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Author Topic: Building my mill...  (Read 86998 times)

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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2015, 11:31:35 am »
I got my Cooks bandsaw blade roller guides in today...
I would have tried to make these but the time is would take I thought I would just buy them. Also they are hardened. I have a heat treating oven but I would probably use enough electric hardening the rollers in dollars as the boughten one cost me.

 

 
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Offline Hilltop366

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2015, 11:40:38 am »
Nice!
Thanks for sharing.

Offline Ocklawahaboy

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2015, 01:37:56 pm »
I got my Cooks bandsaw blade roller guides in today...
I would have tried to make these but the time is would take I thought I would just buy them. Also they are hardened. I have a heat treating oven but I would probably use enough electric hardening the rollers in dollars as the boughten one cost me.
That is similar to the way some of us with mills still buy 2x4s. 

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #23 on: April 21, 2015, 01:45:06 am »
My toe adjustment....
 

 
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Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #24 on: April 21, 2015, 07:26:03 am »
"K"  copy the bearing numbers down and have some spares. After long use those guides will wear and need to be trued up, easiest is to have a tool post grinder on your metal lathe if not anneal and turn. I made a heavy duty tool post grinder for my lathe used a heavy grinder with a 6" wheel made a bracket to hold it on the tool post, just what the Dr. ordered for hardened pieces. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #25 on: April 21, 2015, 06:37:31 pm »
Today I made my outriggers...
Again everything came from the junkyard.
I found these pipe nipples and I think they was for hydraulics.
1/2" thick side wall.  My legs are 1-1/2" cold roll round.
I still need to come up with 6 feet or shoes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #26 on: April 22, 2015, 10:27:46 am »
Ya-Hoo... My blade is on....
One step closer to my first cut....
Lets see....
I need blade guards...
Blade guide...
Water bottle...
Log dogs...
And then I think I'm ready to go...


 

 
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #27 on: April 22, 2015, 10:31:01 am »
I see lots of people saying the the blades teeth is not to touch the wheel.
In my picture it looks lke the wheel is touching my teeth.
The crown is so high that the teeth dont look like it's touching.
Do you think this will be a problem ?
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Offline fishpharmer

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #28 on: April 22, 2015, 12:02:21 pm »
If your bandwheels have a high crown the set on the band teeth may not be affected.  Since you already have the band it will be worth a try.  The trailer tire type mills, like the one I built, are more prone to push the set out due to flex of the tire.  If you have everything lined up correctly and your bandwheel guides in the correct position, when you begin milling you will soon find out if the set is affected.  The blade will start to dive in the cut.  The reason that occurs is because the teeth set toward the bandwheels will be on the top side of the band when it enters the log, as those teeth are pushed inward by the bandwheel the lower teeth are cutting more, therefore the dive.

If that happens, you should be able to fix the problem by using a wider band, having the bandwheels turned so the crown is moved toward the leading edge, or by simply adding a rubber or urethane bandwheel "tire."  Grizzly may have the tires for those wheels.

Here is link to a sorely missed forestryforum legend Tom's (RIP) website with best explanation about bandsaw blades.




Keep up the good work!
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #29 on: April 22, 2015, 07:42:49 pm »
If your bandwheels have a high crown the set on the band teeth may not be affected.  Since you already have the band it will be worth a try.  The trailer tire type mills, like the one I built, are more prone to push the set out due to flex of the tire.  If you have everything lined up correctly and your bandwheel guides in the correct position, when you begin milling you will soon find out if the set is affected.  The blade will start to dive in the cut.  The reason that occurs is because the teeth set toward the bandwheels will be on the top side of the band when it enters the log, as those teeth are pushed inward by the bandwheel the lower teeth are cutting more, therefore the dive.

If that happens, you should be able to fix the problem by using a wider band, having the bandwheels turned so the crown is moved toward the leading edge, or by simply adding a rubber or urethane bandwheel "tire."  Grizzly may have the tires for those wheels.

Here is link to a sorely missed forestryforum legend Tom's (RIP) website with best explanation about bandsaw blades.




Keep up the good work!
The wheels already have the tires on them.
The saw they came off of only tale 1-1/4" blades. I'm useing 1-1/2"
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #30 on: April 22, 2015, 07:52:30 pm »
Not a lot done today..
To busy shopping at the junkyard...
I got my feet or shoes cut out and I started on the guides arms for the blade rollers.
I got these two racks (part of rack and pinion) to use for my log dog for adjustment.




