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Author Topic: Debarking wood for log furniture  (Read 14736 times)

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Offline Ax- man

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Debarking wood for log furniture
« on: July 08, 2012, 09:48:26 pm »
Hello again,

I posted in this forum awhile back about making rustic log furniture from tree parts. I am still at it and have sold a few pieces at a local antique dealer's store for a good price but need to find a way to get faster at assembling these benches and stools I have been making to increase the money i make on my end after the store takes their sales commision.. My biggest stumbling block is making tenon's and debarking some spiecies of wood.

I did a search here and the Logman tenon maker from Bailey's got good reviews so I am going to get the kit to attach to my new fancy router I bought a few months ago. Hopefully this will speed up my tenon making instead of doing it with hand tools. If anyone has some input on this I would appreciate any comments.

The other stumbling block is debarking wood especially small logs that become legs for benches and stools. I have added to my collection of drawknives but still looking for a faster way if there is one. A drawknive on slab wood for the seat of a bench is no problem but debarking small logs with a sharp drawknive  seems to take longer than it should.  I have tried wire wheels and sanding disks on a angle grinder with mixed results depending on wood species. If anyone has some other ideas I would like to hear them.

I know that green wood is the easiest to debark but time is not on my side at this time of the year. Most of my wood has been sitting around for awhile in the hopes that mother nature will do the job for me but sometimes it just doesn't work out that way.


Offline WDH

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2012, 10:02:01 pm »
De-bark your wood in the spring when the cambium becomes active and the buds start to break.  Then, you can store the wood for later use.  If you get the timing right, the bark will just peel off.
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Offline dboyt

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2012, 08:10:25 am »
Dyna products (http://www.dyna-products.com/) has a line of log furniture manufacturing equipment, including a debarker that gives a rustic look to the logs. Problem is, they're not cheap.
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Offline Piston

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2012, 11:53:59 am »
Is the bark too tight or young to use a bark spud on?  It seem it a bark spud would work great on larger logs with thick bark but not sure if your using mostly smaller diameter logs, which I assume is the case. 
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Offline shelbycharger400

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2012, 08:17:56 pm »


http://www.abforest.com/p/Log-Peeler-3966
i want one

bosworth tools has them for $400,  ouch

Offline 1938farmall

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2012, 09:55:01 pm »
ax-man,  your op asked about cutting tenons.  check out the companion vid in the link posted by shelby that shows the router-based tenon maker.   the threaded rod that centers the tenon is the secret - it controls the advance speed as you cut the tenon & is adjustable for diameter.   i made one that works like a champ.  al
aka oldnorskie

Offline shenandoahsawmill

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2012, 12:23:47 pm »
I have been testing a 20 lb demolition hammer with a sharpened clay spade. Works great for larger logs. You might give this a try on a smaller scale with a small hammer drill set on the hammer (not drill) setting and a chisel that has the end shaped like a bark spud. An air tool (cheap and light) might be the way to go.  Gary

Offline lynnds

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2012, 11:29:47 am »
Ax-man, the chosen method of debarking of logs can depend upon several things; type/species of log, size, age of log and condition of bark, and perhaps most importantly the visual results you desire.  Some equipment is great for fast debarking, yet the speed is traded for end results.  For example, large angle grinders and/or chainsaw attachments (I have both and rarely use them) are quicker than some other methods.  The optional "trade" is that, if you desire to have the beetle or worm trails on the log, or various patterns and colors near the surface of the log, it is better to remove the bark carefully, and yes, slower, with simple tools such as a shovel, draw knife, small hand-held angle grinder with a coarse grit disc, or hand-held belt sander.  Again, this depends upon how loose the bark is on the log, and the species of log.  There is no "right" or "wrong" method.  Different methods provide different results.  The choice is yours.  If you want the results to be "white and plain", then use tools which will go deep with quickness.  I prefer to retain the natural beauty just below the bark, and this does require careful, light pressure work with the tools, which for me is usually a draw knife.
Happy crafting to you!

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2012, 12:04:34 pm »
They could not have chosen a thinner barked species then aspen to demonstrate that peeler on in that video. I have to wonder what it would do with white pine or cedar. Whitepine has a thick heavy bark, Cedar bark is pretty abrasive. I think the sharp life of a tool likethat would be minimal on cedar, or anything other than the Aspen shown.
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Offline shelbycharger400

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2012, 05:00:23 pm »
thats what i thought jeff,
looking at the pictures,  they are replaceable cutters. they look like Heavy planer blades in it.  not those cheapy planer blades either. Looking further into it, i seen dewalts dw680 the  NEW 3 1/2 in planer with Thick blades that are almost an inch wide, and slotted for bolts., Hmm i have access to lathes and mills and i just might have to make one this spring up at the college.  nothin more than makin a bench plane, only in  all metal tho.    I have debarked an oak log or 2, and its easier than ash, and ive done them both with a sledge hammer and a 3 in wide mason chisel
The bark isnt that tough as the wood underlying , but wet oak to me seems rather soft.

Offline Ax- man

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2012, 08:09:38 pm »
Sorry for not keepingup with the thread, had some technical problems with the computer and the site. I had a reply typed out awhile back but it wouldn't post  :'( :'(

Made some changes since I started this thread that have really made a difference in how fast I can put this make the pieces and joints for the log furniture. Finding time to do it is still a problem but I don't make a living at this so it has to take a backseat to the things I do for a living.

