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Author Topic: Wicked pilot antics  (Read 8051 times)

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Offline woodbowl

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2006, 11:35:33 pm »
I would love to have a Rotax 582, but will have to stick with this 503 for now. The one that seized was a Cuyuna 430. Actually, it didn't lock up. It  scored the cylinder wall while gliding in on final. I taxied on in and tied up for the day. Didn't even know it untill I took off the next day. Sure is a gut pull of a feeling to be climbing out over the trees and drop about 600 RPM. :-\
Full time custom sawing at the customers site since 1995.  WoodMizer LT40 Super Hyd.

Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #21 on: May 26, 2006, 12:02:53 am »
Olen I am starting to think you have lived a good one and hope to meet you someday  ;D
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline KiwiCharlie

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2006, 06:23:15 pm »
When I was a boy, growing up on the farm, I used to go flying with the local topdressing pilots.  If early one morning I heard a Fletcher (very distictive engine noise!) coming in to one of the local strips, I would beg and plead for the day off school, and race (walk/run/bycicle) to the airstrip to hang out for as long as they were there, or the weather held good.  I knew all the pilots and they always took me up for many hours while working.  They flew low, steep climbs and drops, and even steeper turns.  Very exilarating.  I look back on those days with very fond memories.
Heres a couple of links with some pics.
http://www.aerowork.co.nz/history.htm
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/fu24.html
Oh yes - check this out.  One of the other topdressing planes used here.  The Airtruk!  What a plane.  It was so agile, it was amazing.  Not the most graceful design though!
http://www.airliners.net/search/photo.search?aircraftsearch=Transavia%20PL-12%20Airtruk&distinct_entry=true
Cheers
Charlie.
Walk tall and carry a big Stihl.

Offline VA-Sawyer

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #23 on: May 27, 2006, 12:43:30 am »
I met Mr. Hoover in Great Falls, MT. back in '80 or '81.  I had flown up from Billings to attend the airshow. Ended up staying in the same hotel as he did. A most interesting person to talk to. I would be willing to give up certain 'body parts' for a flight with him. He is a class act all the way. Back in the early 90's the FAA pulled his medical certificate for a while. Turned out to be a big political SNAFU. He didn't really have any medical problem, just had someone in the FAA mad at him. As I recall, it took over a year for him to get it back so he could do his shows here in the US again.

I used to teach aerobatics. Had a 150Hp C-150 Aerobat go stable in a spin once. It didn't want to recover...told the student to get out and hit the silk. (Note: Parachutes are required for aerobatic training and we had them on). I could tell by the look on his face that he would never remember to pull the ripcord.  He wasn't even able to pull his Emergency Door Release cable. I considered bailing anyways, but just couldn't bring myself to leave him to a certain death.  I still remember those seconds like they happened yesterday.  I tried rocking the controls from pro-spin to anti-spin and with a touch of throttle at the right moment was able to get the nose down far enough to recover from the spin. We were well below the trees by the time I was able to pull out of the resulting steep dive.  It took all the mental control I had to limit my pull on the control wheel to keep from getting a secondary stall.  Flew that plane straight back to the airport and grounded it. I checked it over nose to tail and tip to tip. Checked all the angles of control travel, and the static angles. Everything was correct. Boss man took it back up and checked it out in person. No problems with spin recovery, so it was returned to service.
I had done hundreds of spins in that exact plane with never any delay in spin recovery. To this day, I can't tell you why it didn't want to recover from that spin.   I've done spins since then, but not in that plane. Something about ' bit once...twice shy...'
VA-Sawyer

Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2006, 01:19:29 am »
VA-Sawyer I had the exact same thing happen to me for my atp license . c-150 aerobat , just a day from the check ride and spins were required back then to pass the check ride . I spun anything  that was approved but this time it wouldnt come out . Didnt have any chutes as none were needed . Seemed like a eternity and I was alone . That was the last day I ever been off the ground . The only thing I could possibly think of was one fuel had a 1/4 tank more juice .  I had to breath into a paper bag to slow my breathing down once I came out of it .  My old flight instructor use to train me for things that were never expected like flying and making landings with only allowing me to use throttle ,rudder and the trim tab and never being allowed to touch the yoke . 

In the end I wasnt having fun anymore but I think I could have really enjoyed one of those weedhoppers like Olen fly's .

