believe that if you can crank your landing gear with nothing but the handle and can still move it by hand you won't break anything even in low gear.
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline Gearbox

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #638 on: March 21, 2017, 08:55:06 pm »
figure 36 on the tandem I would bet 40,000 and so at least 20,000 on left one
A bunch of chainsaws a BT6870 processer and not near enough time

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #639 on: March 21, 2017, 09:03:18 pm »
When I had to jack up the center of the large barn to replace
some rafters I never moved the handle to the low gear. That
was the heaviest thing that I ever had to jack. I think that it
would take forever in the lower gear. It takes long enough in
high. I wonder how old these jacks are. I got four of them.
Collector and builder of many things.
I have a
machine shop
Wood work shop
And a Weld shop
And now a saw mill
and a bunch of new forum friends.