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Author Topic: Brush cutter  (Read 8346 times)

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Offline rebocardo

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2006, 12:00:11 am »
I bought a Ryobi (you will never confuse the low quality Ryobi with a Stihl - trust me) brush cutter for $159 at Home Depot. It comes with a string trimmer attachment, I replaced it with a gator because I hate the bump function stuff and cutting a piece of 0.095 12 inches long and just sticking it the cutter head works fine.

Plus, I bought the $99 10" pole saw attachment.

I use the pole saw for brush clearing, cutting down small trees, and hacking the poison ivy, oak, and whatever down from the trees so I do not have to wade into it. Then once the big stuff and overhead stuff is done, I go back over the yard or lot with the 3 blade brush cutter.

My main thing was I wanted a gas powered pole saw, a brush cutter, and string trimmer and just wanted to quickly swap attachments. The Home Depot stuff was  <$300 with a roll of string. The Stihl was about 4x that (the pole saw attachment is very expensive), though the Stihl is vastly superior both in quality, balance, power, and reach.

The Stihl weighs much more with its thick walled pole, but, it feels balanced better and would not kill your hands after one hour of overhead use. Plus, it cuts a lot faster, I had someone do some trimming for me and his Stihl was way quicker then the Ryobi set up.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2006, 04:23:01 am »
Here's my saw from an earlier thread.





My saw is 3 years old. Apprently they don't use the yellow felt air filters any longer. All they have is a screen with a fine mess covering.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline bee_pipes

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2006, 06:18:58 am »
We've got lots of hills, lots of rocks, and about 10 acres of cleared meadow. Each year saplings spring up all over, fill the roads leading to the back 30, and encroach on the field. Too much slope to use a tractor safely, and high grass & brush make a great place for mice and the snalkes that love them. We finally bought a DR brush mower after a year of using an old Murray push mower. Murray was a local manufacturer out here that has recently gone out of business - too bad - that old push mower was a real trooper - a 4 hp B&S, it would chew down small sapplings. The DR will chew stuff up to 2.5 inch diameter without even stuttering. In particular good for the hill behind the house - was a real chore to keep that cleared. Was a bit pricey, but after hemming and hawing for a year it has paid for itself in time saved just plowing through brush and high grass.

Regards,
Pat
Linden, Tn
I am not getting fat! I am developing a powerful set of muscles that allow me to sit for long periods of time without tiring...

Offline dancan

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2006, 06:40:46 pm »
Thanks SwampDonkey , those are the brush saws i'm talking about .
What type of clearing are you guy's doing and how are you charging the clients ?

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2006, 04:39:05 am »
We are spacing hardwood, mixed, softwoods and plantations. Our provincial government funds an $8M silviculture program on private woodlots. Our forest products marketing boards administer the program and pay the contractors or woodlot owners. In our area the woodlot owner is not charged for spacing, in other areas the owner is charges up to 10 % of the cost. The owner can also get paid to space his own ground if he does the work himself. I have a crew of five.


Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Online Mooseherder

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2006, 08:17:09 pm »
SwampDonkey, If you use that thing all day long, I admire the heck out of you!
My brother-in-law lent me the same exact machine with the harness, helmet w/shield.
It only took an hour to kick my butt.  :'(
I gotta work on my technique I guess.
Lane Circle Mill

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2006, 04:47:37 am »
Depending on the growth and terrain: You can space 1/2 acre to 1 acre per day in natural growth and 3/4 acre to 2.5 acres a day in plantation. If your just clearing you can work faster. 8 Hr days.

You are right though about technique. You can get real frustrated quick if you have a short fuse. ;D Work with the terrain, thin from the bottom of the hill work toward the top and stuff will fall behind you. Sometimes you have to direct a cut stem by hand to get it to the ground. Sometimes all it takes is a second cut for it to drop. Get a hole opened up and drop stuff into it. Just like a chain saw you can directional fell. Make sure the teeth are set and sharp. The Sthil blades that come pre-sharpened and set are not as good as the ones you have to set and sharpen yourself. Just have to work on it. ;)


Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline oakiemac

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2006, 08:22:13 am »
Submarinesailor is absolutely right. If you don't own and old Gravely then all you have is a toy. I'm not kidding. The things are built better and stronger then any tank. They have no belts or puny tubing that needs welding. I have my granpa's old gravely with a bunch of attatchments and that baby cuts some serious grass, weeds, saplings, brush,-anything that gets in its way. It will last forever the way it is built.
Anyone that has every used an old Gravely will tell you the same thing.
Mobile Demension sawmill, Bobcat 873 loader, 3 dry kilns and a long "to do" list.

Offline Tony

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2006, 10:43:33 pm »
              I guess you could call this gas powered ::)

http://www.fecon.com/bullhog/

            I saw this thing in action at Mid South Forestry Equipment Show
this weekend, and I must say very impressive :o :o :o

                                   Tony
TK1600, John Deere 4600 W\frontendloader, Woodmaster718 planer\moulder, Stihl MS461 Stihl 036 & 021 & Echo CS-370
"You cannot invade the mainland United States.  There would be a rifle behind each blade of grass."  Adm. Isoroku Yamamotto ( Japanese

Offline D._Frederick

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2006, 11:29:55 pm »
Try a Shindaiwa blade that has chain saw teeth for the cutters, works quite well on things to about an 1 1/2 inch diameter.

Offline submarinesailor

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Re: Brush cutter
« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2006, 02:43:59 pm »
Hey,

Tony, did you notice that some of FECONís require Ĺ thick LEXAN between you and it?  Whoa baby, thatís a lot of plastic! :o :o :o

Bruce