I never have been to airshow but someday I hope to find the time somehow . I have seen Bob Hoover pictures when I was a kid flying his Rockwell Commander . I met Rockwell but never met the famous Bob Hoover .  I still can pop in the movie of charles lindbergh with jimmy stewart or those amazing young men in their flying machines and sit and watch it and get inspired but model airplanes is as far as I will ever take it . I hope  ???
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline VA-Sawyer

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2006, 01:37:25 am »
Did it have the Lycoming 150Hp STC installed ? If so then you are the third person I know of to have such an experience.  I met another fellow with a similar story at an Instructors Refresher in Ohio about 5 years after I had my 'little experience'.
VA-Sawyer.

Offline UNCLEBUCK

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #26 on: May 27, 2006, 02:04:53 am »
Yep , lycoming 150 in it with the trike gear and pants.  Also I use to spin a 150hp texas taildragger c-150 and never had any problems.   
UNCLEBUCK    bridge burner/bridge mender

Offline Norm

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #27 on: May 27, 2006, 08:56:57 am »
Bob Hoover is quite the legend, I remember the FAA bs and was not impressed with it. One of the major things that has turned me off to flying is all the regs and red tape to fly. The last straw was after the terrorist attacks, insurance, red tape and new rules just got worse. I keep threatening to turn the bottom field into a strip and thumb my nose to em.

UB my flight instructor would make me do the same practice for landing. No yoke controls only the power, trim and rudders right down the runway 10' off.

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2006, 09:37:02 am »
I used to watch helicopter pilots practice auto rotations, the instructor would roll the throttle off and the machine came in under no power to about 20' off the field then up to try it again. I swear these guys must do them in their sleep.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline VA-Sawyer

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2006, 01:08:49 pm »
Norm & UB,
I made my students do the 'hands off the yoke' thing too, but I made them do it all the way to touchdown.  There is a nose pich change that happens as they fly into ground effect. Most planes want to pitch down, but I've found a few that want to pitch up during the final few feet.  I also made my Insrument students do ILS approches to touchdown under the hood.  Both maneuvers did wonders for the self confidence once they were accomplished correctly.
Norm, I know what you mean about the FAA and regs. It got really bad here after 9/11.  I finally parked the plane in June of '02.  Things are finally getting better around here and I'm starting to get the bug again to fly.  Maybe I'll work on the old bird this summer and get it airworthy again.
VA-Sawyer

Offline woodbowl

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2006, 10:58:25 pm »
Olen I am starting to think you have lived a good one and hope to meet you someday  ;D

UB, I'm still looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.  :D I've had a lot of unusual fun but the adrenalin ran low when I knuckled down and had to work for a living.  ::)   I've got my nose to the grind rock with no fun in site. I need an adrenalin fix right now to snap me out of the rut. I hope to build another ultralight soon and be able to take off and land here at home.

Here's what's been going on in our neck of the woods lately.

click for shortened link
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Offline Murf

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #31 on: May 29, 2006, 10:20:28 am »
VA-Sawyer, make that the fourth person.

I had exactly the same situation, and just like UB I think it was the lack of balanced fuel tanks that either caused or greatly contributed to it.

In my case, like yours, I was just high enough to recover, except I was out over the big lake next to us when I did it. I certainly was glad there wasn't any tall sailboats out there that day!!  :D  :o
If you're going to break a law..... make sure it's Murphy's Law.

Offline VA-Sawyer

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Re: Wicked pilot antics
« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2006, 09:49:58 pm »
     Why do you guys have unbalanced fuel loads in a C-150 while doing aerobatics ?  The fuel selector is either ON or OFF.  If the ball is kept in the center during climbout then any unbalance of fuel will be self correcting.  It was just part of the checklist prior to 'extreem banking and yanking' to double check the engine and fuel guages. (Bossman always made us watch the oil pressure during 0 or negative gees, as we were allowed only 30 seconds of such fun after the pressure fell off.)
     I can remember a few times (usally when the spin would exceed 12 turns ) that the fuel pickups would be unported long enough for the engine to suffer fuel starvation. If you kept the spin going after that, you could get the prop to stop. It would cause a pretty rough shudder in the engine mounts as it came to a halt. It is kinda weird sitting in a spinning plane and the only thing you hear is the air buffeting over the wings and tail, and the sound of the stall warning honking at you. It is almost hypnotic. Recovery is no problem, as the prop starts windmilling again as the airspeed goes over 115-120 during the pullout.   Yep, those were fun times.  Too bad the insurance companies had to kill'em.
VA-Sawyer