The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => General Board => Topic started by: Jeff on May 27, 2002, 04:04:33 pm

Title: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on May 27, 2002, 04:04:33 pm
Do any of you notice different trees that stand out for one reason or another? Strange form, weird growths, or maybe perfect form? Just something that makes that tree stand out?  I would like to see pictures of those trees in this thread!
Here is the Tree that inspired this, I have looked at it for years, but never had the camera with me until today. I wonder if anybody else has ever noticed a nose for trees? :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/nosefortrees.jpg )
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Kevin on May 27, 2002, 04:14:28 pm
I like a cedar tree because they smell good and the boards are easy to carry.
Here`s another novel idea for you Jeff, start a tree zoo with all the different species of trees in one location.
You`ll need a high fence because some of them will be really tall.

Jeffs TREE ZOO
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on September 08, 2002, 05:28:39 pm
Ran across this site up near Crystal Falls Michigan in the far western end of The U.P.  The rock was obviously split apart as the tree grew. This tree is now dead, but a new rock splitter is growing now in the crack to the left. I stood and took in this site along the highway for a longtime.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/splitrock1.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/splitrock.jpg )


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/futuresplitrock.jpg )
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on September 08, 2002, 08:19:46 pm
That's "Split Rock", a local reference point. There use to be a sign there along the highway noting it as such. I'll be going by it tomorrow on way to Iron River.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on October 19, 2002, 06:07:38 am
There is a tree that stands in the v where U.S 27 south and U.S. 10 east come togther just north of Clare MI. Its down in a little ditch surrounded by weeds and brush. I wonder if I am the only one that has ever noticed it? I call it the burl tree. The picture I have of it does not do it justice. I will try to get a better photo, but I have to stop on the expressway and run off to get one, and the timing and traffic never seems quite right when I go by with the camera. :)

This tree has a massive trunk that seems to be made up of burl upon burl upon burl. up the trunk on the limbs. everywhere.  They were working on the highway this year and I thought for sure that the widening project would take this tree out. I was determined to get it somehow if it did, but a call to the county garage told me the tree will be staying. Probably forever. Aint it a shame that even when it dies because of its location it will never be able to be touched.

I'll just keep dreaming about the figure that must lie beneath the bark.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/burltree1.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/burltree2.jpg )



Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on October 19, 2002, 12:27:41 pm
A fresh picture. Ya know, I don't even know the species here.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/burltree4.jpg )

Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Bro. Noble on October 19, 2002, 01:06:14 pm
Some Kinda Willow?

Noble
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on October 30, 2002, 06:46:28 am
Cedar Trees In Rock. Northern White Cedar trees growing in rock near St. Ignace, Michigan,1964.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/cedar_trees_in_rock.jpg )
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: CHARLIE on November 14, 2002, 07:54:22 pm
I got this picture off the back of the May/June 1986 Fine Woodworking magazine. Following is what the caption says:
Unlike most of us, Axel Erlandson preferred to do his woodworking with live trees. for almost 40 years, Erlandson bent, grafted, split boutnd and coaxed trees into extraordinary shapes. When he died, in 1964, Erlandson's roadside tree circus near Santa Cruz, Calif., contained more than 70 specimens, a few of which are shown here. Thought many of the trees died of neglect in the decades after Erlandson's death, 28 have recently found a home in a nearby botanical garrden and park.

These pictures of the trees were from 1986, I wonder what they look like now!

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/WierdTrees01.jpg )
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on December 27, 2002, 06:42:57 pm
I took this picture Christmas Day. It is of probably my Favorite tree to look at. It is a humungous White Oak that stands alone in a field on the Weidmen Rd. in Isabella county. It just seems to be perfect, winter or summer. No matter what angle you approach from the tree has the same shape.

I wish it was outside my window so I could see it more often but then I probably would start seeing boards instead of Natural Beauty. ;)

I think this is a pretty cool Picture. :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/weidmantree.jpg )
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/weidmantreex.jpg )
I like the stylized version that Jeff
sent to me tonight better.  (Tom)

Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: beenthere on December 27, 2002, 07:17:51 pm
Jeff
You will be having nightmares if you try picturing??? boards in that tree.;D  It is a beauty tho.
Happy New Year To All
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: mapleveneer on December 28, 2002, 02:12:16 pm
The local kids worship this tree.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/malewpine.jpg )

An Eastern Male White Pine
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on December 28, 2002, 04:04:17 pm
Whats the story on this tree MV?
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: dan-l-b on December 31, 2002, 05:08:59 am
Great picture of the white oak Jeff.  There are a few trees like that in the river bottoms outside Columbia MO.  A friend of mine who died of cancer showed me the tree and we spent tme underneath her during his illness.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: johncinquo on January 27, 2003, 09:31:23 am
Lets see if I can get pic # 2 to work now.  Here is what I named a "saddle".  I am sure it has some other name, but hey I like it.  I have found several like this after I started looking for them.  This is just north of Kent City MI.(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/saddle tree optimized.jpg )
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on January 27, 2003, 12:10:55 pm
John do you have a close up of whats going on there? It looks interesting but I cant figure out what I am looking at. :)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: dan-l-b on January 27, 2003, 12:36:29 pm
Hey Jeff, found this one pretty close, is that a crows nest or what? :D :D :D(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Tree House.jpg )
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on January 27, 2003, 01:06:00 pm
How many nails do you reckon got into that tree? :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: DanG on January 27, 2003, 03:40:38 pm
Jeff, I think that might just be a young male tree, as opposed to the old male tree, posted above. ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on February 03, 2003, 04:12:52 pm
Here is North Florida's giant redwood.  It's located on US-17 on the South side of the Nassau River, north of jacksonville and is the sole creation of  cell telephone company that has run amok.

Over(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/fake tree1.jpg )
300 feet tall  with wimpy branches attached to its top, this tree is supposed to be inconspicuous sitting amongst the 75 foot pines at its base.  

I would sure hate to be a soldier that had to depend on these folks to design my camo.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on April 30, 2003, 12:41:57 pm
Grampt1 has been trying to make a picture-post forever and a day and this was going to be the great unveiling.  A good one it would have been too but optimization got in the way.  He'll make it, one day.  I know. :)

Here's Gramp's Proboscis Tree. :D
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/grampt1-oak01.jpg )


Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: hydeoutman on April 30, 2003, 12:54:47 pm
I thought this Forum was family rated ;D ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on April 30, 2003, 01:07:44 pm
Why?   Does your mind's eye see something, hydeoutman? :)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on April 30, 2003, 01:11:47 pm
Tom you might have to paint an eye and a mouth on that tree.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: hydeoutman on April 30, 2003, 05:45:26 pm
Here are some photo's of Chapel rock at Pictured Rocks National Park in Munising, MI.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/tn_Chapel rock.jpg )
That's a gorgeous Hemlock that sit's a top what is known as Chapel Rock. You can see the limbs that are just over my shoulder coming back to the main ledge. That's me in the middle, my son Jessee and brother-in-law Don

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/tn_Jess chapel rock.jpg )
This is from the underside looking up at the limbs reaching out back to the main ledge. At one time I remember seeing this limb completely covered quit a few years ago,  :( no photo's of that

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/tn_chapel rock.2.jpg.jpg )
This is the base on which the hemlock is growing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/tn_Chapel Rock entire.jpg )
The entire tree and base structure.

Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on May 03, 2003, 11:38:53 am
Gramps told me that the basket on the two-wheeled, geriatric-ATV is for adult beverages.  Nothing like a party in the woods. :)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Furby on November 01, 2003, 04:09:07 pm
I came across this picture a few weeks ago. I belive it is the same place as in  the picture hydeoutman posted, only this is from 1920 or 1921.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/1921opFF.jpg )

I'd like to hear what you all think.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on October 30, 2006, 02:06:32 pm
In the spirit off Halloween, I thought I would post a picture of this tree that I hated to pass in the dark with the quad while Bear hunting. I always thought it was about to grab me. I remember years ago when it had a sign on it, it was not near as spooky.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/bearhunt111.jpg)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: urbanlumberinc on November 10, 2006, 06:22:37 pm
This huge Siberia(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13730/lady%20in%20the%20tree.jpg)
n Elm was a good(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13730/torso%20in%20the%20tree.jpg)
 lookin tree (for all kindsa reasons)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: beenthere on November 10, 2006, 06:59:17 pm
You need a life....... ;)
Title: Re: Two Legged Tree
Post by: johncinquo on January 03, 2007, 09:31:34 am
Cant seem to get the picture to come up from my gallery.  See the saddle one I have there.  I am always intrigued when I find them like that.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Sprucegum on January 03, 2007, 11:23:29 am


  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12371/tough%20spruce%202.jpg)

I found this one on the edge of a seep/slide area. Its determined to grow, it just don't know which way to go!
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on September 02, 2008, 12:24:56 pm
White Oak Tree. This white oak tree of unusal form was found in a storm damaged timber area. It is growing out of a large rock pile. One can only imagine the hand picked rock pile created by clearing farm land now well overgrown with timber. 



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/white_oak1.JPG)

Front side of characteristic white oak tree growing in rock pile; Maturen timber harvest; 8/08



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/white_oak.JPG)

Back side of characteristic white oak tree growing in rock pile; Maturen timber harvest; 5/08

Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on September 23, 2008, 08:50:12 pm
Yellow birch Grows From Stump. The only two birch on the 80 acre area of mixed oak, red maple, and aspen are a pole size white birch and yellow birch side by side. The yellow birch grows from a remnant stump. Maturen timber harvestl 7/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/yellow_birch_in_stump.JPG)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 24, 2008, 06:23:22 am
That type of germination and growth of yellow birch is quite unique as far as temperate hardwood go. You also get them on mossy covered boulders where the roots migrate through the moss to reach the main soil base. Conditions have to be just right though so the roots don't die in the dry times. I think the roots grow quite rapidly in yellow birch.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on October 04, 2008, 04:46:10 pm
 I found this paper birch today. I have named it the The Right Angle Birch. :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/right_angle_birch_1.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/right_angle_birch_2.jpg)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Mooseherder on October 04, 2008, 04:51:23 pm
I have it's cousin lefty. ;D

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13635/Weird_Growth_Birch.JPG)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on October 04, 2008, 06:58:30 pm
Y'all need to give your trees some vitamins.  They sure are pale.  :-\   Might help that case of rickets too.  :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Mooseherder on October 04, 2008, 08:00:19 pm
Y'all need to give your trees some vitamins.  They sure are pale.  :-\   Might help that case of rickets too.  :D

Mine has Goal Post disease. ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on October 29, 2008, 10:40:03 am
Wind Shaped Red Pine. Constant exposure to the winds along the Straits of Mackinaw shapes these shoreline trees. Wilderness State Park, 9/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/wind_shaped_red_pine.JPG)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on October 29, 2008, 04:32:17 pm
Do you like them too, Ron?   I love seaside, windswept trees.  Along the Coast of the Southeast USA, Live Oak and Cedar create groves of misshapen trees, some of which look like they are permantly affixed in a gale, and others that have you looking for he spooks as the sun goes down.  I like them too.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on October 29, 2008, 05:22:28 pm
I've notice the red cedar, lodgepole pine and western hemlock along BC's NW coast as well, the ones along the shore line and lowland. It's funny though. I tend to look at a tree most times for it timber value.  :D And some of those were just ugly, but part of the landscape none-the-less. I guess you could think of them as the front row crop that allows the trees a bit further in to grow better timber.  Sometimes you can go a long way in and still have crappy timber, depending on what it's growing on. ;D Those wind swept trees have inspired a good bunch of art though.  ;)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on October 30, 2008, 08:20:37 pm
Yes, they add unique character and diversity to the shoreline landscape.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on March 18, 2009, 10:30:18 pm
This tree here is on the way to my sister Lynda's house.  For some reason, when ever I see it, it reminds me of some sort of musical instrument. It has very few branches on its east and west sides, but branched out huge north and south. If you view it from the south, it looks rather flat.

I dont know if it reminds me of a harp, or what, it just seems musical in my mind.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/2/music_tree_1.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/2/music_tree_2.jpg)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: pigman on March 18, 2009, 10:41:46 pm
It's looks like a harp tree to me. We don't have them down here, but we do have quite a few fiddle trees.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Chico on March 19, 2009, 06:16:33 am
Looks like one of them Lyres or whatever the Jewish folks use in their services to me or maybe a music holder like my daughter had on her clarinet ;D
Chico
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 19, 2009, 06:42:31 am
Or an elaborate candelabra or Jewish menorah. ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: ErikC on March 19, 2009, 12:35:12 pm
  I have a big live oak right by my driveway that reminds me of that. It is pretty wide, but kind of flat. It is one of my favorite trees on the place.
Title: Think I Found a Moon Tree
Post by: g_man on April 27, 2011, 05:21:38 pm
I have this funny fir tree.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21065/MoonTree1FF.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21065/MoonTree2FF.JPG)

My wife thinks I'm being childish. She is usually right. But thought some of you might get a chuckle like I did.

gg
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Brad_bb on April 27, 2011, 06:41:09 pm
Looks like you've got some junk in the trunk!   :D :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Sprucegum on April 27, 2011, 06:43:18 pm
 :D  :D The longer you can be childish the longer it takes to get old  ;)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: nas on April 27, 2011, 06:45:59 pm
 :D :D And your wife is so mature she didn't laugh at all. >:(
P.S.  My wife thought it was hilarious :D :D

Nick
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Mooseherder on April 27, 2011, 06:58:26 pm
That is a Million dollar tree on Ebay. :)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: isawlogs on April 27, 2011, 07:24:24 pm

 :D :D :D   :-X   :-X.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Magicman on April 27, 2011, 10:03:53 pm
I may be childish also, but I did get a chuckle out of that tree butt.   :D :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Coon on April 28, 2011, 01:15:53 am
I think that tree was a plumber in it's previous life.   :D 
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Burlkraft on April 28, 2011, 07:26:20 am
I think that tree was a plumber in it's previous life.   :D 

 :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: isawlogs on April 28, 2011, 08:45:25 pm

 I was going to saye that I have a sister in law that resembles that somewhat but guess I best just keep that to myself  shouldn't I now.  ;D :D :-X
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: WDH on April 28, 2011, 08:49:31 pm
My wife said that it looked like a butt!
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: woodsy on April 28, 2011, 08:58:51 pm
My wife said, now that cracks me up  :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on July 08, 2011, 11:46:44 am
In a tiny corner of western Poland a forest of about 400 pine trees grow with a 90 degree bend at the base of their trunks - all bent northward. Surrounded by a larger forest of straight growing pine trees this collection of curved trees, or “Crooked Forest,” is a mystery.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/poland_s_crooked_trees.jpg)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on July 08, 2011, 02:02:22 pm
 :D  No mystery to me.  That is crop circle stuff.  :D :D

I'll bet someone ran over the whole bunch of them when they were a bit past the seedling stage and they were broken at the base.  :-\
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Sprucegum on July 08, 2011, 04:56:54 pm
 :) Where else would a Cossack park his saddle?

If they are all facing North; what time was the picture taken?  ???
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ianab on July 08, 2011, 05:06:11 pm
I've seen one or 2 trees like that, when a sapling has been knocked over then curves up to grow "straight" again.

But never seen a whole forest of them....

Freak wind storm laid them all over when they were only 3 or 4 ft tall?

Ian
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Tom on July 08, 2011, 05:08:56 pm
Sprucegum
If you are looking at the shadows, you have to understand that the sun is down here in Florida and Poland is way up north on the other side of the ocean.  So that means that the sun is a long ways south of Poland and that Florida is in the direction of the left side of the photo.  North is to the right.  :P

Now, if Poland had a sun, then  North would still be to the right 'cause that is the way the trees are facing.  :-\

The picture had to have been taken late in their afternoon or the sun wouln't be up in Florida yet.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 08, 2011, 06:23:26 pm
I've see a whole field of red pine get broken down by ice when they were only 3 feet tall. Probably 25 acres.

Also, aspen damage from snow load, when the snow melts out and slumps from a huge drift it breaks down the stems. I've had them look like those tree buts in a couple sections. Not as much sweep though.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Sprucegum on July 08, 2011, 06:50:30 pm
 :D Being Northwest of most Poles myself; I figured it was about 4:00 in the afternoon.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Coon on July 08, 2011, 08:04:28 pm
There are crooked trees northwest of Saskatoon, Sask. too.  The crooked trees here are a bit different than those ones however but are still crooked nonetheless.   :D  Take a look at this website and you'll see what I mean.  

http://www.pbase.com/sjvucko/crooked

I wonder how many board feet worth of nice straight lumber there is in this grove?   :D  Not even 50 feet away from this grove the trees are straight as an arrow.  ???
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: WDH on July 09, 2011, 12:21:57 am
Has to be ancient tree art.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Coon on July 09, 2011, 03:56:20 am
These crooked trees I posted have been growing there for many years naturally.  The oldtimers have said the trees were there like this when they were young and were actually about the same size then as they are now. ???
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 09, 2011, 05:48:27 am
Too much chokecherry wine, the source of alien urine. ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Troublermaker on July 10, 2011, 06:24:49 pm
Coon
My old boss use to say that a circular saw would strighen any log but I don't think he was talking about any thing like that.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Coon on July 11, 2011, 02:25:43 pm
 :D  Coulda been the chokecherries but then it coulda also been that dandelion wine too.  ;) 

About the only thing that could straighten those logs out would be a chainsaw cutting them into shorter pieces for the campfire.   :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: cutterboy on July 17, 2011, 04:55:17 pm
Hi everybody. 

I have a few trees in my woods that are unusual. Yesterday I took pictures of a couple of them. The first is a white birch that at some time must have been uprooted and blown over but it kept right on growing, curving back up as it did. As you can see a crack has opened up in the base and through the bend. That crack is more than two inches wide in some places.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11157/DSC00514_opt.jpg)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11157/DSC00516_opt.jpg)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11157/DSC00520_opt.jpg)


The other tree is a red oak that has a big ugly slanted base, but then turns into a straight tall and beautiful tree.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11157/DSC00521_opt.jpg)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11157/DSC00522_opt_opt.jpg)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11157/DSC00526_opt.jpg)


I don't know what happened to the oak to make it grow like that, but I wonder if the base of it would have interesting grain patterns if I sawed it on my mill.

  Ralph
Title: Weird, odd or at least strange looking trees
Post by: Banjo picker on July 29, 2011, 08:14:01 pm
When you see a tree that don't fit the norm, put a picture of it here...These first two are in a park in the small town of Paden Mississipi...

This is a willow oak grabbing hold of a larger cedar

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18028/willow_oak___cedar_2.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18028/willow_oak___cedar_1.jpg)

This is a red oak that has self grafted itself back together above the fork, but has not completedly grown together yet.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18028/self_grafted_red_oak_4.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18028/self_grafted_red_oak_3.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18028/self_grafted_red_oak_2.jpg)

you got a view from both sides  of the tree...I wonder how many people walk right be it and never notice it...Tim
Title: Re: Weird, odd or at least strange looking trees
Post by: Jeff on July 29, 2011, 09:34:14 pm
 :)

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,22997.0.html
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: clww on July 29, 2011, 09:46:37 pm
I've got two trees I'm going to get pictures of this year during hunting season. Both are oak burls near the bottom portion on each tree. The larger one is at least 24 inches across! This is twice as big as the tree diameter. Really freaky looking. :o
Title: Re: Weird, odd or at least strange looking trees
Post by: clww on July 29, 2011, 09:48:05 pm
Thought you'd be getting ready for the Pig Roast, Jeff?
I fly down to Key West Tuesday morning.
Title: Re: Weird, odd or at least strange looking trees
Post by: Jeff on July 29, 2011, 09:51:31 pm
Working on different things to get ready everyday.  :)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on July 29, 2011, 10:18:56 pm
Here is a tree I thought I posted in here. Burlkraft and I have each had our photos taken with it. It stands about 100 yards into the woods behind my friend Lou's pole barn.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/2400/DSC07919.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/2400/DSC07922.JPG)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Roxie on July 30, 2011, 08:02:07 am
I'm about to show my ignorance in tree identification, but what kind of tree is that?   :-[
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 30, 2011, 08:14:14 am
I think it's a black spruce Roxie, but Jeff can verify.

Here's another. ;D

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/wooly-spruce.jpg)

Looks like it's growing fur on the bottom half.  Cold you know. ;)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on July 30, 2011, 08:51:59 am
That is was it is. A Black Spruce.  I didn't get photo's of the roots, but even those were burled up and pushing out of the ground.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Norm on July 30, 2011, 09:34:47 am
I'm amazed it was still there after Burlcraft saw it.  :D
Title: Out on a Limb
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 30, 2011, 10:14:08 am
"Out on a Limb"

From: Ryerson Review of Journalism written by Bruce Tisdale (1999)

Every so often even the best writers become too enchanted with a story. They are captivated, and perhaps a wish not to disturb the tale causes them to overlook any faults that might be found by less involved observers.

In his book, Company of Adventurers, Peter C. Newman is at times a very enchanted writer. The book is the story of the Hudson's Bay Company and its crucial place in Canadian history. While the work is extensively researched, one prominent anecdote reveals a shining example of enchantment leading to error.

Newman presents the tale in the first page of his foreword. Two men were hiking in northern Saskatchewan far from any other human contact. One night as the pair were preparing their camp they noticed something glinting high in a spruce tree. One climbed the tree and brought down, "a weathered copper frying pan with the letters HBC still clearly stamped on the green patina of its handle. The two men had their dinner and sat around the campfire, cradling and examining the intriguing object, asking themselves why anyone in his right mind would have hung it 40 feet up a black spruce.

"In one of those moments of heightened sensitivity that sometimes telegraph the flash of understanding, the truth dawned on them simultaneously. They broke into smiles that collapsed into belly-pumping laughter. Of course. The frying pan, much like the one they had just used to make their meal, must have been hung on a sapling by some long-gone Hudson's Bay Company trader. It had inadvertently been left behind the next morning, and the little spruce quietly continued growing-and growing."

Anyone with any knowledge of trees might already see a problem. Unfortunately Newman didn't and continued to promote the story, which he saw as a "graphic reminder of how deeply the Hudson's Bay Company is woven into the memories and dreams of most Canadians."

Last Nov. 4 Newman again related the anecdote-this time on CBC Radio's Morningside. Listeners wrote in to point out that the frying pan could not have reached its position in the tree simply through the tree's growth.

One wrote that "spruce trees, in common with all other trees, grow from the top. A frying pan or anything else for that matter, attached to a branch five feet above the ground 200 years ago would still be five feet above the ground today no matter how high the tree had grown in the meantime." Another used examples to illustrate the point: "Old tap holes in maple trees don't migrate skywards. Old telegraph transformers along logging roads stay at transformer height. The tree house that you built as a kid probably seems lower now, not higher."

Tree experts agree with the letter writers. As Philip Brennan, management forester for York Region of the Ministry of Natural Resources explains, "The way a spruce tree grows is by extending new shoots from buds on the old branches. By late summer, the new shoots have formed their own buds, so they can't extend anymore. The shoots can't extend, so the frying pan can't move." Brennan says the possibility of the frying pan's transference from shoot to shoot would be "a small miracle if it happened once," but this method couldn't possible carry a frying pan 40 feet up a tree.

At the University of Toronto a similar tall tree story is told in second-year forestry classes. "We use it as a fallacy that people hear," says Dr. T.J. Blake, associate professor of forestry. "It's an old wives' tale that's been spread around."

Somewhere in northern Saskatchewan stands a black spruce that was almost a legend.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: WDH on July 30, 2011, 07:38:40 pm
A porcupine did it  :).
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Magicman on July 30, 2011, 07:50:02 pm
Nope, Mikey did it.   :)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Banjo picker on July 31, 2011, 07:49:24 am
When a speaker or writer uses something like that I find I just about stop my thought travel with them untill I can check ot if its urban ledgen or not....Sometimes the illustration gets so good you can't rember what the main thing they were talking about even was....A wolf licking a frozen piece of bloody meat with a knife blade in the middle comes to mind....No proof it happened....I checked that out as soon as I got home, but don't rember why it told it....The skillet in the tree....thats good... :D :D  Tim
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Coon on July 31, 2011, 07:34:22 pm
Gosh Darn it, that's where I hid it in my former life.   :D  I couldn't remember where I had put it up and outta da way from dem dam baars.   ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 01, 2011, 05:43:11 am
From the Author of the book mentioned above:

"When the HBC papers, now lodged in the Provincial archives of Manitoba, had been valued for insurance purposes before being transfers from London to Winnipeg in 1974, they weighed in at sixty-eight tons- not counting the old muskets, sextants and other paraphernalia that pushed the weigh even higher..........

One exhilarating moment for me was reading the journal entry by James Isham of York Factory in the 1730's in which he complains how the swarms of mosquitoes 'have visited the plague of Egypt upon us'-and then finding a mosquito carcass, bloated with English blood, squashed right onto the page."

 :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Banjo picker on December 05, 2014, 08:22:47 pm
Lets pull this one back up to the top.  Its been three years since its been active,  and there are a lot of new folks on here..  Here is one I saw while horseback riding somewhere, I can't recall which place now. 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18028/self_graft.jpg)    Evidently it saw the need to self graft.  Banjo
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 05, 2014, 10:53:07 pm
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF0199.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF0201.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF0200.JPG)
They do that sometimes :D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Magicman on December 06, 2014, 07:19:34 am
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0647.JPG)
A White Oak.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0651.JPG)
A Post Oak.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Banjo picker on December 06, 2014, 07:55:30 am
Peter do you know what kind of tree that is?  Glad they weren't cut down when the building was built.  Yours was a white oak wasn't it Lynn? 
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: BEEMERS on December 06, 2014, 12:35:21 pm
Hey Jeff...that very first tree in this post...is it on old US-27 down by camp rotary on the east side of the road?
Also remember that tree we found on my property the one that had an obvious?......well you know what..you should come get a pic of that and post it..I remember where it was and I also know of a few trees that would be awesome in this post...get with me.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on December 06, 2014, 01:00:22 pm
Yup! That is the tree.  8)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 06, 2014, 07:41:29 pm
Peter do you know what kind of tree that is?  Glad they weren't cut down when the building was built.  Yours was a white oak wasn't it Lynn? 




Maple
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Magicman on December 06, 2014, 10:13:43 pm
The top one is a White Oak.  The bottom one is a Post Oak, which is in the White Oak family.  Those trees live two doors down from me.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 07, 2014, 04:24:49 am
Another common thing to see up here since we have big rocks, lots of moss on them at times and yellow birch. Yellow birch will germinate in the moss on a rock sometimes and the roots migrate down around the rock. Lots of times on old stumps that rot out to. The tree is on stilt roots. ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Banjo picker on November 25, 2015, 06:49:31 pm
Here is a new tree with a nose.   

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18028/20151125_131737.jpg)   Banjo
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Klunker on November 27, 2015, 10:36:30 am
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37657/125.JPG)

found this confused tree while trout fishing a few years ago. caught my eye.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Kbeitz on November 28, 2015, 08:14:05 am
I found this in Dominican Republic. I wanted to bring it home for my back yard.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Large_tree_1.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Large_tree_2.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Dee_2.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Big_roots.JPG)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Magicman on November 28, 2015, 08:11:41 pm
You never know what may be watching you.   :o
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0415.JPG)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 29, 2015, 10:18:59 am
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18975/Photo0431.jpg)

At Kejimkujik National Park in Nova Scotia
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Ron Scott on January 19, 2017, 02:52:30 pm
"Twelve Trees You Won't Believe Actually Exist"

http://gowood.blogspot.com/2017/01/twelve-trees-you-wont-believe-actually.html

cdr

Charles D. Ray, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Wood and Forest Science
The Pennsylvania State University
Room 205 FRB
University Park, PA  16802
Office: 814-865-0679
Fax: 814-863-7193
Email: cdr14@psu.edu
On the Web: http://extension.psu.edu/woodpro, http://gowood.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Magicman on January 19, 2017, 03:12:06 pm
We will have to get Jeff to post the Sycamore picture that he took at my place this week.   ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on January 19, 2017, 03:44:44 pm
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20170115_090649.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1484858668)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 19, 2017, 04:53:43 pm
I find the bark of sycamore to be one of the most interesting tree barks. Aside from the fact a lot of barks on trees change a lot with age, especially extreme age.  ;D
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Jeff on January 19, 2017, 05:02:08 pm
I looked at that tree and knew it was one of God's works of art.
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 19, 2017, 05:13:14 pm
The different color of the bark: from the older stuff still holding fast on the trunk, to the exfoliated parts revealing inner bark, to what must almost be cambium green, really makes it stand out and demand a good look when you come across it on a stroll in the bush or roadside or yard.  ;)
Title: Re: A nose for trees
Post by: Kbeitz on January 19, 2017, 06:33:28 pm
That was a good video...