The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Forest Education => Topic started by: sprucebunny on July 23, 2004, 09:03:04 am

Title: emerald ash borer
Post by: sprucebunny on July 23, 2004, 09:03:04 am
Do these bugs eat trees besides ash ? There aren't any ash trees around here but I just caught another beautiful bug wandering around in the dirt. The trees all look eaten and half dead but i figure that's drought last year and gypsy catipillars this year.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ed on July 27, 2004, 09:57:51 am
This might help you out.
Ed

http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-exec-outreach-eabposter.pdf
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: sprucebunny on July 27, 2004, 06:46:39 pm
Thanks Ed.I put the bug in a film can. I'll compare it to the pictures tomorrow.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: sprucebunny on July 28, 2004, 06:21:12 pm
False Alarm!!! It was the other pretty green bug.What a relief, I think. What does a "six spotted tiger beetle" eat?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Paschale on September 01, 2004, 10:15:34 pm
I was at the bookstore recently and one of the woodworking mags had on the front cover the headline:  "Kiss Your Ash Goodbye."  I suppose they were trying to be funny, but I think it's in poor taste.  They shouldn't be flip or joke about one of the greatest tragedies to befall our forests since the Dutch Elm's disease tragedy.  My dad lives less than a mile from a big sign posted on M-99 in Michigan declaring a "No Ash Transport" zone which sure makes this tragedy hit closer to home.  The only response appropriate towards the demise of ash trees is sorrow.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on September 02, 2004, 05:18:15 pm
I agree. It's a real shame to be losing the ash trees.

They are surveying the entire state for its potential spread and have traps set out to help determine the bore's presence.

Emerald Ash Bore Trap. Located along State  Highway 55 west in Wexford County. We are currently preparing a selectively marked hardwood thinning in the area. 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/emeral_ash_bore_trap1.jpg )


Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 02, 2004, 05:53:09 pm
Information to take note of by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency

inspection.gc.ca (http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/plaveg/protect/pestrava/ashfre/agrplae.shtml)
A number of links there concerning the emerald ash borer, including regulations, compensation, news releases, publications, current survey updates, 'infected places order' maps.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: dewwood on September 05, 2004, 12:01:39 pm
In answer to the original question, my future DIL was on one of the survey teams this summer scouting for the ash borer.  She said that in its native habitat the ash borer does not choose ash as its natural host, one theory put forth here is that since many ash trees were already weakened by the ash decline they chose them as a host in this area.  My question to that is "Does that mean they may possibly spread to other species when the ash are gone?"  Her answer was that is what they are very concerned about.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 05, 2004, 12:47:47 pm
Known Hosts:

A variety of hardwood trees serve as hosts. Fraxinus americana (White ash), F. chinensis (Chinese ash),  F. japonica (Japanese ash),  F. lanuginosa (Chinese flowering ash), F. mandshurica (Manchurian ash),  F. nigra (Black ash), F. pennsylvanica (red or green ash), Juglans mandshurica (Manchurian walnut), Pterocarya rhoifolia (Japanese wingnut), Ulmus davidiana (Japanese elm), U. propinqua (Chinese cork bark elm).

Info from CFIA - here , plus its biology (http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/sci/surv/data/agrplae.shtml)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on September 10, 2004, 07:21:35 pm
Michigan Department of Agriculture reports that the Emerald Ash Bore (EAB) control effort has set out 2,561 traps. The traps are set with Saran Wrap and Tanglefoot (made in Grand Rapids). Trees are labeled to keep them from being disturbed. They will later be evaluated for the presence of EAB, then removed and destroyed.

Website: www.emeraldashborer.org
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on October 21, 2004, 11:56:50 am
Just a notice to all with interest in Indiana, whether it be living there, or shipping ash logs/lumber there.  The Indiana quarantine has changed.  A full copy can be viewed at http://www.in.gov/dnr/entomolo/pdfs/EABLagrangeSteuben04.pdf

Basically, it looks like the state has quarantine the state of Michigan, and any entry of ash materials into Indiana from Michigan will need documentation assering it is pest free.  Just another bump in the road...
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: AtLast on November 28, 2004, 03:00:12 pm
What most dont realize is that this " pest" has been around for at least 10 years and unknowen to anyone the movement of the infested wood has gone on. I hate to be the bareer of bad tidings BUT as far as Michigan is concerned..its a done deal...the WORST fear was that this material make its way accross the Big Mac...well..it did....now the worry is ...will it move west....as Im sure most of you know its appearance in other states is evident and continues to do so due to the lack of information and awarness....the worst fear is that because of the time frame that this material has moved further than expected....foreign trade has impacted our woods and forests and continues to do so....if we dont nip this in the butt soon and better regulate incoming dunnage...well...lets just say...have you ever seen the movie " Soylent Green"
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on November 28, 2004, 05:57:15 pm
I heard the other day from an inside source that one of the traps yielded and EAB south of the Tower/Onaway area in a stand of black ash along the Black River. :( :'( >:( :o :( :'( ::)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: sprucebunny on November 29, 2004, 04:28:37 am
I was reading last summers(2004) Timber Crier from the NH Timberland Owners Assn and it says that EAB was also found in Ohio and Maryland in 2003.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Pedalbiker on November 29, 2004, 01:25:53 pm
Last week the local newspaper reported that an ash borer was located in a trap in Warren township in Midland county.  Unfortunetly, thats the township I live in.   :-[   This is located in the central part of the state.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on December 02, 2004, 12:46:56 pm
AtLast - you are correct that EAB symptoms were found in the UP on wood transported there from the quarantined area.  However, there has not been a confirmed positive in the UP, meaning that there is no standing ash that has been found in the UP with EAB.  

As for Cheboygan county, unfortunately, that is a confirmed site.  

Just wanted to clear things up.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Paschale on December 03, 2004, 07:31:17 pm
Heard about this on the radio today, and found an article at the Detroit Free Press:


December 3, 2004, 4:55 PM


LANSING, Mich. (AP) -- Larvae of emerald ash borers, which have been killing the state's ash trees, have been found in central and northern Michigan, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Agriculture said Friday.

The early signs of the ash pest were found in trees damaged by state agriculture crews in Cheboygan, Oscoda and Midland counties to determine whether the ash pest is in those parts of Michigan, spokeswoman Sara Linsmeier-Wurfel said.

Earlier this year, state crews removed a layer of bark on thousands of ash trees across the state to stress them because they better attract the borer and help agriculture officials determine how far it has spread across the state.

Since their discovery in 2002, the ash borer has killed millions of ash trees in 13 counties in Lower Michigan. To control its spread, the state has made it illegal to move ash trees, branches, lumber or firewood unless they are chipped to one inch. The quarantine has been extended to isolated areas of six other Michigan counties.

The state is sending a crew to Oscoda, Midland and Cheboygan counties to determine whether they have an infestation of the emerald ash borer, Linsmeier-Wurfel said.

"While we found them in tree traps, it doesn't necessarily mean the area is infested," she said.

Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on December 04, 2004, 08:55:28 pm
 :( :'( :( :'( >:( :'( :( :'(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 05, 2004, 04:08:19 am
I hope that bug doesn't come here because I have alot of white ash seedlings I'm trying to manage for on my woodlot.  :-/
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on December 15, 2004, 06:15:56 pm
Michigan Takes Law Enforcement Action!

http://www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125--106594--,00.html
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: sprucebunny on December 15, 2004, 06:36:03 pm
I think the fines should have been ALOT MORE   :-/
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on December 16, 2004, 05:42:40 am
I agree, especially when warnings have been and are constantly posted.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Paschale on December 17, 2004, 08:02:34 pm
Man!  This burns you up!  

"In Gratiot County, OGW Tree Service and Trucking was found guilty and ordered to pay the state $8,680 in fines, court costs and restitution as well as serve 90 days in jail should the fees fail to be paid in a timely manner. The company was also found guilty in Luce County and fined $200."

That low of a fine is a crime!  Makes ya really mad...especially when those yahoos probably made money cutting that stuff up for firewood, illegally, and they probably made more money than the fine was.  So they're still ahead, so it's not much of a penalty or deterrent.

