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Author Topic: Recommendations on a draw knife?  (Read 6493 times)

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Online Jeff

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Recommendations on a draw knife?
« on: March 09, 2014, 10:34:50 pm »
I've got a couple hundred Northern White Cedar logs to skin back this spring. Anybody have any recommendations on the size and style of the proper draw knife to use, and a good place to locate one?
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Offline Mooseherder

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2014, 10:38:12 pm »
I bought a couple of them off eBay a few years ago for around 20 dollars each.
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Offline giant splinter

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2014, 11:53:50 pm »
Jeff,
My favorite is a Barr specialty tools Draw knife 12 " cutting edge, I have an old Stanley that is easier for bark removal with an 8" blade it is fairly easy to use. I don't do much of it so Im no expert and I bet the log cabin guys are the ones that would know the best brand and models for what you need. Here is a link with a lot of different styles.http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/Draw-Knife-Selection/products/104/
roll with it

Offline isawlogs

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2014, 12:03:56 am »
A sharp one....  ;)   Jeff I would only saye to try to get one that is at least 16'' wide between the handles with a blade face of 1½'' to 2'' wide, it rides the wood a lot beter and is easier to get under the bark with out bitting to hard.  :P
  If by an enormous chance the bar seams to be lose, you  can use an old leaf spring with a pipe welded for a handle. The business end needs to be grinded round and sharpened some only to be able to get it under the bark.

  I have a Log Wizzard that I normally use to debark logs with, all except for cedar, the stringy bark will jam that thing up so quick, its just frustating to use.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2014, 05:28:28 am »
How about a spud, can make one from an old truck spring? Any old abandoned trucks in that old 'bone yard' up there? :)

I have not peeled cedar, but the bark is quite thin and difficult to remove as Marcel has hinted to. But one thing, if you get a hold of a loose piece it will peal up the log a long ways because it's fibrous like hemp for ropes. If they lay a couple years the bark will fall right off, but then you have bug trails.  :-\

http://www.leevalley.com item# 65U05.10  bark spud  , item # 09A01.30 log builder's slick  ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

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Offline Seaman

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2014, 06:35:58 am »
I have had someone tell me they used a pressure washer with great results, state of the log has a lot to do with how w ell that works I bet.
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Offline Brian_Weekley

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2014, 07:29:11 am »
Peavey sells 16 inch drawknifes and bark spuds that are still made in the USA.

http://store.peaveymfg.com/cart/category/1981/Logging_Tools/1/
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Offline dukndog

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2014, 07:51:50 am »
Jim Rogers has a few on the For Sale page here on the forum. All the tools I've purchased from Jim and Tom have been in great shape and very sharp!!

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Offline WDH

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2014, 08:30:04 am »
John Neeman makes them, too. 
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2014, 09:15:22 am »
I am just wondering here.That cedar was just cut,I wonder in May and June if the cedar will even know that. Meaning will it start to try to grow and the bark will be able to peel right off. I have peel some cedar for posts for my Father and my projects. Seem like in had some hemlock that I cut in the fall and than in the spring I could peel some of the slabs and some of the big pieces I had to split into firewood.
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Offline Left Coast Chris

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2014, 09:36:25 am »
How long have the logs been down?

We just removed bark from some western red cedar.  Had one that was dead for 6 mos and one for 3 mos.  On the 6 mos tree, the bark had slipped and it came of in big pieces easily with pry bars.  The 3 mos tree was MUCH more work and left the bottom of the bark on the tree. Had to use axes and chain saw.

Suggest letting them slip before trying to peel.  If they slip a draw knife would not be used.  Still handy to have one around in case it is needed.
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Offline LittleJohn

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2014, 09:46:15 am »
If the logs are green,bark will easily come off with a SPUD, and it will come off in long strands
If logs are some dry, break out the drawn shave a sturdy vise/back
  Last drawn shave I got was from Rockler (several years ago ~probably $50 or so - I now feel I overpaid), but I was in a hurry as I just broke my hand-me-down draw shave that was more weld repair then draw shave.  I want to say the blade on the new draw was 9" or 10"; nice for working on the smaller (up to 7") cedar logs I used for swings.  Not sure what size you plan on working with but, also invest is a good sharpening stone and a pair of sturdy gloves - the sawdust from the cedar bark is wicked (might want to consider dusk mask if logs are realy dry)

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2014, 10:29:27 am »
I would personally buy a used one. I have some pics of used ones at the hardware store from this morning. I'll have to email them to myself later so I can download them to the desktop, then upload them to the forum. ::) The used ones here are $40 or $50 for the smaller ones, up to $140 for some really nice, really big ones, all very nice quality. I have never peeled cedar, so I don't know what to suggest to you. I peeled a lot of white pine and white oak with a long handled "spud" from the hardware store. I'll see if I have a pic later. Either way, it's going to be tough on the shoulders if it is stuck tight to the log. :-\
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Offline Reddog

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2014, 10:59:41 am »

Online Jeff

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2014, 01:00:35 pm »
Corley5 and I were talking this morning, and he was way ahead of me. I was going to get the bark off this spring, then crib the logs out of view for drying.  I think Greg had the better idea. Since each log is getting two flat sides with the sawmill, I should just two side them this spring. It gives me flats to stack in a crib, they will dry without having to remove all the bark right now, and when I do remove the bark, part of it will already be gone. I do have an old slick here, I wonder how it would work?
 

 
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2014, 02:58:55 pm »
I'd sure hate to remove that nice patina off it. ;D ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2014, 06:17:12 pm »
Jeff how long are these logs?  Reason I ask a 8 foot log is much easier to peel than a 16 foot one. A spud has a slight curve to it and kinda shape on the edge. The shape part allows you to get it under the bark and work it off. I find out having another shape tool comes in handy too. Even if it's a big srew driver. Just helps to keep the bark up for the spud to go into. I think one of my brothers "borrowed" the spud we had. With me when I peel cedar I take the saw down the lenght of the log. BUT I am sawing for lumber,not an live edge or whatever you call it. The saw mark helps me get under the bark. Works on hemlock too.
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Offline jander3

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2014, 06:43:50 pm »
Gotta go with Barr.  I have many draw knives.  Antiques, store bought, homemade, etc.   About 10 years ago i invested about a hundred and half into a Barr draw knife.   The heavy-duty, bevel down design.  Crap, it cut my log peeling time in 1/2.   
 

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2014, 07:26:31 am »
I have used a machete in the past for peeling cedar. Use it pretty much like a draw knife.
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Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Recommendations on a draw knife?
« Reply #19 on: March 11, 2014, 12:15:27 pm »
Sounds like a ton of work, Jeff. That will whip you into shape for sure. ;D

Here is the best I have found. Solid forged steel with bolt through handles. I'm sorry to say that I don't know the manufacturer, but the twisted steel at the handle base is distinctive. They come in a variety of sizes from maybe something like an 8" blade up to this one, the real manly man edition with a 13" blade. I've peeled or had peeled logs up to about 20" with it, solid as a rock. I've even had the tool busters use it and it survived unshathed except for a few handle scratches. If you can find one, I recommend it highly.

 

I think I paid maybe 30-40 bucks for mine about 15 years ago.

The guys who do this for a living make really nice setups where they can sit or stand while peeling, with the logs solidly supported on cross beams set onto posts. Best of luck with your project. ;D
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