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Author Topic: Metal in the Log  (Read 1789 times)

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Offline Jacar

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Metal in the Log
« on: March 26, 2003, 12:32:33 pm »
I've read many posts of some of the things you guys have found in logs.  A neighbor down the road gave me some real nice SYP.  The logs were straight, clear, and tight ringed.  One nice 12' log had two # 10 copper wires coming out.  I figured they were stapled on and I would just pull them out with a hammer.  

I took my chain saw and started making some small cuts.  After cutting about 3" into the log I hit something hard and shiny.  There was no end to the wires.  So instead of a nice 12' log it was now 7'.  I put the 7' on the mill and cautiously  ???sawed it for some paneling.

After sharpening the chainsaw, we commenced to sawing and chopping with ax and found an electrical box w/ 16d nails imbedded about 6" into the log. >:(

Sure glad I did not try to saw it! 8)

Jack
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Offline sawmill_john

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Re: Metal in the Log
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2003, 01:35:50 pm »
Aah the joys of sawing your own lumber, even with all the stories of nasty things hit and cut its still worth it.  I've got some samples of things found, maybe every one should send in pictures of the junk they've found or had the unfortunate chance to saw thourgh.  Here is my latest prize.

The other two nails here distributed in about 3 - 2 x 6 boards, cost of these nails rang up to about $40.00 in saw teeth.

john

Offline Jeff

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Re: Metal in the Log
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2003, 05:35:05 pm »
John, what do you guys use for teeth in a MD? Our teeth average about a buck a piece.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Offline sawmill_john

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Re: Metal in the Log
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2003, 08:39:48 am »
Jeff, we use a stellite inlaid tooth, in logs with out metal you can cut from 1000 bdf to as much as 3000 bdf between sharpenings.  We buy the standard blue tip bit and send them to a guy who does the inlaid and regrinds the profile.  Our selling price is $3.45 ea. or $20.70 per saw.  We also have had carbide teeth in the past but the guy that was suppling us has dropped off the face of the earth and won't return my phone calls.

John

Offline Jeff

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Re: Metal in the Log
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2003, 12:00:21 pm »
Using blue tips and cutting debarked, clean aspen, I have sawn up to 50 or 60,000 feet between sharpening. 20 to 30,000 is common.

Watch tomorrow will be nail day now. :-X
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Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: Metal in the Log
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2003, 01:43:23 pm »
John

Have you ever tried chrome teeth?  Quite a bit cheaper - about $125/box.  

I have used blue tips on unbarked hardwood logs, and could get better than that type of production.  The chrome will last a little longer.  

They are harder to sharpen.  One the first sharpening, you need something to knock the chrome off of the face.  Either a diamond file, or an electric sharpener.  After that, I used a hand file with good results.  Files don't last as long on the chrome as it does on a standard.

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Offline Tim

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Re: Metal in the Log
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2003, 04:11:22 am »
I've found some interesting stuff in logs that have cut into the bottom line but, I think that my cousin's story is a little more gut wrenching than mine. He runs a circular as well, he decided to try a set of carbides ($5.00ea. CA$) as oppose to the cheaper high carbon bit ($1.45ea $CA) he normally uses. As soon as he changed he promptly cut into a bunch of gravel and rocks that managed to get included in the log in a seam during harvesting. His mill is a little over a mile from mine, I could faintly hear the swearing from here. He basically destroyed half of the 40 tooth change on the first cut.
Eastern White Cedar Shingles