ARGH!
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on December 22, 2004, 12:32:39 pm
It has noe been found in Oceana County.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6736942/
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on December 22, 2004, 09:27:58 pm
Oh great! With the the dunes there, go figure! ::)
I guess I better take a walk in the spring.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on December 29, 2004, 08:14:50 am
The Emerald Ash Borer quarantine was extended Monday by the Michigan Department of Agriculture to include 7 new counties and outliers in several areas.  The seven new counties are: Hillsdale, Branch, Calhoun, Eaton, Clinton, Gratiot, and Saginaw.  For more info visit the MDA website at www.michigan.gov/mda and click on the emerald ash borer link.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on January 31, 2005, 09:23:10 pm
I attended the 'EAB Info & Ash Wood Utilization Fair' this weekend at Washtenaw County Fairgrounds - interesting show.  The good news was that everyone seemed very interested in finding a use for the ash that has or will need to come down.  Everyone seemed very impressed by the Baker mill demonstrated by Last Chance Logs to Lumber.  Bad news is that the general consensus is that the bug is going to be pretty hard to stop. :'(

The most up to date map I saw showed outbreaks outside of the quaratine area all over the lower penninsula, in NE Indiana and in Ontario.

http://www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125-2961_6860_30046---,00.html

The other interesting comments where the limited amount of interest in the State bidding process by tree services.  From what I heard there are 28 services signed up for 20 counties in the quarintine area.  Everyone wants to stop the bug, lots of people lined up to use the wood, but limited interest in getting it down and hauling it at the state rates.  Maybe they should offer a tax break for woodlot owners w/ash and tree services.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on February 03, 2005, 10:19:04 am
I saw on the local news this morning that the EAB has been found on Old Mission Penisula in Grand Traverse Co and it appears that it has been there for several years.  It's now been found in parts of most of Northern Michigan.  It keeps getting worse :( >:( :'( ::) >:( >:( :(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Paschale on February 03, 2005, 03:23:45 pm
Does anyone know the deal with harvesting/processing standing ash?  It seems to me that one way to beat the DanG bug is to cut down any and all viable ash trees, and turn it into lumber, instead of just letting it be turned into mulch, as I've heard is happening with much of it.  I suppose right now there's a flood of ash on the market, but I'd rather see a flood now, since undoubtedly, we're going to be experiencing a long term dearth in the near future!   :-[
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on February 04, 2005, 09:44:01 am
From what I understand this is exactly the way they are handling the outbreaks away from the quarintine counties - removal of healthy ash around the outbreak.  I think the concern is that if the harvesting and movement of timber is not done properly then it will actually promote the spread of the bug.

The official agencies have been very good in getting the news out about the bug to the general public and alot of thought is going into promoting the use of the wood besides landfill.  But there does not seem to be concerted effort to let the small business forest industry know how to handle infected or soon to be infected trees.  It would seem that forums like this and the small to mid level forest industry could really help in preventing the spread. 

For instance, I have asked several officials regarding the rules for using ash wood from infected areas outside of these areas and can't seam to get a straight answer.  Training is required but I cannot determine through what channels.  Official inspection is required but I have not been able to find a standard set of rules.   :'( :'( :'(

An official 'rulebook'  on processing (particularly bark) would be very helpful.  For instance - is it best to fell, cant the log on site, grind the bark and leave at the location?  Is it ok to move timber (with bark on) within the quaritine area even though you may risk infected trees that haven't seen the critter yet??  How far into the tree needs to be removed to have a 'safe' cant???
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on February 04, 2005, 04:57:16 pm
I've been asking the same questions. Was told today that the wood needs to go directly to the mill within the quarintine area. Lacatiion that it came from and location that its going to must be recorded and it can't stop in route.

At the mill, the outside 3 inches then needs to be slabed off and chipped and burned. The center cant outside the bore area is the usable wood.

Its a good idea to attend one of the Michigan Dept. of Ag. sessions in your area of infection though for best current information.

We now have it in the Marilla area of Manistee County also.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Sawing Logz on February 04, 2005, 06:58:22 pm
I have to say there is alot of talk and miss informed information about EAB going to both extremes. The logz should be kept in the county there removed(felled in) in my opinion, and the tree services in those counties should be notified that an alternative for the waste ash has been around since portable sawmill came to be. Acording to the classes I have attended and the Michigan forrester I have been in constant contact with,  1" bellow the bark was the required removal for meeting the states requirements. The rest of the wood with no bark inclusion was aceptable.

Jeff
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on February 04, 2005, 07:47:25 pm
In my opinion moving ash around in counties that are entirely infected and quarantined is OK but in a county such Cheboygan that so far has only one area of infestation I sure as H*** don't want anyone moving any logs or firewood from there to anywhere else in this county or any other county in the area >:( >:(.  That's how this bug spreads.  In areas up here in Northern Mi I'd like to see all ash processed at the infected location rather than risk spreading this pest through the transportation of logs etc.  Even chipping to 1" pieces or less before transport worries me.  Chips blow out of chip vans all the time ::).  It seems to me they should be processed to smaller than an inch to make sure the bugs are indeed killed.  Moving cants that have been sawn to specs would be fine but anything to do with the outer portions of the tree needs to handled in a very serious manner.  Most of the outbreaks up here are the result of firewood or nursery stock being brought in from downstate >:( so lets not spread it around locally.  I've got some pretty nice ash trees here that I'm not ready to cut and some good ash regeneration that I'd rather not have to destroy but my optimism about this situation is running out >:( :( :'( >:( >:( >:( >:(  I've got this bug both east and west of me now and I'm beginning to feel time is getting short and not enough has or is being done.  I remember when elm was a major part of our forest now even most of the stumps have rotted away and we've got one remaining living elm in 100 acres of woods.  I'm beginning to believe that the ash is going in that same direction :'( :(.   
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Sawing Logz on February 05, 2005, 08:44:27 pm
Corley, I do agree with your thoughts on movment, but those little 1' chips have been seen with the bug still on them. So buy not moving them and sawing them at that spot there could be less chance of them chips fliing out of them big dumps and into other none infessed areas. Plus for the guys wanting to due business in ther own backyard(county) ther is a winfall.

Jeff
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on February 05, 2005, 08:59:54 pm
What is involved in getting started doing this?
I'm guessing it's connected to the state right?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Shotgun on February 05, 2005, 09:20:39 pm
Here's a lot of EAB info. It's also reachable from the above mentioned URL.

http://www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125-1568_2390_18298---,00.html

More direct EAB program info is here.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on February 05, 2005, 09:31:49 pm
Exactly Jeff.  If the outside 3" of the tree or any other part where the bug lives is going to be transported it needs to be ground into dust!  I'm all for utilizing as much of these possibly infected and postively infected trees as we can but lets not jeopardize our uninfected areas by moving anything through them that could in anyway cause an infection.  I firmly believe that if the MDNR, MDA and all the gov't agencies both state and federal involved in this would have dealt with this issue more aggressively when it first came to light we wouldn't be in this situation to the point we are now.  There was an unforgivable lack of action in the early stages of this situation especially when it came to public eduaction about the EAB.  One example in particular was the photo copied warnings on state forest campground info boards up here warning people about importing ash firewood from infected areas.  By the time the people read this they already had the wood here ::) ::) >:(.  Very little was done to educate and inform the public in the areas first affected until it was largely too late and it had been unknowingly spread to other parts of the country.  The general public can't be blamed for the failures of our public service agencies to keep them adequately educated and informed on matters such as this.  It hasn't been until recently that there has been fairly good info out there aimed at the general public.  O.K. I'll get my soapbox now but this whole thing really p*$$#$ me off >:( >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on February 05, 2005, 09:35:55 pm
I'll second that Greg!
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on February 06, 2005, 07:59:02 am
Not sure that there is still a chance to prevent the spread, but the current info on the site refered to by Shotgun is lacking alot of detail.  The contractor instructions on this link especially:

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/Roles_of_Contractor_114449_7.pdf

- It says to chip debris but no size is listed.
- Does MCC Rep have to present?
- All wood to go to closest marshalling yard - even if cut into cant on site?

