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Author Topic: OMG  (Read 4896 times)

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Offline Den Socling

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Re: OMG
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2012, 08:45:34 pm »
I have to go there and see these trees! We are doing a job in Washington. I will make the trip down. I am amazed by big trees in PA. Those Redwoods make them look like weeds.

Offline Slab Slicer

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Re: OMG
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2012, 08:51:10 pm »
Check some of the climbing links here. These folks really love there recreational climbing.

http://www.sherrilltree.com/Rec-Galleries/Photos_2
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Offline Slab Slicer

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Re: OMG
« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2012, 08:54:06 pm »
2016 LT35HDG25, Kubota BX1500 w/FEL and custom skidding rig, Stihl MS362-25", Stihl MS250-20", Stihl MS192-18", Stihl MS180c-18". 2011 Toyota Tacoma, Ringo 12' trailer w/ folding rear gate, Iron & Oak 22 ton splitter.

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Offline thenorthman

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Re: OMG
« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2012, 11:04:49 pm »
I have to go there and see these trees! We are doing a job in Washington. I will make the trip down. I am amazed by big trees in PA. Those Redwoods make them look like weeds.

If'n yer allready in Warshington then its a hop and a skip to the Hoh Rain Forest, just a few miles south of forks, trees are not as big  but still very impressive, also some very large ceder just out side Darrington on the beaver lake trail. 

I keep asking the wifey if we can take a self loader and the 090 and go camping in the hoh rain forest, she always says no but it would be funny to see the tree huggers panic just a little bit...

They don't make a 6 foot bar for nothin ya know
well that didn't work

Offline redprospector

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Re: OMG
« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2012, 11:42:18 pm »
I HOPE they are just climbing for the climb.  Because the idea of cutting one of those ancients just makes me sick.  That would be like destroying the Great Salt Plains, Grand Canyon, Hoover Dam, Taj Mahal, or the Great Wall of china.  Trees that size are a part of the History of our World.
They have seen things we can only Dream about.  Has anyone ever found the Oldest living tree?  That has to be a sight to see!  I've seen thousand year old rocks but to witness the splender of a 300 year old living thing is a wonder!

I don't think you have to worry about seeing one of those trees cut. The environmentalist have such a strangle hold on this country that we can't cut anything over 24" DBH in the Lincoln National Forest.

It's not that I don't agree with you that those giants shouldn't be cut. I just get a little huffy when people get all touchy/feely about a tree. Once we let it get started, it only had one way to go.

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Offline clww

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Re: OMG
« Reply #25 on: December 03, 2012, 11:47:38 pm »
There's a great book that you can get with many pictures and stories of the removal of some giant trees. The book is "High Climbers and Timber Fallers" by Gerald Beranek. It is in the Bailey's catalog right now on sale for $39.99.
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Offline Ironwood

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Re: OMG
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2012, 12:39:48 am »
Den,

 YES YES YES, go see them and CAMP among them! I have the books and several posters as the others do. Stihl had a promo poster with several "tiers" of guys staged with all the models of their BIG saws on the spring boards.  We stayed in the Humbolt NF and it was so cool. my oldest was 2 1/2 (2004). Wifey had a conference in San Fran and we road tripped a week and a half Central Valley,  Redding, Redwood Creek, Sciotia Lumber Museum (must see,  woops update: looks like it closed), Humbolt, Cresent City, Kalamath Falls, Shasta, St. Helens, Army Buddy near Rainier and then Pike Street Market and SeaTac Airport home. Take a fly rod if your into that.  ;) Totally awesome. Such wonderful presence when you among the Coastals........ Nice camping too. I really liked Grants Pass (I could move there). Really go to Sciotia and see the Palco Lumber Museum. There is an incredible story of the "Flood of 64'  " I saw a sign in Humbolt that said "Water  level 64'" and I thought it was a joke (like our "Air mail signs") but sure enough there were pics in the museum, water washed out every bridge in 5 counties. The sign I saw pointed up to another sign 30-40' UP :o. Holy Arks! That torrent washed ALOT of bigguns out onto the flood plain toward Eureka (home to Carson's famous redwood house)


http://www.eurekaheritage.org/the_carson_mansion.htm

 and even today the the former "Redwood burl guys" that used to "cleanup" after active logging in the forest (no longer an option) go out onto the shoals of the Eel River and use excavators to dig up the washout. Here is a VERY dark root crown burl stained from being buried in the shoal. I bought two 12'ers while out there then made some commissioned stuff from them when they got to Pa.

 Ironwood (now saving even the smallest scraps of Redwood I find, even stuff from the tacky old lawn furniture I find "curbside" ::))
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Offline terry f

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Re: OMG
« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2012, 04:01:35 am »
    Redprospector, walk around some of those trees, and you can't help but get a little touchy/feely. Not being a religious person, its hard not to get a little spiritual when you are around them. Hard to comprehend the time these trees have been liveing.

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: OMG
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2012, 04:41:09 am »
Den

Have you made it over to see the box huckleberry down in Perry county?  13,000 years old and it covers acres.  Its not as impressive as the redwoods, because its only 6" high.

Detweiler Run Natural area has a virgin hemlock forest.  They took us to that during ecology classes back in 1970.  Impressive trees, as well.  Its back around Bear Meadows in the Rothrock park.
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Offline ohsoloco

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Re: OMG
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2012, 07:54:24 am »
Ron, do you recall where those hemlocks are?  That's just a few miles from my place.  I've been to Alan Seeger Natural Area around Bear Meadows.  Some big hemlocks there, but the biggest ones came down in the past ten years or so. 

