The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:




TimberKing Sawmills




Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Forest Products Industry Insurance


Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades


Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: Log framing, not log homes! Question.  (Read 3720 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Satamax

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 971
  • Location: South eastern alps, in France but right on the italian border.
  • Gender: Male
Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« on: November 13, 2011, 05:23:38 pm »
Hi everybody.

Well, i'm not too keen on log homes, as round wood piled up. Hand hewn to me looks better.

But for the sake of pleasing customers, i'd like to learn something new.

I'd like to learn how to make roves, king post, hammer beam, stub tie beam, queen post, timber framing and the rest out of logs, kept round.

Is there a book about log timber framing?

I know i've got to work from chalk centerlines. An aquaintance, log home builder, told me he uses lasers too. I know part of the old style, drawing the frame to be made on the ground stacking the pieces of wood on top with bearers, so they are all in the same plane, even if not flat. Then they report lines from the ground drawing onto the  wood with a special plumb bob, which is pointy. And from the points given by the plumb bob, they trace with a chalk line.

But after all this, i wonder, i know they used to make reference faces, joint planes, and all this. I know i could work some ways, done some in the past. I can do dual line squaring, or even four lines. But i'd like to know how they were doing it in the very old times, before hand hewing started.

Thanks a lot guys.

French CD4 sawmill. Latil TL 73. Self moving hydraulic crane. Iveco daily 4x4 lwb.

Offline jdtuttle

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 787
  • Age: 61
  • Location: Candor, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • If it's worth doin, it's worth doin right
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2011, 06:39:34 am »
A Timber Framer's Workshop, By Steve Chappell is a good start.
jim
Have a great day

Offline jander3

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 596
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Red Wing, Minnesota
  • Gender: Male
    • Peeling Logs
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2011, 08:49:04 am »
Piece en piece log cabin construction works well with posts beams and such.  

B. Allan Mackie has some books that should give you a general feel for scribing, cutting lateral grooves...general log cabin building

http://www.amazon.com/mn/search/?ref%5F=nb%5Fsb%5Fnoss&url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=B.%20Allan%20Mackie&x=13&y=18&rd=1

I suggest "Building with Logs" and the "Owner-Built Log House".


If you are framing with round logs, you snap 4 lines on the log and work from the lines.  However, to get a fit that looks good, you will have to learn to scribe.  

 



You can still see the ink lines on this king post.  I worked everything from the lines, that way the post was plumb and true when installed.
 
Jon

Offline bigshow

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 231
  • Location: South Dakota
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2011, 10:34:54 am »
I built a log truss once.  I measured each log to get an average of each of their dimensions.  I then built a big plywood deck that was strong and level.  Drew the truss on the plywood, then i put the logs up on blocks, I had snapped lines on the logs to help me visualize a square member in each - I made sure the lines i snapped were level with the deck.

then using plumb bob and calipers with a level on them, i transferred the drawings on the deck to the logs.  i have no idea if this is how logs are supposed to be scribed.  just seemed like it would work, and it pretty much did.
I never try anything, I just do it.

Offline Satamax

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 971
  • Location: South eastern alps, in France but right on the italian border.
  • Gender: Male
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2011, 11:46:55 pm »
Thanks a lot guys.

French CD4 sawmill. Latil TL 73. Self moving hydraulic crane. Iveco daily 4x4 lwb.

Offline frwinks

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 190
  • Location: The Hills, ON
  • Gender: Male
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2011, 10:32:11 am »
I see a lot of log trusses that are reduced/squared up at the joint locations to make the joinery simpler.  Not many that are fully scribed.  Jander, do you have a pic of the completed truss, did you square up the end the beam or fully scribed?   

Offline jander3

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 596
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Red Wing, Minnesota
  • Gender: Male
    • Peeling Logs
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2011, 03:35:51 pm »
To simplify a truss, it is easier to flatten the areas where you make the joints.   Also, cutting the king post flat on two sides makes framing in the gables a little quicker. 




For this truss, the joint areas were flattened.  The lower chord is a fully scribed log that goes on the builiding in the traditional manner.  This truss is bolted for insurance. 
Jon

Offline oklalogdog

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton, Oklahoma
  • Gender: Male
  • ERC - Pretty Ain't It?
    • Wild West Creations
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2011, 07:16:47 pm »
James Mitchell has two very good books packed full of info.

The Craft of Modular Post and Beam
and
Short Log Construction.

The latter is the Bible (for lack of a better word) for Piece on Piece log construction.
Amateurs built the Ark - Professionals built the Titanic

TK 2000, TK 1220, Belsaw M14, John Deere 7610 with loader, Ford 9N.

Offline bigshow

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 231
  • Location: South Dakota
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2011, 08:49:34 am »
jander, that sure looks an awefully lot like a group photo from a class at Great Lakes LogBuilding :)

the best thing i picked up from Ron's class was my favorite unit of measurement: a hair

I never try anything, I just do it.

Offline jander3

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 596
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Red Wing, Minnesota
  • Gender: Male
    • Peeling Logs
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2011, 10:53:15 am »
Bigshow,

You are quite right.  I went up to Ely for a weekend a few years back and helped Ron cut the ridge and pulins for one of the class buildings (with a few guys from one of his recent classes).   I was getting ready to put the roof on the Stump Ranch and wanted to see how others approached this task. 

A moose hair...is one degree of measurement, very useful for building.   A hair is a finely tuned (and often colorful) unit to use for a measurement scale...

 
Jon

Offline barbender

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5172
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Deer River MN
  • Gender: Male
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2011, 11:21:51 am »
B. Allen Mackie has a book called "Notches Of All Kinds" (if I remember the title correctly). It shows the methods behind several kinds of trusses.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Satamax

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 971
  • Location: South eastern alps, in France but right on the italian border.
  • Gender: Male
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2011, 06:37:11 pm »
Thanks a lot guys.
French CD4 sawmill. Latil TL 73. Self moving hydraulic crane. Iveco daily 4x4 lwb.

Offline Raphael

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1116
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Warren, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • Willing and able to do a boring job.
Re: Log framing, not log homes! Question.
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2011, 01:34:45 pm »
A set of bubble scribes from Big Timberworks in Bozeman MT (actually Gallatin Gateway) is ideal for joining round to round.
... he was middle aged,
and the truth hit him like a man with no parachute.
 --Godley & Creme

Stihl 066, MS 362 C-M & 24+ feet of Logosol M7 mill