Training and restrictions are definitely necessary but the current system seems so restrictive yet without detailed instructions.  Incentives for tree contractors need to built into the system to make this thing work - not extra costs at lower income.  It's not hard to figure out why there is a lack of interest in the current system.

How about a 'bounty' on ash trees in a buffer zone around the quarantine area?  Get'em down to stop the spread.  Maybe a grass roots lobby of state government is in order.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on February 06, 2005, 07:19:45 pm
It's just  moving too fast now, from my understanding. If info had been a little more forthcoming at the start, most of this probly would have been very effective.
I'm thinking now, in order to stop this, not only would we have to have check points 24/7 on all roads leading out of a quarantined area, but we must move the boundries out and start removal of ash trees a couple of states away and work towards the quarantined areas.
Not the best idea, but things are spreading too fast to do things the way they are now.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on February 07, 2005, 03:23:23 pm
Furby, I really think that the lack of forth coming information is irrelevant.  Its like tracking a deer. You are looking at things that occurred in the past, but only gaining the knowledge as you find each track or hair.  Truth is, the deer passed through the day before, and there is nothing you can do to stop that.

Those infested areas that are cropping up now were probably infested before we knew there was a problem ANY where. :-\

Let us hope the things we are doing now will hopefully slow the spread so perhaps science can catch up.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on February 07, 2005, 03:30:33 pm
I hope someone's working on a new variety of ash that doesn't appeal to the EAB's taste ::) ;) that can be used in the future to restore ash to our forests.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on February 07, 2005, 03:57:12 pm
Thank you Jeff for your deer analogy. It is a very good illustration of what has happened.

For those of you who haven't noticed, the majority of my posts occur in this particular folder of the Forum.  That is because I work as  PPQ Officer for the USDA's side of the Emerald Ash Borer project.  Many of the questions that have been raised in the last several posts have been relevant questions which deserve answers.  Unfortunately it would take me ages to answer each one here, especially since a lot of the answer depends on where the wood is, where it is going, and how it will be processed wither before or after shipment.  As it is my job to regulate the Emerald Ash Borer and any product that may potentially spread it, I feel a duty to answer these questions.  Feel free to ask specific questions here, or through personal messages to me through this forum.  Believe me, I understand your frustration when it comes to these questions, and I will do everything I can to attempt to clear the muddy waters, at least a little.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on February 07, 2005, 09:11:42 pm
While you are right to a point Jeff, I feel it's the still the same now. 95% of the people I have talked to outside of forum members and the like, know nothing about the EAB. The few that know anything, only know the 5 second blurb that they saw on the news, and really still know nothing. I don't feel there is yet enough info being put out there.

I do agree with the the new outbreaks being infested a long time back, but that's the point. Why do we allow movement of Ash in areas NOT under quarantine? We don't know where all the infested areas are and are possibly spreading it. We need to step back for a bigger picture, then move back in for the kill.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Shotgun on February 07, 2005, 09:28:27 pm
Furby,

I think you might be suffering from some unreasonable expectations concerning dealing with a pest of this nature. There are many limitations  that confront the program you may not be aware of.  I suggest that you use the EAB hotline (866-325-0023) or the e-mail contact point at http://www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125-1568_2390_18298-87549--,00.html.  Ask your questions there.  Also there's lots of info on the Michigan and U.S. Departments of Agriculture, and the MSU sites. Since you have questions, I suggest that you contact the proper agencies and get them answered.

Norm
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on February 07, 2005, 09:57:37 pm
Furby, this is a good place to input some ideas if you think you have some that could be effective.

This is a tough row ta hoe for everyone. Furby, yer giving mankind way to much credit though, the job of controling nature is one thing that I still think the good Lord keeps out of our hands and for good reason.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Paschale on February 07, 2005, 10:07:05 pm
I hope someone's working on a new variety of ash that doesn't appeal to the EAB's taste ::) ;) that can be used in the future to restore ash to our forests.

What I've heard, is that roughly 1% of ash trees for some reason don't attract the pest, or somehow the trees are immune to it.  The hope is that future forests could be generated from this gene pool.  I believe I've heard the same thing regarding the beech trees that are dying in Canada and the U.P., that 1% of native trees are immune.  Has anyone else heard this, or is it just a rumor?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on February 07, 2005, 11:27:31 pm
This is a tough row ta hoe for everyone. Furby, yer giving mankind way to much credit though, the job of controling nature is one thing that I still think the good Lord keeps out of our hands and for good reason.

EXACTLY!
I have NO faith in mankind anymore, and I'm not talking about controling nature. I highly doubt "nature" brought this bug to the states. Maybe it did, but I doubt it. And I highly doubt that "nature" spread it to the UP, but maybe. As you said else where, the straights of mackinaw are a perfect barrier.
It is mankind that we should be controlling. We could at the very least slow things. As it is, there is no reason for a quarantine, at least not in it's present locations. We don't know where all the infested areas are, yet we allow transportation of Ash in and out of areas that may be infested and are not under quarantine.


Shotgun,
I mean no disrespect by this, as I truly value your opions, but we are talking about the possible loss of up to 1 BILLION ash trees in the state of Michigan alone. My having "unreasonable expectations" that the state and federal agencies could have and still should be doing more, sounds like a joke to you? I understand things are being done, I'm not saying they are not. I belive more could be done to educate the public as they ARE, THE major means for the spread of this thing! The couple of seconds air time on SOME news channels, the once in a while artical in the paper, the websites that are slowly popping up, are not doing it fast enough. The state published brocures with a small amount of info, and sent them to places for poeple to "find" IF those people even knew about the EAB problem. Couldn't they send one to each mailbox instead?
We live in an era of instant communication, yet we can't find a way to get the word out about a major problem?
The state of the state address would be one possibility to get the word out to the few people who will be watching, but there are other ways as well. Why are there not commercials running during all the popular shows?


What we are doing now is mostly cleaning up in the wake, and buying time hoping man can come up with a chemical to stop the bug, why? We could have, and still can stop being responsible for widespread distribution of this bug. It won't stop it, but it sure as heck won't spread as fast!
If this were a deadly human virus..............we'd all be dead!
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on February 09, 2005, 07:51:58 am
The ash trees in China, which is where the bug came from, seem to have resistance to it, as they are only effected by the bug during stress of somekind (drought, etc.).  There are people looking at breeding new ash varieties with these trees, the problem is they are not very atractive and have none of the characteristics we like about our ash here, so it would take a very long time to achieve.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: pasbuild on February 20, 2005, 08:28:00 pm
Who is saying that the EAB is in the Upper Peninsula, is it a state agency, is it the federal  government , if this is in fact true then I agree with Furby and not enough is being done to inform the people >:(
I have talked to loggers,foresters and log buyers from Newberry to Wakefield and nobody has heard anything about it.  DANG its not that hard to inform those in the forest products industry, provide informational handouts to all of the local saw shops, It doesn't  take that many fingers to count the companies that buy hardwood logs in the UP, make it mandatory to hand out an informational sheet with each load slip. I'm sure that these timber professionals would be more then happy to remove the standing ash while it still has a marketable value instead of waiting until all its good for is a big puff of smoke going up in the air. :(
I for one am keeping a close eye on this as I want to turn our ash into a usable  product when and if the time comes  however there ether is no info available or you get conflicting info for our area :-\ :-\
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on February 23, 2005, 08:22:33 am
There is currently no confirmed oubreak of EAB in the UP.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on February 23, 2005, 07:41:59 pm
Yep, I admit I was off on that one as I can't back it up.
Looked online last night and none of the sites are showing it.
Today I tried to get ahold of one of the fellows I talked to that told me they had found them up there, but he is out of town right now.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: AtLast on February 26, 2005, 10:01:02 am
In accordence with a complience agreement you must saw 1/2" below zylum cambium.  logs can be moved INTO quaran. area but not out. The chip size is SUPPOSED to be 1" or less but as we can see the grindings DO NOT meet this yet were still allowed to be shipped. Though LCLTL's involvement we are able to show a positive alternative in the handling of the logs. My yard is part of a regular tour that the MRCD puts together the MDNR, MDA MSU Extension along with a wide varity of people have been on this tour including Steve Bratkovich and Patricia Lockwood. I have showen them that by utilizing this material and the small abount of watse generated would potentially save the State millions of dollers. Because basically top flitches are the " waste" and can be run through our Dynamic cone head chipper which DOES produce 1" or smaller chips. These chips can than be used for foot paths through the trials in parks within the QZ.  Also with the many state parks and state vehicles that this wood could be used for would ALSO save the State tons of money. LCLTL has kept over 500,000 b/f of material out of landfill or from being burnt and saved municipalities we contract with big savings on not only their disposal cost but material costs as well. From picnic table replacement boards, park benches, bleechers, trailer ecking, banger boards on trucks fence posts and railings and have cut wood to spec for a play structure. LCLTL have been involved in this right from the get go and  have always preached utilization not only for the Ash but all urban material. I commend Urban Logger on the FANTASTIC job his group and others like him are doing. Setting an example that happily is picking up steam. Our company jackts proudly display the Forestry Fourm logo on the sleeve and Im asked about  this forum.  Im pretty that MSU got to this site via the logo  8)...As far as the UP goes...."confirmed"?....not sure BUT I DO know for a fact that it HAS crossed the bridge.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on February 26, 2005, 10:10:11 am
Quote
Im pretty that MSU got to this site via the logo 