Let's talk about the debarking. You guy's really posted some heavy duty tools and methods for doing this chore . I didn't know that such stuff existed. Unfortunely , I am not into the log home building biz so this is way out of my league for what I do. Most of what I do is small diameter logs and limbs so the drawknife is still the tool of choice although that air chisel idea is something I am going to give a try. I am like lynnds and like to expose as much of the natural beauty of the wood if possible.I am not that keen of insect damage though

What I did to help me with this debarking was make a 16" cant out of a pine log that stands about waist high. Then I took a scrap 2"x 10"x 3 feet long  and lag bolted it to the  cant . I then take my little portable vise which is bolted to a smaller board and then clamp it to the cant board. I can now take a small log or limb wood any where from 3 to 7 foot long , clamp it in the vise and work just about the whole length of the piece with a draw knife. Much better and easier that using the sawbuck and binding strap method. I can get more torque on the drawknife and work more surface area of the  of the log before I have to unclamp it. One thing alway's leads to another. Now I have plans for a bigger vise similar to a plumbers clamp for working on pipe so I can do slightly bigger diameter logs.Pieces of wood that gave me trouble before are not going to be a problem now which prompted me to start this thread to see what other guys mihgt be doing different.

Now the tennon making. My tenon maker from Bailey's came in shortly after starting this thread. I like it and have made much better tenon's than I can with the hand tools and do them much faster. Getting the thing set-up wasn't what I would call a user freindly experience for me . MY new HD Sears router base didn't adapt to the metal frame which meant drilling holes which I am not an expert. I finally got it mounted and centered after much screwing around. I should have just got my Dremel out and made slots to screw it down to the mounting base. I didn't want this to be a permanantly mounted to my work bench due to space and the mess. I wanted it portable like my little vise I mentioned earlier so I could move it and clamp it down to a couple of saw horses or work outside if need be. My first attempt at bolting to my clamp board resulted in the plastic blocks being to tight to put in the metal frame . Finally after more alterations I got that part working good. Finally after all this screwing around I was ready to make a machine cut tenon. I was quite happy with the first one although there is a learning curve to doing this and like all things takes practice.

I can see now that I have used this tenon maker that it is kind of a beginner tool. Farmall made a post about the upscale version of the Logman tenon make . Now that I have tried mine I can see more clearly what he meant about that self centering screw. If I stay at this and can make a little more side money I can there will be a time for an upgrade.

Thanks for all the replies and input. It has helped me out . Hopefully this thread will stay alive for a little longer.

Anyone got any input on the  Log Wizard attachment for a chainsaw. I have asked a guy here locally that is into this log furniture stuff but on a more serious level than I am. He didn't think it was all that great and he has tried one. A chainsaw dealer here sold them a long time ago. He sold one new and it was long before it was for sale again only used and abused. I guess it didn't work out to good for the guy who bought. I thought one might work to reduce the diameter of a small log to expose the heartwood like in a Walnut. I am not serious about one but wondered if it might work.


Offline shelbycharger400

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2012, 09:20:02 pm »
the timber frame builder i know has one, last i seen it had a lot of dust on it,  his chain mortiser is nice but he deals with square logs.
not sure if id want a 3 bladed planer head on the end of a chain saw,  its jumpy

Offline JoeB

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2012, 04:04:44 pm »
Howdy, might sound stupid but try a pressure washer, depending on the type, i have three, one 7-800 psi, another 1900 psi, and another that with the "turbo tip" will take paint off of a cinder block. Just an idea. Cheers!

Offline Dave S

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2012, 01:01:23 pm »
A pressure washer works just fine. I work with white cedar most of the time, give it a couple of months after cutting to shink a little, you really need the turbo nozzle so you dont fuzz the wood. A min. of 2700 lbs is needed - you would get away with less but it would take more time and might leave the slick stuff (don't know how to spell candium) on the wood. If you get up around 3500 lbs pressure you can really clean any of the pines or just about anything else. When the log drys its all done, ready for finish. Make sure you use a turbo nozzel or you'll spend more time sanding the fuzz of than your spending peeling by hand. A cheap way to make tennons is use a hole saw, drill the end of the piece with it and draw knife the wood off the outside of the cut you just made, your tennion will be about a quarter inch smaller that the size marked on the hole saw. Use quality deep hole saws (millwalke), three or four saws and an arbor and your good to go, less than $50-$60.
Dave

Offline bandit403

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2012, 11:48:20 am »
I have just started to make furniture so I don't know alot. I bought a Tenonator, and it seems to work well. I liked the idea of one head to cut different size tenons so that is why I went with this one.

http://www.logwoofer.com/tenonator.php

Offline Cedar Savage

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2012, 06:48:14 pm »
I have just started to make furniture so I don't know alot. I bought a Tenonator, and it seems to work well. I liked the idea of one head to cut different size tenons so that is why I went with this one.

http://www.logwoofer.com/tenonator.php

That thing looks wicked....how does it work? Do the blades hold ok?
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Offline bandit403

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2012, 04:20:07 pm »
I have only used it once so far, but it work well for me.

Offline Cedar Savage

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2012, 10:48:28 pm »
I found this video on a shaving horse, it would be handy to have.
Gonna have to make one....


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Offline justallan1

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2013, 12:16:50 pm »
I'm thinking of making one of the Tenonators. I think they would work great.

Offline newstick

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Re: Debarking wood for log furniture
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2013, 06:04:55 pm »
Any one have to know what a tenonizer is? you can find it on the web. I have one it works great. They attach to your table saw. My friend built his own and it works pretty well.
Also for peeling Makita makes a curved planner they work pretty good.I use mine on tougher logs.
Another thing is what Draw knife a person uses. I have a Barr and it works better than any others I've used. 'keep it sharpe" A guy that peels for me can out peel that angle grinder with his Barr draw knife. "He is very tough" :o
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