The Sequoias on the west coast was a runner up for out honeymoon, I still want to make it out there.

Offline Cypressstump

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Re: OMG
« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2012, 08:10:13 am »
That is one fine tree for sure. I did see the tv feature of where the guys were trying to locate the tallest redwood, climb one, then see another in the distance that looked taller, so off they'd go. Amazing.
Down here the oldest known virgin cyress tree was taken in the 1930's, it's ring count was 1386 years old, and it was said to be solid at the base, said to be the largest completely solid cyprees known.  A mere toothpick compared to those giant redwoods.
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Offline Den Socling

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Re: OMG
« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2012, 12:04:46 pm »
Ron,

I lived in State College from '72 to '82 so I've been in the Bear Meadows area. I didn't know about Box Huckleberry so I Googled. Very interesting shrub! I read that one plant can cover 8 acres.

Offline WmFritz

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Re: OMG
« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2012, 01:49:45 pm »
The title of the book I read was ''The Wild Trees.'' It was mainly about a botanist  from PA named Dr. Stephen Sillett who, along with a few other climbers, discovered some of the worlds tallest trees. The tallest, they named Hyperion, measured 379.1 ft. :o
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Offline Cypressstump

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Re: OMG
« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2012, 02:01:00 pm »
humm,,, how do ya string a climbing rope up to the first limb on a tree whose lower limb may be well over a 100 foot above head ?
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Offline ohsoloco

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Re: OMG
« Reply #34 on: December 04, 2012, 02:19:25 pm »
They make a slingshot for that.  I have a short DVD about the Big Shot slingshot that Sherrill made, and it includes a clip about climbing some of the big Sitka Spruce.  Cool little video  :)

Offline DRB

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Re: OMG
« Reply #35 on: December 06, 2012, 01:27:19 pm »
We always think of the Redwoods when big trees are talked about but the tree in WA were very impressive.  Here is an account of a 465 foot tall Doug fir.  Thats a lot taller then the redwoods.

"From one of those valleys came the most startling account: Newspaper reports of a 465-foot fir, logged in 1897 at Loop's Ranch, an early homestead in the lower North Fork Nooksack River valley, between Mount Baker and present-day Bellingham.

The Nooksack Giant, as we'll call it here, was unceremoniously felled with crosscut saws, then cut into massive sections and yarded a short distance across the valley floor to rail cars, which hauled the logs west to New Whatcom, now Bellingham.

There, one cross-section was displayed on the corner of Railroad Avenue and Holly Street, bearing a sign noting the tale of the tape: 465 feet in height, with 220 feet of clear stalk between the ground and the first branch.

The tree was nearly 11 feet in diameter, 34 feet in circumference, and provided more than 96,000 board feet of lumber enough to construct eight large, two-story houses. A count of its rings indicated an age of at least 480 years young, by giant tree standards, and obviously still growing.

If those measurements are accurate, the Nooksack Giant likely was one of the tallest trees, of any kind, ever found. It would have been 50 feet taller than a contemporaneous well-documented giant fir, logged in the Lynn Valley, north of Vancouver, B.C., in 1902."

The whole story can be found here.

http://seattletimes.com/html/restlessnative/2016112972_restless05m.html

Offline Ianab

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Re: OMG
« Reply #36 on: December 06, 2012, 02:01:34 pm »
Also worth looking at Eucalyptus regnans in Australia.

Although the tallest surviving ones are only around 300ft, there are reliable historical measurements of 370ft, and some claims of over 400ft.

It's the the tallest flowering plant, all the other big trees are Softwoods.

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Offline Slab Slicer

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Re: OMG
« Reply #37 on: December 06, 2012, 06:38:06 pm »
They make a slingshot for that.  I have a short DVD about the Big Shot slingshot that Sherrill made, and it includes a clip about climbing some of the big Sitka Spruce.  Cool little video  :)

We use the "Big Shot" for rigging climbing lines into trees we are either removing, or trimming. I don't do the climbing, just the rigging. Sherrill is the best place for arborist gear that I've found. A 100 foot shot with one of them would be easy. It's a sling shot on steroids.  :D
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Offline ashes

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Re: OMG
« Reply #38 on: December 06, 2012, 11:49:16 pm »
Now you guys are talking about my neck of the woods.

The picture Den linked is of Dr. Stephen Sillett's wife, and another ecologist. I assume that it was taken by Sillett from an adjacent tree. He is a professor at Humboldt State University teaching a class called silvics (tree physiology). I will be in that class next semester. In the labs for that class we will be able to climb a couple of times on redwoods that are on campus along with some blue gums.

Sillett works on research with another guy Dr. Robert Van Pelt, who also teaches at HSU. Van Pelt and Sillett go down to Australia to do research on blue gum trees, and the two of them are obsessed by the tallest trees in the world. I have seen a crossbow that had a fishing pole reel modified onto it for shooting a line into the canopy.

All very cool stuff. And yes that picture is as real as it gets. Those trees are huge, and don't fret, old growth redwood logging is a thing of the past. :)

Offline horselogger50

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Re: OMG
« Reply #39 on: December 07, 2012, 05:06:42 am »
That picture is incredible