Nice thought but I have been involved with some of the Michigan State Extension Foresters for many years.  Michigan State extention Foresters have been answering "Ask the Forester" questions for our Timber Buyers Network website and the MFRA site since around the turn of the century. :)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: AtLast on February 26, 2005, 10:21:54 am
I ment MSU_ Keith.....no matter....glad we are all trying to do something positive. 8)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: pasbuild on February 26, 2005, 10:29:49 am
Atlast
You write (As far as the UP goes...."confirmed"?....not sure BUT I DO know for a fact that it HAS crossed the bridge.)
Tell me more, what do you know that none of the loggers up here know :(
Do you know if the state is monitoring the UP and if so were?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on February 26, 2005, 05:00:08 pm
Good question. A statement like that deserves to be backed up with facts and statistics.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: AtLast on February 26, 2005, 11:16:55 pm
In order for LCLTL to ship lumber ( Ash) outside we have to have it inspected by the USFS who than tags and bands the material. Upon a visit from the USFS inspector he told of the tree service locally here that shipped 4 truck loads of firewood to his property in the UP. They , the USFS, tracked and fined this company for this breach of policy. The way it was told to me was that indeed these truck loads of firewood made its way accross the bridge to the UP. As I stated. NOT CONFIRMED but by hearing this first hand from the USFS that indeed this material was in the UP was scary enuf. I dont know what it is that youre looking for other than what I stated. as far as facts and " statistics" go..as I stated. NOT CONFIRMED but indeed a fact, all I was trying to do was pass information. I dont understand why I am feeling persicuted for simply telling what I was told by the USFS that tracked this material to the UP I was not saying an " outbreak" was in tow NOR did I say it was epidemic like in the lower part of Mich. all I was doing was passing information.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: pasbuild on February 27, 2005, 12:44:40 am
Thanks for the info Atlast, sorry if I made it sound like I was grillin ya, just after any info on EAB in the UP.
Do you know if the camp in question was in the Newberry area?
I heard a rumor that sounds like it may have STARTED from the incident that your referring to, Did the USFS inspector go into detail? If so could you share that with us.
Again Thanks for the info.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on February 27, 2005, 01:11:53 am
My info or lack of, ::) was within the Newberry area and was firewood, but I don't yet know about the rest of the story.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on February 27, 2005, 08:34:24 am
I'm not persecuting, I am playing the devils advocate. Asking for substantiation of "facts" is prudent on an issue like this. You cant Yell fire because you see smoke coming out the slightly opened teenager's bedroom window. This is very important to those guys in the U.P. and "rumors" can cause bad stuff to happen to woodlots and landowners.

"HEY!  You gotta cut this right now! The EAB has crossed the bridge and your timber will soon be dead!!  It will be worthless if you DON'T SELL IT NOW!"

Don't think that kind of crap don't happen. What you have reported here on the EAB in the U.P at this point is "hear-say". Not fact until it is substantiated with fact.  Now, saying that, I think its a fair bet that firewood has crossed the bridge, at least I would be willing to bet on it. Problem is, thats just one guy's opinion and everybody has got one.

  I can absolutely understand pasbuild's interest and concern. Lots and lots of people are reading this forum and looking here for information on this very thing.  I think any information that comes forth on such an important issue should be timely and absolutely accurate.

Certainly AtLast, in the position you are in you need, no, make that have to be ready to answer this type of question and not feel "persecuted". You are out there on the forefront of an extreme crisis for our forests. Information from you needs to be absolutely un-reproachable.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on February 27, 2005, 09:23:07 am
Michigan Takes Law Enforcement Action!

http://www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125--106594--,00.html
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on February 27, 2005, 09:35:25 am
Now there is a fact! Thanks Ron.
 There ya go Chris, now you have a source to point to that dead and dieing ash was moved to the U.P., but it should be read in its entirety.  The most relevant portion to this particular discussion:

One case Wyant noted in particular was that of OGW Tree Service and Trucking of Southfield. The company began working with a community in Oakland County in 2003 removing dead and dying ash trees from that area. Despite numerous trips to the state’s no-cost disposal sites and awareness of the EAB quarantine, the company illegally moved ash wood out of the quarantined area to properties in Gratiot and Luce counties.

“The Department’s investigation showed that the company is directly responsible for the introduction and infestation of Emerald Ash Borer into Gratiot County. Thankfully, Luce County was spared from a similar fate as we have found no evidence of EAB infestation there to date,” Wyant said. “Sadly, Michigan citizens and ash resources end up paying the ultimate price for this type of disregard for the law.”



 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ed on March 02, 2005, 12:22:53 pm
It's sad that the fines & punishment were so light.
It ammounts to no more than a slap on the hand.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on March 02, 2005, 02:23:24 pm
Unfortunatley Ed the State of Michigan has a highly outdated Plant Pest Act, and so has to prosecute under those ancient laws.  Hopefully they will update the thing and make the penalties much stiffer.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: tnlogger on March 02, 2005, 03:00:11 pm
I'm not persecuting, I am playing the devils advocate. Asking for substantiation of "facts" is prudent on an issue like this. You cant Yell fire because you see smoke coming out the slightly opened teenager's bedroom window. This is very important to those guys in the U.P. and "rumors" can cause bad stuff to happen to woodlots and landowners.

"HEY!  You gotta cut this right now! The EAB has crossed the bridge and your timber will soon be dead!!  It will be worthless if you DON'T SELL IT NOW!"

Don't think that kind of crap don't happen. What you have reported here on the EAB in the U.P at this point is "hear-say". Not fact until it is substantiated with fact.  Now, saying that, I think its a fair bet that firewood has crossed the bridge, at least I would be willing to bet on it. Problem is, thats just one guy's opinion and everybody has got one.

  I can absolutely understand pasbuild's interest and concern. Lots and lots of people are reading this forum and looking here for information on this very thing.  I think any information that comes forth on such an important issue should be timely and absolutely accurate.

Certainly AtLast, in the position you are in you need, no, make that have to be ready to answer this type of question and not feel "persecuted". You are out there on the forefront of an extreme crisis for our forests. Information from you needs to be absolutely un-reproachable.
your right in that jeff  when the pine beatle thing stated down here a few yrs back quite a few unscrupulous loggers went around looking at pine trees when they saw some brown  neddles on some trees they would tell the landowner they better cut them fast or they would have to burn them
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: AtLast on March 02, 2005, 05:23:25 pm
So I guess the concensious is lets let the other shoe drop before we do something about letting it hit the ground???...My statement brought awareness...and it made those concerned take a " better look" at whats goin on. facts..statistics...wont hold a candle when push comes to shove and all is to late to act...this is exactally why it, the EAB has gotten to this degree.... and I HOPE Ron posted his post in order to substantiate my...." hear say"...but the bottom line remains the same...In this case all to often being " to late" has taken its toll...so...ask yourself...should facts and stats completely hold the bar on action...OR...should " claims made by those that are.....reliable....fortuitive...concerned...just plain scared...sit back and not take a position that allows others to make their own decisions...information via the MDA and  MDNR  is readly available on the web...yet it poses not euf of what ALL....ALL need to look at...IF youre a wood lot owner....and IF a buyer poses this claim and IF the woodlot buyer is quick to " jump " at abuck..than I say to them....you should have done your research.....at the same time I say....by being one that IS aware and able to pass information...fact or not...it allows those concerned to deduct a decision and make their own choices accordingly...Thank you Ron Scott for posting...and thank you for substantiating my....rumor....but again I say...the end result remains the same.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on March 02, 2005, 05:52:43 pm


Thankfully, Luce County was spared from a similar fate as we have found no evidence of EAB infestation there to date,” Wyant said. “Sadly, Michigan citizens and ash resources end up paying the ultimate price for this type of disregard for the law.”


You implied that the EAB is in the u.p. 

Quote
...As far as the UP goes...."confirmed"?....not sure BUT I DO know for a fact that it HAS crossed the bridge.

You should be accurate and complete in your information. Especially in the position you are in. 

The facts are that dead and dieing ash was taken to the u.p. by a company that was also responsible for the introduction and infestation of Emerald Ash Borer into Gratiot County.  It does not state that there is any EAB in the U.P.

My Personal opinion: I think it is probably inevitable that EAB will ultimatly surface in the U.P.  However, until there is no prove that it has, and there is not at this point, one should not be insinuating it has, especially one granted with supplying the public with information.




Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 02, 2005, 07:44:00 pm
tn_Logger and Jeff,

The same thing happened with the spruce budworm years here in the 70's and 80's. Some loggers where scaring landowners with the potential scorge of the spruce budworm. Although, I will say that in alot of the cases they were true threats to the trees. Even big industry was in a panic in those years. I can remember them spraying in the 70's and under the spruce trees I would find dozens of grackle birds killed by the poisen. I can remember this when I was only 5 or 6 years old. I think it's been about 12 years since they sprayed for budworm here.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on March 02, 2005, 07:52:48 pm
I think every effort should be made to get out the information in a prompt and responsible manner and I am absoluety sure it has. When ever there is an outbreak in a new place, it has been reported. The quarantine areas are expanded as the threats are identified.  I refuse to believe that someone may be hiding or delaying information that EAB is or is not in a certain area.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on March 03, 2005, 02:10:01 pm
Let's try to clear up the UP situation.  Yes, the company that is responsible for spreading EAB to Gratiot county had trucked up ash to Luce county.  The wood was removed and MDA did a survey of the area to determine if EAB was in that area.  During thier search they found very little ash in the area, and those that they did find showed no EAB symptoms.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on March 03, 2005, 02:47:34 pm
Thanks estiers! 

estiers and I had a great talk this morning. Very cool to have her as a member.

I have offered the forum up, (although it has always been available), as a place to post and to get, the most recent and up-to-date information possible on the EAB.  I will start another thread, that will be a "sticky"  It will always be at the top of the Education board where it can easily be found.  The first post will contain a PDF map of the current Tri-State Quarantine map from the USDA.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: pasbuild on March 03, 2005, 09:37:34 pm
This thread  is not to bash anybody or any organization  it is to obtain any and all info available on the EAB, Atlast you gave me what I was looking for, ANY INFO. We all no that the wheels of government don't turn very fast and I for one don't want to wait for the official report if I can get it before hand.
Thanks to Ron Scott, estiers, Jeff and Atlast I can go back to those that are embellishing the Luce county rumor and correct  the miss information.
As Jeff stated this false rumor in the wrong hands can be as devastating as the EAB itself.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: AtLast on March 04, 2005, 07:11:17 pm
It is because of " my position" that I am quite comfortable in "stating" that inded it has.." Crossed the bridge"...this was my statement...NOT  that it was flurishing about...NOT that it was spreding...NOT that there was and " outbreak"....this by any standard was NOT an " insinuation"...it was information recieved from my contact with the USFS/MDA and as substantiated by Ron Scott and  the Luce County incident that this, my statement, was not irresponsable not rumor nor an insinuation...I stand by all my statements and can only hope that, once agin, those concerned, be it a woodlot or landowner be privy to and be able to do their research and make an informed decision...(Now there is a fact! Thanks Ron.
There ya go Chris, now you have a source to point to that dead and dieing ash was moved to the U.P., but it should be read in its entirety.  The most relevant portion to this particular discussion)....Jeff...in its entirety once again I say....the bottom line remains the same.....
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on March 04, 2005, 07:54:35 pm
I would read post 70 again

The official word is:
During their search they found very little ash in the area, and those that they did find showed no EAB symptoms.

"Substantiated by Ron Scott"   :D  Ron didnt substantiate anything, he pointed us to a webpage that stated that  nothing was found in Luce county to indicate EAB activity.

I did want to add, this, as I believe it has been construed that I think a rumor is "an untruth", not so, I always try to pick my words to the best of my ability, and feel that rumor was an appropriatte word in this instance.

Definitions of rumor on the Web:

An unverified belief that is in general circulation. (11)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on March 05, 2005, 09:03:55 am
Yes, I only posted information made public on the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) web page. The same information has also been in local newspapers.

MDA has been trying to keep the public informed on EAB and on law enforcement action that has been taken for violating the EAB quarantine.  :P 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on March 07, 2005, 10:56:06 am
AtLast:

Does the USFS inspection and tagging process cost anything? If yes, is it a one time fee, per visit or by the bdft?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ken Bell on March 08, 2005, 06:48:44 am
Last year, in Ontario chunks of ash, from the "Ash Free Zone" were shipped east, across Chatham Kent. Some of these where whole branches and long bark shreds.


You can see the photos at ash.info.ms (http://ash.info.ms)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on March 08, 2005, 07:51:50 am
Ken - Homeowners in Michigan are not always given a choice (a statement made on your website).  In "outlier" areas (i.e. outside of the main infestation in 20 counties in SE Michigan), the state can and does come in and cut "healthy" trees down.  The website you reference does express alternative methods, but these methods are expensive, and not always effective. 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: hawby on March 08, 2005, 10:27:37 am
To add a little to this discussion... Two weeks a go, a rep from Dept. of Ag (Michigan) stopped by by place. He provided some materials that explained what EAB is and what steps are being taken to stop it. I had kust encountered a dead ash in our woods, so I had him take a look at it. It was not EAB, however, he told me that EAB senses the distressed trees and that is why they (Dept of AG) has been girdling trees in "healthy" counties. This draws any EAB in the area and allows for an "early detection" of EAB./
/
They are hopping that this phenomenon will lead to a trap design that may slow the progress of EAB.
//
Our county (Barry) is on the edge of the quaratine area and I believe by end of Summer, we'll probably be added. For my part, I would like to identify all of the ash in the area and clear it out as a firebreak./
/
hawby
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on March 08, 2005, 11:01:13 am
The link given by Ken Bell has links to other sites that seam to contradict each other regarding pesticide effectiveness:

One says it is effective:
http://ash.info.ms/
Not sure how 'official' this link is.

Another says only marginally effective under specific conditions:
http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/bulletin.pdf

Estiers: Any current data on pesticide studies or has this route been abandoned?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on March 08, 2005, 02:32:15 pm
The 2004 data on pesticides has not been released as far as I know, and those results might shed more light on the situation.  However, anyone who has used pesticides will tell you that they are not 100% effective.  They are variable depending on the temperature, rainfall, soil type, etc.  So, it depends on your mission.  There are treatments that are effective (over 80%), but the mission of the CFIA, USDA, MDA, ODA, and INDNR is not to be "effective."  It is to stop the pest from moving into other areas.  That is why you see the "drastic" measures being used. 

I can say that in the fight against EAB, 76% mortality from BotaniGard (quoted on ash.info.ms) would not be effective in areas that are infested by EAB.  One female can lay up to 250 eggs.  76% is 190, leaving 60 adults (30 pairs) to emerge and mate.  In the second generation you then have 30*250, or 7500 adults.  76% is 5700, leaving 1800 adults alive to mate.  In the third generation you then have 900*250, or 225000 adults.  76% is 171000, leaving 54000 adults alive to mate.  As you can see, in a program who's goal is to stop the spread and hopefully eradicate the pest, even 85% control is not enough.

