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Author Topic: black locust  (Read 11002 times)

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Offline rasman57

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Re: black locust
« Reply #60 on: April 05, 2017, 11:31:41 pm »
Those log sleds are really spectacular.  I had to lookup a Lombard and yours are even better.  Sure would love to see those in action.  Good work!

Offline Roxie

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Re: black locust
« Reply #61 on: April 06, 2017, 08:18:45 am »
Loggah, your pictures are always incredible!  The shot of you sitting on the sled, shows the scale of it perfectly.   :)
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Offline Jemclimber

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Re: black locust
« Reply #62 on: April 07, 2017, 09:11:40 am »
I made my deck from it and like many people, wish I had access to more logs. I've also made Adirondack chairs from black locust, (to replace the plastic ones).

 

  
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Offline POSTONLT40HD

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Re: black locust
« Reply #63 on: April 07, 2017, 08:35:23 pm »
That looks GREAT Jem!

I'm thinking......

Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: black locust
« Reply #64 on: April 08, 2017, 07:48:56 am »
Wish I could get some here.
My builder friend says the new PT is crap.
Built a sugar house with BL 6x6 poles in the mid 70's still very much intact, but had to drill it to get those old ring shank pole barn nails in
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Offline Gtodoug

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Re: black locust
« Reply #65 on: April 09, 2017, 03:00:27 pm »
Rare exit for me here from lurking...  I have an extensive amount of black locust on our old family property.  The small plot of black locust planted in the 1930s/40s was intended to be harvested.  Long story, but no harvesting ever took place and the small plot has propagated all thru the property so I have access to some rather large (sometimes straight, sometimes, not so much).  Many of the originally planted ones have fallen due to the shallow root it seems to have. 

I've poured thru the forums trying to soak up all the info available so this thread is very timely.  I've gathered up a assortment of blades from Frozen hardwood to bimetal and stellite.  The later I was thinking might work on the trees that had already fallen.  Based on how hard I already know cutting dried black locust is with a chainsaw, I don't have much hope for even the stellite bladeon these dried logs.  Am I off base?

I have only cut one tree thus far.  Dropped a fresh 10-12 inch one last fall.   It was clearly dense, but not bad at all to cut with a normal blade.  Not sure if this is the only one in existence, but what kid in Indiana shouldn't grow up with a Goalrilla with a 6" black locust post? (Craigslist find, post was trashed). Not being sure if it would twist,  I let it season over the winter. It did not move at all, so I just put it in a couple weeks back.



Next project in the next few weeks is a lot bigger,  I want to put a new privacy fence in. I would like to put the fence in when the wood is still green. I am very much a newbie Sawyer and feel like I am overthinking how to saw it.  Is it ok to just flat saw it?  How much offset pith is trouble? Since I want to put it up green (I don't want to have to drill  holes for a huge fence) is it ok to go ahead double nail it or just one nail for a few weeks / months to keep splitting to a minimum?

I expect after cutting and building the fence I'll have better answers for the other project... The eternal black locust cabin....  (Something else I'm not sure exists!)
Just starting...
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Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: black locust
« Reply #66 on: April 09, 2017, 05:34:51 pm »
I resawed a very dry black locust 12x12 with a 1 1/4"x.055" 4 DoubleHard band with no trouble. It did take plenty of hp.
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Offline Ox

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Re: black locust
« Reply #67 on: April 09, 2017, 05:59:53 pm »
Black locust is the most stable and shrink resistant wood I've ever milled.  The pith is basically non existent in a solid tree.  Flat saw through and through and you'll have no troubles.  At least I didn't.  Posts, boards, whatever doesn't warp, twist or crack.  It's the best wood ever.  The only drawback is driving nails or screws after it's seasoned.  You'll likely need to pre-drill.
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1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: black locust
« Reply #68 on: April 09, 2017, 06:19:33 pm »
What do your logs look like? Are they nice and straight? It's hard to find straight stuff around here. I get a fair bit of degrade in locust.
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Offline Ox

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Re: black locust
« Reply #69 on: April 09, 2017, 06:54:03 pm »
My logs are pretty straight, for locust that is.  I think I'm fairly lucky cause just about every one I've ever milled was solid through.  But these were crowded when they grew, so fast and straight was the rule for them.  I'm not sure how they would grow out in the middle of a field.  A tangled mess, maybe?  Beats me.  There's some down by where I grew up that are close to 6 feet across.  No kidding!  I'll get pics of them someday with someone standing in front for scale.  I've never seen anything like them.  Probably about 5 feet of them is hollow by now!
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools