Archive
AVAILABLE




TimberKing Sawmills



The Largest Inventory of Used Chainsaw Parts in the World

Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools


Forest Products Industry Insurance

Norwood Industries Inc.

Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Wood Processing equpment. Splitters, Processors, Conveyors

Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL

Woodland Sawmills

Margeson Insurance

Peterson Swingmills

Pacforest Supply Company

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

 Farmi Winch Direct

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: question about loading logs onto the trailer  (Read 6991 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Robert R

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 298
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
question about loading logs onto the trailer
« on: February 28, 2005, 12:32:14 am »
Hi.  I am new here.  Just sold my first load of logs last week.  The landowner set them on my trailer for me with a boom on his tractor.  That was real nice but I can't expect it all of the time.  I need ideas on how to get the logs off the ground and on the trailer.  As I am just starting, I can't justify investing in a trailer with a knuckle boom.  I am thinking a winch and ramps are the way to go, just seeking directions and ideas.  Thanks.
chaplain robert
little farm/BIG GOD

Offline KiwiCharlie

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 623
  • Age: 46
  • Location: New Zealand
  • Gender: Male
  • Theres nuthin I like more than an UGLY log.......
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2005, 12:42:30 am »
Hi Robert,
Welcome to the forum, Im sure you will get plenty of good advice here.
Your question isnt something I can answer, but theres plenty of guys here who can.  Having said that, I have used a manual winch, mounted on the front of the trailer like a boat winch, to get sawn slabs up onto a trailer.
If you eat grits youll fit right in here!  :D  And if you dont like 'em, youll fit right in here!  :D
Cheers
Charlie.
Walk tall and carry a big Stihl.

Offline Furby

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8003
  • Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • Gender: Male
  • Blurb....
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2005, 12:48:01 am »

Kirk_Allen

  • Guest
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2005, 09:23:13 am »
OK Furby, quite picking on me!

That was on oddball red oak.  We had winched it from over 300 feet in the woods.  We had more cable layed out than you can imagine.  Once we got it to the trailer we were going to load it just like all the other logs.  Roll it up the ramps with the chains under the log.  Things were going well until that stupid knot on one side caught and caused the log to shift and fall off the ramp.

We ended up dropping it to the ground and starting over.  Round two went much better!
These are pics of the boards out of that log.


Furby, here is the pic. I updated my gallery so its in the new gallery and not the old one you pulled from.


Offline rebocardo

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2972
  • Gender: Male
  • Atlanta GA
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2005, 12:04:38 pm »
I wrap a loop of tow strap around each end, join the loops in a shackle, and use a come-along or small 12v winch to roll them unto my trailer or saw mill. I usually anchor to the pintle hook of my truck for the pulling.

Offline Robert R

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 298
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2005, 05:13:18 pm »
Thanks.  Y'all have been most helpful.  From the trailer I have been using (which is borrowed) I have figured a couple things out.  First, I want a gooseneck which is no problem, I already have that hitch.  Secondly, would I rather have sides and put small logs so the load will sit up flush or do I want one completely flat so the logs will roll off easir.  I am thinking completely flat but just not sure.
chaplain robert
little farm/BIG GOD

Offline timberjack240

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 375
  • Age: 25
  • Location: pennsylvania
  • Gender: Male
  • show me a man witha timberjack ill show you a rea
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2005, 06:33:24 pm »
you could do like my pap used to wen he was young, man handle um and load them onto the truck  :D jsut kiddin but if ya want to more power to ya

Offline Furby

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8003
  • Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • Gender: Male
  • Blurb....
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2005, 07:51:07 pm »
Sorry Kirk, wasn't trying to pick on ya, just saw the pic while digging out those links! Actually been there, done that myself, just never took pics. ;)


Robert,
It's a lot easier/faster if you are able to roll logs off a trailer. Yes, you may have to get them up higher to get them on a deck over trailer, but in my mind anyways, I like the deck overs.

Offline Rockn H

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 917
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Hamburg (Milo) AR
  • Gender: Male
  • long way to go
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2005, 09:25:00 pm »
I agree with furby , I would always take a deck-over over sides any day.  It is just so much easier unloading,keep your stakes removeable so you can load and unload from either side. It seems to help too if you put some pieces of square stock of rebar every 6" or so going up your ramps.  Keeps the log rolling even instead of one end sliding up and the log getting crooked.  I didn't see the endloaders Fla. Deadheader and DanG use and I'm not computer literate enough to post them like Furby, but you can look in the picture archives to see them.  I'm in the process of putting something simular on my trailer so I can load from the end in some tight places and still be able to roll the logs off at the mill.

Offline Robert R

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 298
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2005, 11:24:50 pm »
I am starting to slowly get a picture of this in my mind.  I have about question Rebocarbo's reply.  If you wrap around both ends and then attach your winch line in the middle, how does the log roll?  Is it just being drug up the ramps?  I can see the need for a line running out towards each end of the log, under the log and then over the top and back to the winch for rolling it up without it getting away from me.  How is that accomplished?  Do I need 2 chains coming from the end of my winch line to go around each end of the log and back to attach on the trailer?  I need to get this right because prior to buying a winch, I will be experimenting with Molly and Ginger, a pair of kind-hearted and forgiving Belgian mares, to roll my logs up onto the trailer.  I'd rather not drop one when their attached--they would get a little jumpy.  I don't think they would appreciate doing the big logs, but the size I am cutting right now would be no problem for them.  They also do all of my skidding for me. 

Sorry to have such simple minded questions but I am just starting out and don't want to waste money or get myself killed in the learning process.  And truthfully, I am just looking for an opportunity to make my horse habit pay for itself.   ::)
chaplain robert
little farm/BIG GOD

Offline Rockn H

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 917
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Hamburg (Milo) AR
  • Gender: Male
  • long way to go
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2005, 11:51:06 pm »
Robert I believe what Rebocarbo is talking about would be a V chain or strap.  Hook each end of chain to side of trailer, one at front , one at back, grab in middle and pull away from trailer to form a V shape.  Roll log onto chain, run winch cable over log hook to center of chain.  My method takes some pointers from my w-m mill.  The square stock on my ramps bite into the log enough to keep it rolling and not let it slide.  On my mill I have a 1500lb man winch and have loaded several 30" 16' logs this way with no problem and very little grunt.  It does make a difference that you go over log and then back under log to trailer in order to have the cable winding in with the rotation of log.

Offline OLD_ JD

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 272
  • Age: 49
  • Location: St-anicet Queb.
  • Gender: Male
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2005, 12:24:39 am »
end the old days my dad was telling me they where digging some slopy "pit" and they where backing the truck in to it and just roll the log on ehit ramp 8)...kind of cheap way to load log
canadien forest ranger

Offline TreeSpyder

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 38
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2005, 02:47:43 pm »
Listed as a knot many times, a machine to me; is the 2:1 rolling Parbuckle for loading.  It's advantages can also be compounded by the aforementioned ramp strategy for gaining mechanical advantage.  Such was used to load heavy barrels/casks aboard ships by hand for many centuries.

i always thought that is what this Picture from Butch's collection at MasterBlasterHome.Com 's Olden Days of Lumbering Picture Album was of Parbuckle

i like it tied wide to trailer for more stability of log, also ran thru spread tow hooks etc. on pulling truck/tractor gives more stabble spread to lines than pulling from single point of a hitch or single toe ring.  It also helps if that pull positon is not tied, but slides so that it is self equalizing.  Can stack layers,and also use the Parbuckle for tying donw the load too if werked right; enough power and line strength  can use the jig for unloading as well.

Never stand in line / in the loaded axis of a tightened rope or cable.

  Sorry for the interuption; we now return you the normal image on your mental tv; with regular programming already in progress.

Offline johnjbc

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 697
  • Age: 71
  • Location: Home Carlisle, Pa - Camp Fulton County, Pa
  • Gender: Male
  • Carlisle, Pa
    • The Beaver Camp on Cumming Run
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2005, 11:06:30 am »
Each line would have a 2 x advantage. As you have 2 lines pulling that gives a 4 x advantage. If your ramps have a 45 degree slope that gives you another 2 x .  So the pull on the winch line would be 1/8 of the weight of the log 8) 8)
LT40HDG24, Case VAC, Kubota L48, Case 580B, Cat 977H, Bobcat 773

Offline Engineer

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1459
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Shaftsbury, VT
  • Gender: Male
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2005, 07:37:36 pm »
There's a few pics in somebody's album (I think it's Jeff's) that show something like a large arch or frame attached to the rear of a trailer.  You get the logs up to the back of the trailer, drop the frame onto the log you want to load, wrap a chain around the log and the frame or use grapple tongs, and raise the frame with a winch.  The concept seems like it should raise one end of the log up onto the trailer and right to the front, where you unhook it and go for another one.  Two people, one winching and one guiding, should be able to load up a full trailer of nearly any size logs with a setup like that.

Obviously it works, but I'd like to know how well - I always have a problem figuring out how to get logs on my trailer unless I bring along my tractor and forks and make at least two trips.

Offline TreeSpyder

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 38
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2005, 07:47:25 pm »
Each line would have a 2 x advantage. As you have 2 lines pulling that gives a 4 x advantage. If your ramps have a 45 degree slope that gives you another 2 x .  So the pull on the winch line would be 1/8 of the weight of the log 8) 8)

Ummmm if that is refering to Parbuckle strategy, each line powers a 2:1, there are 2 lines pulling on the log, but also truck pulls 2 lines.  So that 2 lines on load / 2 lines pulled X 2:1  = 1 X 2:1; then X Ramp advantage (ramp advantage= length/rise).

But, it is a rolling lift, not a linear, giving other advantage to Parbuckle strategy i think.


When having to lift by hand, on the larger rounds, i try to push into the side of the trailer edge, just enogh for grip, then roll the log up like the texture of the bark was gear teeth.  So i jsut meter enough forward  force to get it to bite into traile like gear tooth, savint he rest of my energy to roll, and use the leverage of that gear.  the rotational effort, being easier than a linear lift, once ya get the hang of the orchestration of events you usher.  sometimes trailer is in street, log on curb to get height, sometimes roll logg on top of 4" block of wood, to line up trailer edge to log right, to trick it up easeir.
  Sorry for the interuption; we now return you the normal image on your mental tv; with regular programming already in progress.

Offline Robert R

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 298
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2005, 08:54:03 pm »
That parbuckle design is exactly what I was thinking of doing, using a large singletree from the horses to have 2 lines running around the log and a single central line going to the winch.  Would my angles be to tight if I were using a receiver hitch mounted winch and a gooseneck trailer with a snatch block on the off side of the trailer?  Also, if the ramps run up to the edge of the trailer, for the second layer, do I need to reposition the ramps or will the winch just be able to grunt the logs over the hump created by the first deck.  I have never operated a winch and I am trying to get sorted out in my mind exactly what I need before I start spending money. 

I'd like to get 1,500 to 2,000 boardfeet on a load--can you recommend what I am going to need trailer-wise.  I will be pulling with a 3/4 dodge cummins diesel that has no problem with a 7,000 lb horse trailer and another 3,500 lbs of horses and gear.  I have had that trailer plus horses up to just over 13,000 and the truck didn't seem to mind, even in hilly country so I think I am ok as far as towing power for that size of a load.
chaplain robert
little farm/BIG GOD

Offline tnlogger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1276
  • Age: 61
  • Location: sparta tenn
  • Gender: Male
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2005, 09:25:44 pm »


I'd like to get 1,500 to 2,000 boardfeet on a load--can you recommend what I am going to need trailer-wise.
 lets see pine weighs around 5400 to 5700 lbs. to the thousand
 hardwood is more. i have a c60 chevy log truck and all i feel safe with is 1500-1700 ft
 it's not the pulling power it's the stoping that will get ya in trouble. electric brakes will fade fast under a load like you want to haul.
 my dad always told me to go light and be safe.
 as far as a trailer if you go that route get a 20ton tandem axle with hydralic brakes.
 now thats just my 2cents.
gene

Offline WH_Conley

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3675
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Camp Dix, Ky.
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to tide my profile!
    • Stone Hill Hardwoods
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2005, 09:42:58 pm »
Had a guy around here that hauled pulp with a pickup, about ten ton to the load.

Talked to him one time , he was cussin the dodge's transmission.

Talked to him again, cussin the ford's.

next was chevy.

I haul 1500 to 2000 ft on a f600 ford, thta's a plenty.

Find a log weight calculator, Timber buyers network, and figure the weight of species you are likely to haul. Personally I would think thta's too much weight. Course that's just my opinion, good luck.
Bill

Offline TreeSpyder

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 38
Re: question about loading logs onto the trailer
« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2005, 08:06:51 pm »
i'm not sure about the setup question.

But, the parbuckle rolls the spar, it can 'walk' up a ramp, not be dragged.  It can also walk over the ramping of the 1st layer.  Can even, walk up side of trailer, not a linear lift, but a rolling one.  So the weight traps spar against side of trailer, and parbuckle 2:1's the spar, but rolls it up side of trailer (when no ramps); different than 2:1 dragging up.  Not wanting to tell anyone anything to get them hurt; but we have carefully taken a 2x4 and leveraged the spar over lip of trailer helping parbuclke at it's most difficult point.

But, in stacking tiers, if you are using the same line, and it gets trapped on 1st tier (probably will); you can either reverse sides you pull spars from (line zig zags between layers)or lock the line off from the start side again(still zig/zags but not between layers), and continue. 
  Sorry for the interuption; we now return you the normal image on your mental tv; with regular programming already in progress.