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Author Topic: Blade Tooth Setting  (Read 6022 times)

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Offline ARKANSAWYER

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2003, 07:12:08 am »
   I have cross cut saws and rip saws.  They are ground the way they are for a reason.  
    Crosscut saws have an angle ground for cutting across the fibers to make the cut. (Like the saws all blade and EZ's angle cut blade.   It is designed to slice the fibers into or cut across the grain.
    Rip saws are flat across the tooth tip so they rip or chisel cut the fibers apart.  The face cuts but the corners bear the most pressure.  As the set increases so does the wear.  This is why a ground and then set blades cuts smoother and last better.  The whole face is cutting.  When I need to make really fine and smooth cuts I put on a 0.055 re-sharp.
 Hit a nail and you will notice that there is some metal cold welded to the inside of the tooth.  I offten take a chainsaw file and starting in the gullet and pulling down and out at the same time and "clean" off the face of the tooth.  A bad tooth I just flatten with needle nose pliers and 90% of the time I can still saw with the blade to finish the log with known hardware.  I have done this up to 6 times in one log with one blade.
  If you take a stump and stand it up inside and clamp it and saw across the grain you will notice the differance in a set/sharpened as to a sharpened/set blade in the smoothness of the cut and the sawdust.  A set/sharpened (good rip grind) makes a rougher finish and long curley sawdust.  A sharpened/set makes a smoother cut and fine sawdust.  This is why I use new blades when cutting rounds.  
   The pressure is on the outside of the blade as is most of the wear.  The blade bending around the wheels tends to bend the blade flat.   There was a good article in "Sawmill & Woodlot" about hand saws and it told of the differance between rip and cross cut saw blades and it applies the same to band mills and circle blades.  Just about all hand saws and circle blades for hand tools has a combination grind blades so the can cut across and with the grain (ie sawsall blade).  I hope this is as clear as the lower Mississippi River.
ARKANSAWYER

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Offline Fla._Deadheader

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2003, 09:49:06 am »
Good explanation, Arky. NOW, is there a special way that you clamp the piece for "rounds"? What would keep the bottom of the piece from kicking out and ruining the blade?? We will be sawing table slabs from the Cypress sinkers and this is a real concern. I'm not real comfortable with the band mill yet. ::)



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Offline Minnesota_boy

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2003, 10:38:21 am »
Band mills are much more forgiving than circle mills when it comes to poor clamping. However, pieces can come loose and cause trouble.  The band pulls the piece of wood toward the sawdust chute, so you need to support the wood on that side and run the clamp up against the bottom so it doesn't tip over.  The pressure caused by the movement of the head is much lower but still need to be taken into account. I usually just clamp the pieces against a log stop and make the cut slowly so there isn't much pressure endways.
I eat a high-fiber diet.  Lots of sawdust!

Offline EZ

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2003, 03:39:00 am »
Ended up with 1200 bf on that job with the same blade, I have'nt touch the blade as far as resharpening or setting, still sawing strait boards. Pushing the carrage threw is the same as I started. I notice the saw dust seem to shoot strait out of the shoot, instead of going all over the place.
EZ

Offline D._Frederick

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2003, 12:21:14 pm »
Ark-,
I don't under stand your sentence "as the set increases so does the wear" . Do you mean the that the wider set has more of the top(face) of the outside teeth cutting hence more wear?
When I hit iron and the points of the tooth is damage, I put a flat ground stone (no radii on edge) on the grinder and set it at a 20 degree angle. I grind off about .020 of the tip of the tooth, then I grind the face of the tooth. I loose a little of the gullet but the blade still cuts well.
Also please explain what "The pressure on the out side of the blade as is most of the wear". Do you mean that the bottom teeth that are cutting into the log wear faster than the teeth on top of the log.?  I am not trying to nit-pick your posting, but would like to know in more detail the point you are making--Thanks.

Offline EZ

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2003, 06:18:09 pm »
Tom,
I ask my blade sharpener guy if he could sharpen a blade like the one I did, he has some kind of auto sharpener and said there was no setting for this kind of sharping. Right now I have sawn 1800 bf with this blade, without resharping. I wood like to find a setup to sharpen a blade with this angle I have on it before it breaks. Could you help me fine a sharpener that wood. Thanks
EZ

Offline Neil_B

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #26 on: April 15, 2003, 06:48:23 pm »
EZ,
check out the link below, I think that's what your looking for. I mentioned this one on page one of this post. I just ordered one and hopefully will show up next week. They have a listing of all their dealers, head office is Australia, for North America.
www.dinasaw.com.au
Timberwolf / TimberPro sawmill, Woodmizer edger, both with Kubota diesels. '92 Massey Ferguson 50H backhoe, '92 Ford F450 with 14' dump/ flatbed and of course an '88 GMC 3500 pickup.

Offline Tom

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #27 on: April 15, 2003, 06:59:40 pm »
Yes,New Sawyer,  that is the company I was referring to.  Their MSA option is what I remember seeing on a video. This is the only small sharpener that I have ever seen that controls every position of the grinder head.

EZ, there are several band sawmill manufacturer's who are dealer for these grinders.  I know of no blade maintenance companies that advertise a service like this.
extinct

Offline ARKANSAWYER

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Re: Blade Tooth Setting
« Reply #28 on: April 16, 2003, 05:59:08 am »
D,
Yep!  As more set is put on the blade the more of the tooth sticking out from center.  When there is no set each tooth follows the one in front and takes a smaller bite of wood since the teeth in front keep it from biting too deep.  When you set the teeth apart it cuts in a different path then the tooth in front of it so it gets to bite more wood.  Still part of the tooth follows the path cut by the tooth in front of it and the out side half of the tooth cuts a new path.  As set increases more and more of the tooth is exposed.   If you have less spacing, say 3/4 instead of 7/8 or 1 inch then you have more teeth per foot of blade shareing the work and they have less stress per tooth but also have less bite so they may not remove as much wood per pass but make a smoother cut.  A 1 inch has a bigger bite and rougher finish and more gullet to remove the wood so may cut faster but the teeth will suffer greater wear.
  So if a tooth is sticking out from center it has a greater exposed cutting surface and it will be wearing more on the corner of the tooth.  On my blades there is a tooth bent up then down, straight and back up again.  So it is 2 5/8 inches from point to point that are facing the same way.  The raker tooth does not hardly ever wear since it follows the cutting edge of the teeth in front of it.  Look at your blade after you cut for a bit and you will notice that it is shinny on the points where it sticks out the farthest.
 More set is neede on soft woods so they do not pinch the blade and you have to have some set or your blade will bet very hot dragging through the wood.
 The article on hand saw blades was not in "Sawmill & Woodlot" but in "Timber Framing".
 My hydralics hold the stumps very good and I have not lost one yet in the hundards that I have sawn.  On some I have had to notch the bottom so that it would clamp good but the hydralics hold well.
ARKANSAWYER
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