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Author Topic: Treating pine poles  (Read 3656 times)

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Offline Two-Lady-Sawyers

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Treating pine poles
« on: April 26, 2010, 10:50:09 am »
Ok fella's I need your help here. We are starting our shed for our mill and other farm equipment. Will be a single slope roof. 24 x 100 so plenty big. Poles will be white and red pine. What is the best way to treat  the butts against rot, ourselves? They will be set 5ft in the ground on concrete footers, then backfilled with crushed stone. I am felling the trees today and will start setting them mid June.
Thank in advance for any advice.
Jillian
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Offline Ernie

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2010, 07:51:04 pm »
Creosote????
A very wise man once told me . Grand children are great, we should have had them first

Offline 1938farmall

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2010, 10:18:02 pm »
hello,  we just finished an open shed 32x100 and used popple posts anchored to concrete piers (12" tubes).  rather than depend upon poles in the ground to stabilize the building, we used knee braces to lock it solid.  are you using trusses for the 24'span?  we are less than 1/2hour from you - send an email if you would like to look.  al
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Offline Meadows Miller

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2010, 10:32:08 am »
Gday

Al you arnt mucking aroud with the size you can never have too much shed  ;) :D ;D ;D 8) 8)

what sort of poles are you using H/wood or Pine ? I only use Cca pine or Ironbark poles and Erine said it with Creosote  ;) as thas what i use on them in the iground portion aswell  with both  ;)

Regards Chris
4TH Generation Timbergetter

Offline 1938farmall

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2010, 11:31:11 am »
Chris,  we built the whole shed out of poplar (popple locally) which will rot easily if exposed to repeated wet/dry cycles - but the price was right  ;D   Since creosote is not available here we set them up above grade on concrete piers anchored in with strap iron.  the eave log is 11' high; the ridge log is 16' high; and the overhangs are 4'.  we used knee braces in all directions off the posts - it is very solid.  only mistake was using log rafters instead of trusses - veeeerrrrrryyyy time consuming to get purlins for the tin even close to uniform off the 22' rafters (even though i sawed 2 sides flat).  al
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Offline Two-Lady-Sawyers

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2010, 01:57:40 pm »
This is what we are plannig for a saw shed. We have a couple of modifications in mind. 

Politically incorrect (LH feed) Foley-Belsaw M14 W/mods, Ford Ranger 4cyl 4sp power plant, Oliver Super 88RC, 93 Ford F150 4x4, Echo CS530, Echo CS306, Half finished log arch

Offline stonebroke

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2010, 05:35:39 pm »
You might want to do it like Mortons does it, Pressured treated 2by6s in the ground and then switch to regular lumber above, laminated poles.

Stonebroke

Offline 1938farmall

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2010, 07:33:15 pm »
your shed is going to be way more pretty than ours - very nice design.  surprised you need steel beams on only 12' spans.  maybe extend the roof 2' on the low side to protect the poles?  there is some interesting info on treating poles here..... http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,36632.0.html
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Offline Two-Lady-Sawyers

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2010, 08:42:04 pm »
Al, Actually the steel beams will be at three points in the building. They will span two bays. This is to enable the movement of 20'+ logs and sawn beams for the TF house. The entire shed will have walls and sliding doors. Also going to install gutters on it to catch rain water, that will be directed to large storage tanks and used for fire fighting if needed and overflow from those tanks will go into a couple of small ponds we will use for the veggie gardens.

Stonebroke, I will have to look into that. Do you have any links that would show me how it is done.

Thanks guys,
Jillian
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Offline 1938farmall

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2010, 08:58:11 pm »
with walls & doors all around i can't see much to worry about.  if you decide to go with the laminated post idea there are several suppliers of plastic sleeves to wrap around the post where it enters the ground to prevent rot-off.  here is the morton link.........

http://www.mortonbuildings.com/Three-Member-Laminated-Pine-Columns.aspx
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Offline stonebroke

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2010, 09:34:10 pm »
Google post protector for plastic sleeves for posts

Stonebroke

Offline jander3

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2010, 09:51:51 pm »



Generally, I don't like to put posts in the ground.  I would rather attach to some type of pier, this one is 42" deep to get below the frost-line, it is 18-20" in diameter, and filled with sack-crete, rock, and rebar.  in this case, I set stumps on the piers to support the cabin.

I have treated shed pine poles with motor oil and put them in the ground. They hold up well, but I don't believe this is a long-term solution.
Jon
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Offline Two-Lady-Sawyers

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2010, 11:48:49 pm »
Thanks for all the advice guys. I will be calling a company about the plastic post protectors in the morning. Now the next step since we will need square posts instead of round, I will need to find someone close that can cut 22'-24' logs. Dang it, I was just going to use some of my smaller pine. Find them tall enough to get my length, with 6" at the tops. Heck my grandpa  told me always keep your plans flexable.
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Offline 1938farmall

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2010, 09:31:21 am »
gotta be a way to use your own poles.  maybe wrap them with some self adhering flashing membrane (menards) if you are really convinced you need it.  good luck,  al
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Offline wwsjr

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2010, 10:27:19 am »
I built a shed for horses using 4" angle iron in concrete. I set the angle about 2' slightly above ground line with 3' in concrete. I welded cross pieces of rebar to the angle to reinforce in the concrete. I then used carriage bolts thru 6"X 6" SYP posts. No ground contact with the wood. Two foot overhang, 8 years, no rot.
Retired US Army, Full Time Sawyer since 2001. 2013 LT40HD Super with 25HP 3 Phase, Command Control with Accuset2. ED26 WM Edger, Ford 3930 w/FEL, Prentice Log Loader. Stihl 311, 170 & Logrite Canthooks. WM Million BF Club Member.

Offline ljmathias

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Re: Treating pine poles
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2010, 10:16:18 pm »
I agree about not putting the posts in the ground- just asking for future trouble and all the work that goes with splicing in new poles that are above ground then anyway.  In fact, with untreated wood, you need to protect the bottom from water immersion and uptake- with a concrete pier system and a bolt or piece of rebar sticking up, you get some lateral movement prevention but no up-lift prevention.  I use the metal supports that sit right in the concrete piers with the top part providing a 1" moisture break so the bottom of the poles are above the top of the piers (if that makes sense  :D ).  How's the old saying go about an ounce of prevention?  Even if it costs a little more, in the long run you save time and money (oh, and the possibility of the shed falling over on you or your equipment some dark and rainy night).  Remember: Mother Nature made all kinds of bugs to eat up wood in contact with wet ground... and they're always hungry!   :-*

Lj
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