To keep up on the most recent EAB research findings, look in on  the www.emeraldashborer.info every once in awhile to see if the new research has been added. 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on March 08, 2005, 06:50:24 pm
In the latest issue of the Michigan Farm Bureau News there is an article on research currently being done on parasitic wasps that seem to be natural enemies of the EAB.  The wasps were found in a study plot in Livonia and are of the genus Balcha which feed on the EAB larva and the genus Pediobius which attacks EAB eggs.  It is suspected that at least one of these wasps was unknown to science to until now.  Precisely identifying the wasps will take time as there are 215 known species of Pediobius worldwide with 32 of them in known to exist in the U.S.  Exact identies need to be nailed down if they are going to be any assistance in controlling the EAB.  The scientists involved in this research have also been to S. Korea, Japan, and Mongolia seeking other natural enemies of the EAB.  We can always hope :) :(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on March 13, 2005, 06:12:10 pm
Here's a link to an article in this weekends paper.  Before reading it remember how you voted on the eminent domain poll  ;).

http://www.freep.com/features/living/ash12e_20050312.htm

I think the ground is as frozen now as it has been all winter so I am not sure what the problem is.  The article doesn't really list tree size but I imagine this would come into play if he is planning to do the work himself.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: farmerdoug on March 13, 2005, 11:04:16 pm
In my area the ash population is high.  If they where to cut all of the ash in our section it would be a clearcut in certain chunks of up to 15 acres.  If I hear they are coming here I will have all of the ash here cut and piled for firewood and they can buy it if they want it.  Even with heating all of my greenhouses there is several years worth of firewood and I am sure not going to let them grind it up and haul it away for nothing.  Eminent Domain mains they are to atleast pay a token for it if nothing else in my opinion anyways.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Tom on April 14, 2005, 02:00:48 pm
At the risk of diluting the input here, I think that the best way to combat environmental diseases, especially those that are imported, is to make every one aware of the problem.  It's education, awareness and all of us accepting the responsibilities for the fight that will let us win these battles, and maybe the war.

A neighbor site, run by Steve Nix, has a thread started on EAB. While I don't recognize it as the same thread I saw a couple of days ago, it still represents a place where the population can get good information.  It also has members who aren't afraid to stand up against bad forestry practices, advertisements for miracle cures and the initiation of erroneous information.

If you decide to visit there, don't be surprised to find some of your buddies from here over there. :D  Please remember who you represent  :)

The Forestry Forum, here, is still my home, but, this is a place I visit:

http://forums.about.com/ab-forestry/messages/?msg=4103.1

 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on May 13, 2005, 10:38:35 am
Tuesday, Chet and I took a drive over to Midland county where my dad was born and raised and 3 generations of Brokaws before him.  We went over to take a walk on the property and look at different tree species. We found this on the farm, directly across from the old house. (there is a lot of ash on the river flats there)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/eab_sign1.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/eab_sign2.jpg)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2005, 10:51:48 am
You have a EAB trap and detection tree on your property, so you should be one of the first to know if your area becomes infected.  :P
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Chet on May 14, 2005, 08:01:17 pm
It would be a real shame if the property did become infected as there are many very nice ash.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2005, 11:39:04 pm
Yes, it looks that way. They usually select one of the "poorer" trees for a trap/detection tree and that one they used looks pretty good.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 15, 2005, 06:28:15 am
 ;D ;D I consider all my ash to be perfect, but of course they aren't. ;D :D Now if someone could invent a cheap portable 'moose swatter' to keep'm from scraping their antlers on the bark.  :-\  >:(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on May 15, 2005, 08:45:06 pm
An interesting change in the quarentine area - the old practice for when the county road commission trims and cuts back the trees in the right of way was to chip the crowns on the spot and leave the bigger chunks in the ditch for the firewood scavengers.  Now they add a step - whenever they cut an ash they staple a firewood movement warning all over the logs. I guess every little bit helps.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Dana on May 29, 2005, 08:13:14 am
The MDA put a trap tree on our property also. We are located in Charlevoix County and the beetle has been found on the otherside of the county. (about 15 miles away) The state is taking the trap tree issue seriously in our area judging from the fact that the traps are about a mile and a half apart on the road ways here.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: populus on May 29, 2005, 10:38:05 am
A question for those of you living in the EAB zones:  Are there any beetles out yet?  You don't usually see the adults (they fly high in the canopy) but you will see fresh D-shaped exit wholes.  Is MDA or anyone else reporting emergence dates?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on June 08, 2005, 01:45:25 pm
For any of you interested in helping spread the word, and who would be willing to put a bumper magnet on thier vehicles, please visit www.emeraldashborer.info to get a free bumper magnet just like the one under my name.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on June 28, 2005, 08:06:01 am
I recently made reservations to go camping in a Canadian Provincial Park.  During the transaction, the gentleman asked for my address, and then asked me to confirm my location (I live in Ypsilanti, MI - right in the heart of the EAB quarantine).  He then proceded to say: "It looks like you live in an Emerald Ash Borer quarantined county.  Please do not bring firewood with you when you come to Canada."  As you can imagine, I was thrilled by this.

Have any of the rest of you had this type of communication, either with a reservation for a Canadian Park, or a Michigan State Park?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on June 28, 2005, 09:45:44 am
No, but I am having more and more instances where people would like me to look at a dead ash tree. One just this past weekend in Oceola county. (No sign of EAB that I could see, the tree was dead and the bark was falling off, and full of ants, but zero tell-tale EAB signs) Awareness seems to be going up.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on June 28, 2005, 10:32:07 am
 smiley_clapping
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on July 01, 2005, 02:55:59 pm
Here to wish everyone a great 4th of July weekend, and to remind you:

 DON'T MOVE FIREWOOD
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on August 07, 2005, 09:03:43 pm
Emerald Ash Bore. These large white ash trees are dying from the emerald ash bore. Note that it is now quite obvious in the crown of the tree on the left but not so obvious yet in the tree on the right.

Trees are located in southern Michigan near the northeastern Indiana border; 8/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/emerald_ash_bore.JPG)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on August 07, 2005, 10:56:24 pm
 :( :'(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Chet on August 07, 2005, 11:15:02 pm
While traveling north to da UP from da Piggy Roast I was pleased to see that there were finally firewood transport signs and a firewood check station at da bridge.  8)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Furby on August 07, 2005, 11:57:29 pm
Yup, was filled in on that at the roast.
I guess there is a dump site on the South side and a voluntary check point after you cross, with plenty of signs.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on August 08, 2005, 11:26:00 am
On our way home from the P. R. we passed a truck north of Grayling that had a load of ash firewood pulling a boat headed north.  I'm sure that at least two of the pieces were ash.  We made a call to 911 and they were more than happy to pass the truck and trailer plate #s on to the State Police.  We're not sure if they got them or not but they wouldn't have made it across the bridge anyway
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: pasbuild on August 09, 2005, 05:25:57 am
Good for ya Corley, thanks for doing your part smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Emrldashbr on September 08, 2005, 11:23:14 am
  I sure would like to see a lot more interest by people like you.  It is very sad to see how much firewood is being hauled around.  Unless we watch the main roads full time it is impossible to keep a handle on it.  We are trying to explain to the State Parks that all hardwood, non-coniferous firewood is prohibited from leaving a quarantined area.  But for the most part all they tell campers is they can't bring ash to the parks.  Most people don't know what ash is or looks like.  The employees at the State Parks do some form of firewood inspection but it could be easier if they got the message correct up front, before the wood gets there.  I don't know if the Police are passing along firewood transport calls but I know that the Michigan Department of Agriculture follows up on all of the calls it gets.  When we do follow up on these types of calls we have to rely on what the individuals tell us as to the origin and destination of firewood.  A confession is the only way to verify a quarantine violation.  In addition to Firewood inspection points at rest areas, moving firewood blitz activity occurs where Regulatory personnel look into vehicles and take license info for later contact, and work with the State Police Motor Carrier Division helps us by pulling over vehicles so the inspector can seize quarantined violating wood on the spot.
  The increase in fines and penalties for quarantine violations (effective Sept. 1, 2005), are a reflection of the concern our State has in regards to this and future insect pests.
  Thanks for keeping your eyes out and trying to pass along the info!
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on September 11, 2005, 09:55:19 pm
We noticed last weekend that the beech trees around our camp in Da UP  east of Munising are infected with scale.  I knew it was in the Eastern UP but was unaware that it was headed west until I talked to forester friend last week.  From what he told me we are on the "advancing front" of the scale and in a couple years the nectria will begin causing the trees to break off etc.  It really is too bad and too late to stop it.  Hopefully the EAB can be contained.  What gets me about the whole thing is once again there has been almost no public education on beech scale.  There are no checks at the Bridge to keep beech firewood etc from entering the Lower Penisula ::)  It's just a matter of time before someone brings some beech firewood home for the fireplace or a camper brings their extra wood from the UP to a campground down here and we've got another outbreak.  Our beech tree's days are numbered.  Better start planting European beech but the EAB probably likes them ::) ;)  I read something at the Logging Congress about some sort of a wasp from Europe and North Africa that has been found in NY that can cause up to 80% mortality in pines :o ::) :( >:(  We're not gonna have any trees left
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 14, 2005, 07:16:22 am
The maturity of our tolerant hardwood covertype is sugar maple, beech, yellow birch. A small minority of folks are keeping an eye out for unblemished beech in severely infected stands. These are left. Since beech isn't found often in pure stands the diseased beech can be removed without being detrimental to the stand. Historically, the whole stand would be cut for pulpwood or firewood. Then there are always the folks that believe the smoother and straighter the tree, the better the firewood.  That's true in some ways I suppose.  ::)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Dana on September 15, 2005, 08:32:29 am
Has anyone else noticed a lot of die back in the tops of the ash tree's? I see it a lot here in Charlevoix County and hope it dosen't always mean infestation.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: BCCrouch on September 24, 2005, 08:18:22 am
Surprise!  They're infected.  The trees die back from the top and usually sprout suckers from their base log as the tree attempts to stay alive.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on September 24, 2005, 09:36:16 am
BCCrouch, I do believe there are other maladies that can cause the same thing in ash trees. Seems like you would need to examine the trees to make the EB diagnosis acurate.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 24, 2005, 04:53:53 pm
I've seen the same symptoms here, but the cause was someone moving earth around the base of the tree. ;)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: BCCrouch on September 25, 2005, 08:12:42 am
On a specific site, sure.  Mechanical disturbance, ash yellows, etc. can cause mortality here and there, but living in SE Michigan and seeing the ashes fading fast is enough to cure you of any optimisim unless an aggressive parasite or pathogen is discovered that'll take out the EAB.  I'm just old enough to remember the American elm street trees being cut down in Detroit and it's happenning all over again with our Fraxinus friends.

I've also seen the firewood going north and a good number of people from Bloomfield Hills, Birmingham, Troy, and the other upscale areas own second homes in NW Michigan.  I'm not a gambling man, but if I were I'd give you 10 to 1 odds that the large scale ("a lot here in Charlevoix County") decline of ash is the work of the EAB.  I'd be delighted to be proven wrong, but that's not likely to happen.

If you have an ash in your yard as a shade tree, Dana, start treating it now or just cut it down and replant with something else.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Dana on October 13, 2005, 10:12:25 am
On the news this morning, they reported that they had caught a guy who was trying to cross the Mackinaw Bridge with firewood. It seems he saw the check point signs warning not to bring the wood over the bridge.  Pulls into a gas station and  removes the wood from the trailer and puts it in the motorhome. Someone apparantly saw this and let the ag. guys know. Looks like he may get the 10,000 dollar fine. 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on October 13, 2005, 10:39:52 am
I have someone that dropped in that wants to come and cut up some of my pine slab wood for camp wood. He said they are going bird hunting in the U.P.  I told him you can't move firewood across the bridge, even if its pine as far as I know. He said, "I don't care!"  Well, I am going to let him get some if he wants. I am then going to call the state police with his name and license.   I suppose I should refuse him the wood, but if I do, he will just get it somewhere else and I wont have the chance to report him.

I don't want to do this. The guy is a neighbor from about a block away. He is a decent guy. BUT, the I don't care statement has told me a lot about how this is spreading.  This fellow knows full well about the ban, and apparently has made a decision to ignore it. When you make stupid choices, you should suffer the consequences.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on October 13, 2005, 10:59:52 am
What really gets me about this whole firewood thing is the last time I was in the UP there were lots of tree and firewood was easy to come by.  Why haul haul it there in the 1st place?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on October 13, 2005, 11:18:22 am
Corley, there are always people that like to defy. And when someone interferes with their freedom of movement, the more determined they are. ;)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on October 13, 2005, 11:56:24 am
I have decided if this fellow comes for the wood, he wil have a stern talking to. I am going to tell him again why he cant take wood to the U.P., and depending on his attitude towards that, I will go on to tell him that I plan on reporting him because I have to. I have no choice.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on October 13, 2005, 01:34:01 pm
I would think that that would stop him. especially if he has heard about the latest violation caught crossing the bridge. smiley_policeman
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on October 13, 2005, 02:41:41 pm
The quarantine regulates hardwoods firewood.  So he can legally cross with pine.

Just given ya the regs. :P
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on October 13, 2005, 04:58:34 pm
Ok!  I'll let him know that and wont have to report him. That means I can give him a good lecture and still get rid of my wood! Thanks Erin. :)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on October 14, 2005, 10:54:24 am
That's me job!
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on October 18, 2005, 11:31:37 pm
So when are we going to hear some results of the trap tree survey?  The trees around here cut and chipped some time ago.  There must be preliminary findings.  Is the public going to be let in on it in timely matter or is it going to be some deep dark secret that's kept as long as possible? 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on October 19, 2005, 03:56:55 pm
As far as I know they are still in the removal process.  I haven't heard any results yet.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on October 19, 2005, 08:19:00 pm
Let us know some results as soon as you can  Thanks :) :)
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Dana on October 26, 2005, 08:44:14 pm
Update on the guy who hid the ash firewood in his motor home to cross the Mackinaw Bridge. On the news this morning they reported he got a thousand dollar fine. Lucky him it could have been 10,000 dollars.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on October 26, 2005, 10:24:55 pm
I think this is one case they should have made an example out of. The guy KNEW what he was doing and intentionally tried to hide the wood.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Tom on October 26, 2005, 11:36:00 pm



A thousand dollars would make me sit at home for awhile.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jeff on October 27, 2005, 01:04:50 pm
I dont think he should have been sitting at home. I think he should have been sitting in jail.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: pasbuild on October 27, 2005, 09:02:05 pm
I'm with ya 100% Jeff
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: jtmccallum on November 16, 2005, 08:28:16 pm
So when are we going to hear some results of the trap tree survey?  The trees around here cut and chipped some time ago.  There must be preliminary findings.  Is the public going to be let in on it in timely matter or is it going to be some deep dark secret that's kept as long as possible? 

