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Author Topic: in time the woods wears a man down.  (Read 4257 times)

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Offline Ryan D

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #40 on: February 13, 2014, 08:59:16 pm »
I would bet that any logger in his 50s can do more than just about anyone else in any other trade. While some here seem to show signs of wear and tear I look around at the over weight out of shape of other men my age and give logging the credit for keeping me in good shape. I don't know any logger who had to order some late night exercise  tapes to get into shape. I bet no one here belongs to a gym, or runs on weekends. I would be surprised to find any of you that suffer sleepless nights. So your knees hurt, your back is sore and your tired, Suck it butter cup your loggers not accountants and paper pushers.  Who after all gets to share a great story and a scar to go with it. I remember the story line in Jaws when the two guys are comparing scars with each other and how they got them, that's what real men do; I don't think and office workers do that. We do cool stuff, run lots of cool equipment and do things that most can not. If all we are is tired and sore then we are still ahead of the rest of the world, at least in my demented little mind

I do powerlifting in the winter and play rugby all summer on top of logging. It's pretty tough to get out of bed most days but in a sadistic kind of way I enjoy the pain. You're right about the sleep though. Usually takes me all of 30 seconds to be lights out when my head hits the pillow.

Offline M_S_S

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #41 on: February 13, 2014, 09:23:33 pm »
Autocar I know what you are talking about lol. I am 68, be 69 this summer. I am a real cowboy and a firewood cutter. In the spring and summer I take care of about 800 mother cows and their calves, I am horseback every day. When the cattle are shipped in the fall I cut firewood. I am in partners with a young fellow(34). He works a full time job and only cuts on his time off. Lol I am there everyday, but when he is there he does 75% of the work, he takes care of the old man. Getting old is not for imps lol. ED
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Offline dustyjay

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #42 on: February 13, 2014, 09:39:28 pm »
I am only 30 and think about how my body will be in another 20 or so years.  I love what I do, I try to be smart about the moves I make, when to make them, etc.   I have no ambition to get any bigger then a one man show with a cable machine, maybe diversify, sell firewood or something.  I hope doing a good job, taking pride in what  I do keeps me busy.  Some days are frustrating with breakdowns and just general bad days, everyone has them.  At the end of the day  I love what I do and I wouldnt change it, especially with mechanized equipment!


I've spent days working with a farmi winch, days working with cable skidder operators, and days working cutting and skidding with my horses. At the end of the horse days I'm feeling much healthier and not just dead form the pace. Volume's another topic- I can't move nearly as much, but the pacing is different, and healthier I think. All the big volume jobs around here go to "machine operators," as  240b said, anyway.
Proper prior planning prevents pith poor performance

Offline plasticweld

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #43 on: February 14, 2014, 07:14:39 am »
Quote from:Ryan D on February 12, 2014, 05:35:51 pm
I do powerlifting in the winter and play rugby all summer on top of logging. It's pretty tough to get out of bed most days but in a sadistic kind of way I enjoy the pain. You're right about the sleep though. Usually takes me all of 30 seconds to be lights out when my head hits the pillow.
[/quote]

I also spend my off time in a quiet safe environment with no challenges

My son and I at Summit Point race track

 

Offline Black_Bear

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #44 on: February 17, 2014, 07:52:03 am »
living the good life sometimes I wish My dad and I could go fully mechanical. But its not in our budget and it aint our style. I havent seen a delimber that could delimb a hard wood tree successfully.

If you ever get to northern New England I can show you one or two successful hardwood delimbers; Cat or JD carriers, with the Propac forestry package being a popular stroke delimbing head up here. 300-400 cord per week of hardwood, mostly beech/birch/maple, delimbed within mill specs - well, most of it anyway.

Ed

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #45 on: February 17, 2014, 08:57:53 am »
That works in northern New England because of piece size. You drive up to a 40 inch rock maple or yellow birch with limbs as big as most trees that machine is limbing and the maple/birch will win. I was just thinning beside a harvest block that was on going this past fall, and those big old bruisers were left to stand. And it wasn't because they was thinking of the owls. Those big ones look smaller out by the road looking in, then they do when your standing beside them. :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline Black_Bear

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #46 on: February 17, 2014, 02:13:25 pm »
That works in northern New England because of piece size. You drive up to a 40 inch rock maple or yellow birch with limbs as big as most trees that machine is limbing and the maple/birch will win. I was just thinning beside a harvest block that was on going this past fall, and those big old bruisers were left to stand. And it wasn't because they was thinking of the owls. Those big ones look smaller out by the road looking in, then they do when your standing beside them. :D

Certification standards require us to leave wildlife trees throughout a final harvest. Most of the oversized trees, such as the maple and birch you're writing about, are left standing. The yellow birch with the expanded crowns are the worst, but the operator can take his time and keep rolling the tree to get it clean. The majority of the stems require 1 or 2 stroke lengths and a topping - it goes pretty quick and the trees are clean.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #47 on: February 17, 2014, 03:49:58 pm »
I'll tell ya exactly what I've experienced about wildlife trees because I've been involved in way more strict environmental practices than most with BC's Forest Practices codes in the 1990's. When wildlife tree were left they were the poorest growth of woods left in patches where all the best timber was removed around them, so you had islands of crap timber left in a clear cut. That was your wildlife trees. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline stoneeaglefarm

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Re: in time the woods wears a man down.
« Reply #48 on: February 21, 2014, 11:02:02 am »
If ya hand chop and pull cable like us old bucks, I am 55, and you can get more than 6 hard hours in during a winter like this than you should be on the cover of a magazine. Three things keep us old farts going, Luck, more luck and we just love what we do. Take some glucosomine, drink alot of water during the day and do not slow down to much. If your uncle is over 50 and still hand chopping decent amounts of wood all the power to him.