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Author Topic: Sawing frozen oak  (Read 9986 times)

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2007, 07:30:10 am »
Hey Brucer, family members bringing you logs from the east now?  ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline sprucebunny

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #41 on: November 30, 2007, 07:45:08 am »
Since the mill sawed fine one day and not the next, I'm guessing the problem was a combination of things that you all mentioned, but not the blade guides.

The logs have been on the ground since last spring and some of the bark is coming off so I think the outsides may be dryer. The problems always occur on the second cut- the one after the bark is off- so there could be dryer and wetter wood.
Also I think wild grain and wood tension is a factor.

If it had been my log, I would have cut it through the middle to see if it cut funny there but the customer doesn't want his oak in funny shapes  ;)

If I get caught up cutting firewood, I'll try an oak log I found in my yard.
MS193, MS192 and an 026  Weeding and Thinning. Gilbert Champion sawmill

Offline Brucer

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #42 on: December 02, 2007, 03:04:44 am »
Hey Brucer, family members bringing you logs from the east now?  ;D

Naw, family knows they're supposed to bring maple syrup ;D.

Got a lot of transplanted Ontarians and Quebecois in these parts. Something to do with the skiing.

Rossland = Red Moutain = Nance Greene & Karen Lee Gartner.
Bruce    LT40HDG28 bandsaw with two 6' extensions.
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Offline jackpine

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #43 on: December 06, 2007, 01:06:25 pm »
Another thing I re-learned yesterday about sawing half frozen oak. When you can not get a good cut, try changing bands. Some bands which will cut un-frozen wood just fine will not cut half frozen wood at all without waves. I believe the problem is inconsistent set in the teeth either because it was not set properly or the band hit a stone or something in the bark that affected only a few teeth. As soon as I changed bands the problem went away and I was able to saw until that band was extremely dull. I do not believe sharpness is as much of an issue as set,imho.

Bill

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #44 on: December 06, 2007, 02:15:50 pm »
Brucer, seems to me job would be first priority wouldn't it? I've skied before and it didn't pay too good.  ::)  :D

I'm not educated enough in the sports arena so them names don't mean a thing to this country boy.  ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline getoverit

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #45 on: December 06, 2007, 09:18:29 pm »
talking about negative aqngle blades and how they cut, next time you need to cut some sheet metal (barn roofing or siding), try putting a plywood blade in your skillsaw backwards

you will be amazed at how good it cuts through the tin.  It makes no sense that it will cut at all, but somehow it does.
I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok, I work all night and sleep all day

Offline Furby

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #46 on: December 06, 2007, 09:32:25 pm »
Just be careful doing that as carbides can come off and go flying.

Offline WH_Conley

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #47 on: December 06, 2007, 09:36:53 pm »
DON'T USE CARBIDE.

Don't ask me how I know this.

I was the one that always got to cut the metal, maybe because I was deaf, deef, whatever, nobody likes the scream, use hearing protection.
Bill

Offline getoverit

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #48 on: December 06, 2007, 10:34:47 pm »
plywood blades dont have carbides...
I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok, I work all night and sleep all day

Offline Furby

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #49 on: December 06, 2007, 10:44:06 pm »
Some do, do a google. :)

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Sawing frozen oak
« Reply #50 on: December 07, 2007, 02:09:33 pm »
When I put the replacement steal on the shed roof this summer/fall we used a skill saw to trim some pieces. We did the whole stack at one time. I think 10 or 11 sheets at once. Eye protection was used and I was told to stand back during the cutting.  ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry