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Author Topic: Filing rakers question  (Read 10275 times)

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Offline sprintfan11

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Filing rakers question
« on: October 22, 2009, 11:06:02 am »
I have been hand sharpening my chains and the results have been pretty good, (at least I'm getting better at it  ;) but I haven't done much filing on the rakers. If the saw seems to not get a good bite at first and then after a second or two starts cutting good, is that a sign of too much raker height? What's the best way to file them down? I have the Husky sharpening kit with the roller device (I don't use) but it has a small metal template with two opening marked hard wood and soft wood. How exactly do I mount that over the chain tooth and raker to be able to file correctly? Or should I just round file the dang thing and use a different technique?

Thanks
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Offline beenthere

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2009, 11:07:28 am »
That metal plate on that roller guide is what I use. Works well for me, if you don't have the safety chain.

If for hardwoods, use the side marked as such. Fit the small slot in behind the raker, and use a good fine flat file to file off what protrudes above the plate.

I find the roller guide the best way yet to hand file too.  :)

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Offline sprintfan11

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2009, 11:23:35 am »
That metal plate on that roller guide is what I use. Works well for me, if you don't have the safety chain.

If for hardwoods, use the side marked as such. Fit the small slot in behind the raker, and use a good fine flat file to file off what protrudes above the plate.

I find the roller guide the best way yet to hand file too.  :)

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Does the plate rest on the tooth next to the raker? I mounted it that way but was unsure.

I switched to full chisel chains after getting some sound advice here and haven't used the roller at all anymore. I just clamp the saw in my workmate and sharpen.
Use up, wear out, make do or do without.

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Offline RSteiner

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2009, 11:25:37 am »
I use either an Oregon or Stihl raker gauge.  If I remember right the average depth the raker wants to be from the top of the tooth is .025".

Too high raker height will produce fine chips and you will have to push on the saw a bit to make it cut.  Too low raker height will make the chain grabby and not smooth cutting at all, especially when trying to make a plunge cut.

Randy
Randy

Offline beenthere

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2009, 11:36:51 am »
I switched from hand filing my chisel chains with no guide to the roller, and find the roller gives me good depth adjustment without having to fret over that one variable.

Here is a pic of the raker plate in position. Hope it helps.
south central Wisconsin
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Offline sprintfan11

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2009, 11:41:07 am »
I switched from hand filing my chisel chains with no guide to the roller, and find the roller gives me good depth adjustment without having to fret over that one variable.

Here is a pic of the raker plate in position. Hope it helps.
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Thanks a ton, exactly what I was looking for. ;D
Use up, wear out, make do or do without.

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Offline Rocky_J

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2009, 11:50:43 am »
Use the gauge to check the raker height, but move it out of the way to file the raker. A good flat file works well, just keep your stroke and pressure consistent and after the first one or two you will know exactly how many strokes to take on each raker to get them all fixed up right.

I don't even use a gauge any more, I just eyeball it by laying the file flat across the tops of the teeth and sighting the gap between the top of the raker and the bottom of the file. Then I know if I need to take 1, 2 or 3 strokes on each raker. It's all part of the sharpening process and only takes a couple minutes once you've done it a thousand times.  ;)

Offline beenthere

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2009, 12:17:14 pm »
I leave the gauge there, and takes all the eyeballing, guessing, and risk of slipping with the flat file (and hitting the just-sharpened tooth  :-[ :-[ ) out of the process. Only file what sticks through that the file can reach.  No risk of filing too much. And I don't have to bend over to look 'neath the file at the gap.  ;D

If more bite is desired, then use the softwood notch.

This guage I like better, because it sets each raker for each tooth. Some other guages set on top of 2-3 teeth, and results in a raker based on the highest tooth, not the adjacent tooth.

I don't have as much experience as Rocky_J so will yield to him.  :)
south central Wisconsin
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Offline ely

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2009, 03:41:11 pm »
doubtful i have as much experience either but i do it just like rocky says. ;D.
never even seen one of those dohickys yall posted.

Offline Reddog

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2009, 04:04:55 pm »
I have a couple gages I use in the shop. But find most times in the field I use the Rocky J technique  of just laying the file across the teeth and seeing what the gap is.

Offline ErikC

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2009, 11:35:33 pm »
I use the file trick too, it's just kind of a checkup really. After a lot of sharpening you just sort of get a feel for it. I like about one good swipe more off the rakers than what the gizmos give me. If you aren't wanting to risk it though, file them with the tool-- It's pretty easy and maybe some peace of mind.
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Offline Tree Reb

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2009, 08:17:19 am »
I have a couple gages I use in the shop. But find most times in the field I use the Rocky J technique  of just laying the file across the teeth and seeing what the gap is.

Not much point me being here, you guys seem to have it under control.  lol splitwood_smiley

Offline sprintfan11

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2009, 08:37:36 am »
I have a couple gages I use in the shop. But find most times in the field I use the Rocky J technique  of just laying the file across the teeth and seeing what the gap is.

Not much point me being here, you guys seem to have it under control.  lol splitwood_smiley
I will always welcome more input and advice, especially input and advice from here! ;D
Use up, wear out, make do or do without.

Husqvarna 455 Rancher 20"
1994 GMC 1500 4X4
Central Boiler 5036 OWB
Troy-Built 27 ton splitter
Generac 6500 generator
More stuff to come....

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2009, 08:53:22 pm »
I'am possibly a crude dude but I just eyeball them and kiss them on the bench grinder,rounding the front slightly.Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2009, 10:32:26 pm »
I just hit them with the file. When the saw is sharp, but feels like it's cutting slow, I hit them each once or twice, depending on the species I'm sawing. I take them down a bit in white pine, but that makes it grabby in ash or locust. ;)
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Offline SawTroll

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2009, 09:32:56 pm »
That metal plate on that roller guide is what I use. Works well for me, if you don't have the safety chain.

If for hardwoods, use the side marked as such. Fit the small slot in behind the raker, and use a good fine flat file to file off what protrudes above the plate.

I find the roller guide the best way yet to hand file too.  :)

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Those sure works nicely for filing rakers, but you need the right one for the chain at hand!    8) 8) 8)
Firewood saws: Jonsereds Raket 621 (1970), Husky 353G, Stihl MS361W, Husky 372xpg, New Edition Husky 339xp, Dolmar PS5100SH, New Edition Husky 346xpg, Jonsered 2153WH, Husky 560xpg.

Offline barbender

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2009, 11:13:04 am »
 I like to take them down enough that the saw pulls into the wood, not me having to push it. That is farther than the .025 or .030 that the guages are usually set for. I just count my strokes with the flat file when I take them down, about every 4th sharpening. A chainsaw grinder with a 1/2" stone would be the most consistent way though. The tendency for kickback increases when you take the rakers down, the saw will definately be grabbier so BE CAREFUL!!
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Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2009, 07:36:04 am »
This subject is worth bringing to the top.Raker hight depends on your saw along with ability.If you have a wimpy weekender saw go by the book.If you own a big honken powerfull saw especially one with a shorter bar you can take a bigger chip.Big thing have it safe for its use and your ability.Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline iceman7668

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2009, 08:52:45 am »
Can this filing guide be used on stihl chain?
John D Myers

Offline Reddog

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Re: Filing rakers question
« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2009, 09:23:09 am »
Can this filing guide be used on stihl chain?

Yes :)