 

 

 

 

 






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Offline fishpharmer

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #31 on: April 22, 2015, 08:14:35 pm »
There you go, the tires weren't apparent in other pics.   You could still go to a wider band if necessary, yet it looks as if the tooth set is unaffected. 
Built my own band mill with the help of Forestry Forum. 
Lucas 618 with 50" slabber
WoodmizerLT-40 Super Hydraulic
Deere 5065E mfwd w/553 loader

The reason a lot of people do not recognize opportunity is because it usually goes around wearing overalls looking like hard work. --Tom A. Edison

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #32 on: April 23, 2015, 08:34:41 am »
Blade guide....

 

 
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Offline fishpharmer

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #33 on: April 23, 2015, 09:46:54 am »
Your blade guide looks great.  Adjustability of the blade guides is very important.  Have you had a chance to adjust your blade guides by using a straight edge across the gullet of the bandblade and parallel to the log bed ?

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,64915.msg969163.html#msg969163
Built my own band mill with the help of Forestry Forum. 
Lucas 618 with 50" slabber
WoodmizerLT-40 Super Hydraulic
Deere 5065E mfwd w/553 loader

The reason a lot of people do not recognize opportunity is because it usually goes around wearing overalls looking like hard work. --Tom A. Edison

Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #34 on: April 23, 2015, 08:19:25 pm »
Your blade guide looks great.  Adjustability of the blade guides is very important.  Have you had a chance to adjust your blade guides by using a straight edge across the gullet of the bandblade and parallel to the log bed ?

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,64915.msg969163.html#msg969163

From what I have been reading thats not important. Some even say to have the beginning cut of the blade lead into the cut... ??? So what am I missing ??? Help me out...

Or are you saying lay a  straight edge across the blade like I have the black line drawed on the image  and run a tape down to the bed to check for  parallel ?



 
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Offline Ga Mtn Man

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2015, 08:36:17 pm »
From what I have been reading thats not important. Some even say to have the beginning cut of the blade lead into the cut... ??? So what am I missing ??? Help me out...
You didn't read that on this forum.  It is very important that your blade be parallel to the saw bed.
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #36 on: April 23, 2015, 08:43:53 pm »
From what I have been reading thats not important. Some even say to have the beginning cut of the blade lead into the cut... ??? So what am I missing ??? Help me out...
You didn't read that on this forum.  It is very important that your blade be parallel to the saw bed.

maybe I missunderstood what i was reading...
But if the bandsaw wheels is squared off the bed would not that make the blade square with the bed.
I have not checked the blade to the bed. I was thinking it would have to be square if the wheels was...
I will do that first thing in the morn..
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Online gww

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #37 on: April 23, 2015, 09:16:42 pm »
k
I would say your other thought is easy to come by, that squaring the head was an important item.  I have seen post where no blade guide is used.  I have seen the blade guides that are just close but do not touch the blade.  I could see where it becomes more important that when using a blade guide that pushes down on the blade that even if the other was correct the blade guide could change it.  I know you have seen my build and the problims I have cause you posted on it.  You therefore know I am no expert but just someone who is working through our issues.

Your blade guides and their supports look much more solid then mine and I think that will be helpfull.
Good luck
gww

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #38 on: April 23, 2015, 09:49:02 pm »
I have no idea how much sawing that you will do, but blade guides wear.  The end toward the blade teeth gets the most wear.  As they wear, they must be adjusted as in tilted downward to keep the blade horizontal with the sawmill bed.  Normal setup also adjusts that end horizontally so that the back flange will pull the blade upward and toward the blade guide if/when the blade is forced back against that flange.
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: Building my mill...
« Reply #39 on: April 24, 2015, 03:14:22 am »
I have no idea how much sawing that you will do, but blade guides wear.  The end toward the blade teeth gets the most wear.  As they wear, they must be adjusted as in tilted downward to keep the blade horizontal with the sawmill bed.  Normal setup also adjusts that end horizontally so that the back flange will pull the blade upward and toward the blade guide if/when the blade is forced back against that flange.

Hummm... I have made no adjustment for tilt.... Only up-down and in and out...
I guess I could egg shape my bearing support bolt hole in the back and put two set screws adjust tilt...
Any other ideas ?

Thanks.
Kevin
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I have a
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