Last year the trees around here were cut and chipped. (Midland County)   This year we had one by our house,  I wondered if they missed it.  Just noticed today they stripped the bark off and cut it down.  Saw another tree cut the same way when I drove over to our farm to go hunting today.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Emrldashbr on December 22, 2005, 12:19:15 pm
FYI
  When looking at the MDA/EAB website www.michigan.gov/eab be careful that what you are looking at is for you.  In a post waaaaay back in this thread someone mentions the FAQ for contractors.  That is in regards to the State Sponsored Ash Removal Contracts (ARC).  The EAB ARC is a contract between the State and pre-approved contractors to remove trees for Homeowners (ONLY through the Municipal Coordinator!) and the Municipality.  Under this contract a community within the EAB quarantined counties can access the State contract and the contract has set price limits for the removal of Ash Trees.
  The contract limits pricing on ash trees only, living/dead/healthy/infested ash trees.  Only the contractors working under this contract are obligated to honor those prices, and only when the contract is accessed by the community's acting Municipal Coordinator.  The community decides if they will participate according to need and interest of the residents.  Trees are inventoried and measured.  Pricing is according to tree size and location (back yard trees are considered harder and cost more).  The purpose of the contract is to help ease the burden to the homeowner when trying to remove a tree that could pose a risk to the public and property.  It is NOT intended to eradicate the insect.  The contract applies only to areas that are considered generally infested, so movement, use, and disposal of the materials is allowed in any way that does not violate the EAB quarantine.
  Originally the contract required un-used materials be disposed of at the "closest EAB Marshalling Yard."  Due to cutbacks in Federal funding and the preference of the USDA that funding be used in areas where control or eradication might be effective (rather than clean up efforts) the State of MI is no longer able to offer free disposal of ash materials.  Soooo we eased up on where the materials are disposed of, as long as the quarantine is adhered to.
  Also an important note!  Ash materials can be moved outside of the quarantine UNDER A COMPLIANCE AGREEMENT (sorry, I am not shouting just want to be clear).  Compliance Agreements (CAs) can be written to fit almost any situation, and require that materials be handled properly.  One example would be for a sawmill outside of the quarantine to receive infested ash logs during the "non-flight" season.  So long as the logs are de-barked, slabbed of 1/2" of exterior wood, and the slabs are disposed of before flight season begins.  Disposal could mean hauling the slabwood back into the quarantine, burning the materials, or chipping the materials to 1" or less (in at least two dimensions).
  You all have so many good insights and questions but Shotgun's suggestion is best.  Call someone from the MDA and talk to people that have the facts.  Other agencies may know about EAB but are not always accurate with the details.  For instance booking a reservation in a campground, you might be instructed not to bring firewood, or told not to bring ash firewood, or not told anything about firewood.  You can, and will be in violation of the quarantine if you are transporting "non-coniferous" firewood out of the quarantine.  Even if it isn't ash!  Beleive it or not some people in this world can't identify ash wood from other species, particularly when its been cut into firewood.  As such the quarantine is not just for Ash firewood.  Also any logs (any "non-coniferous" spp) 4' or less in length that will be turned into firewood are a regulated item and can lead to prosecution.
  I'll stop blathering on now, know the facts, and if possible get it in writing.
Thanks and have a great Holiday.
Jereme
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Jason_WI on December 29, 2005, 05:42:35 pm
Here is an article on Excite about EAB and what is going on to eradicate this bug.

http://apnews.excite.com/article/20051225/D8EN0TOG8.html


Jason
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on April 14, 2006, 08:47:24 am
Didn't know where to put this, so I thought I would put it here.  After 2 fun filled years with the EAB program, I have accepted a new position in Topeka, Kansas, effective 6/5/06.  I will still be with the USDA, just not with the EAB program.  I had a great time here keeping you informed of the issue and meeting all of you.  I will try to peek in occasionally to see what is going on here.  It will be sad to leave Michigan and the program, but this move will put my family in a better position.  Thank you for letting me into your lives.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: OneWithWood on April 14, 2006, 08:49:48 am
Good luck to you Estiers.  I have appreciated your willingness to keep us informed.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: MSU_Keith on April 14, 2006, 09:31:15 am
Thanks for all your help here - good wishes to you and your family in KS.  Make sure you let us know who your replacement is (and let them know about the FF).
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 14, 2006, 11:36:41 am
Thanks for being a part of the forum estiers. I also have a friend into bugs who just moved from Radford, Va to northern Idaho this winter. He's registered on here, but I think he fell off the globe since the move. ;D  :D

Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: 9shooter on April 21, 2006, 09:53:16 pm
I haven't read extensivly about how the emerald ash borer spreads and have been wondering about it. It seems that the effort is primarily in controling the movement of wood. I work in the summer clearing lof jams in some area rivers. It has occured to me that the river systems would be a considerable threat to the spread of the bug. I don't believe it's much of a streach that if the bugs fall in the water they might survive and climb out somewhere along the stream. I have been on the look-out for any infestations/damaged or dieback of ash trees but have not seen anything conclusive yet. I live just south of M-21 and have noticed that quite a few miles of that road is lined with ash trees. With their proximity to 2 major sawmills and a veneer yard it would seem logical to remove those trees. So far the state hasn't done that.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on April 21, 2006, 10:10:41 pm
I've heard from a very reliable source that with the exception of the check point at the Bridge Michigan's  EAB program is for the most part toast.  The budget has been axed :(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: BCCrouch on April 23, 2006, 09:17:01 am
You're not surprised by this old news, are you?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Corley5 on April 23, 2006, 10:46:09 am
Nope not a bit.  From what I was told there is a million and half dollars to work with statewide including the goings on at the Bridge.  Bye Bye ash trees :( :(
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Rural on November 16, 2016, 01:06:48 pm
The Emerald Ash Borer has been moving into SW Ontario, Canada in recent years and has now been found as far north as the northern Bruce Peninsular some 100km north of my property as well as several other areas somewhat closer. So far I have not seen any evidence of them in my bush but I understand it takes some years for an effected tree to show signs. Some municipalities and landowners reaction has been to harvest all mature ash in order 'to stop the spread of the insect' or to sell the lumber before it is effected, this seems to be an ineffective policy. Ash in this area is a very common tree and there is no way that ALL ash trees can be culled and thus the effort to stop the spread by this means is doomed to failure, in y own case it would mean the removal of perhaps 30% of my bush leaving just a few thousand acres of neighbouring properties covered in ash trees!
So after a long lead in can anyone here tell me if an ash tree effected by the borer, perhaps showing the first signs or even all but dead due to the infestation, is still good lumber? It appears that the EAB attacks the outer part of the tree so do we then have 'standing dried lumber' or something that is nothing but firewood?
If we see trees that are effected at what point should we cut them  if we want to mill the wood for lumber?
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on January 25, 2017, 03:25:34 pm
RE:  EAB WORKSHOP

Science and Management of Ash Forests After Emerald Ash Borer
25-27 July 2017
Duluth, MN. 

Please visit our website for more details about the workshop and logistics https://ashworkshop.org/
 
The workshop will focus on the ecological effects of emerald ash-borer and management activities used to address the impacts on ash- dominant forests. Our intent is to discuss the current science and management and to strengthen networking and collaborations among forest managers and researchers. We invite contributions to the workshop in oral or poster format on the following and other related topics:
 
The call for abstracts (https://ashworkshop.org/call-for-abstract/) and registration (https://ashworkshop.org/registration/) are now open. The deadline for abstract submission is 28 February 2017.  We have also arranged for a special issue of Forests focused on this topic, and invite you to submit a manuscript by 31 December 2017.  For more information: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/forests/special_issues/EAB.
 
Nick Bolton
Representing the organizing committee

--
Nicholas W. Bolton
PhD Candidate
School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science
Michigan Technological University
1400 Townsend Drive
Houghton, MI 49931-1295
Tel: 269.303.1017
email: nwbolton@mtu.edu


Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Rural on January 26, 2017, 01:49:50 pm
can anyone here tell me if an ash tree effected by the borer, perhaps showing the first signs or even all but dead due to the infestation, is still good lumber? It appears that the EAB attacks the outer part of the tree so do we then have 'standing dried lumber' or something that is nothing but firewood?
If we see trees that are effected at what point should we cut them  if we want to mill the wood for lumber?

Having waited with baited breath for a knowledgeable sawyer to say if they have sawn any infested lumber without response I can only repeat my request for information in this regard. There have been further reports of infestations here in SW Ontario but dont see any in my bush.......yet!.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: thechknhwk on January 27, 2017, 01:53:02 am
Infested trees make good lumber as long as they don't stand dead too long.  Sometimes they rot, or dry out on the stump and the logs get deep cracks in them.  Hope that answers your question.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 27, 2017, 03:43:20 am
We've been lucky so far here, no bugs. But only a matter of time I suspect. The woods here in the farming areas has lots of ash with maple. One decent tree the moose don't harass too much. ;D
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: square1 on January 27, 2017, 04:44:21 am
What the lumber is intended for also needs to be considered. Boards from an infested tree can make good lumber for local use. It would be poor lumber if the plan was to ship it elsewhere.

@thechknhwk is spot on with the comment about what happens after the tree is killed.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: thechknhwk on January 27, 2017, 04:57:22 am
Shipping out of the area should not matter as long as the lumber is free of bark since the larvae lives in the cambium layer beneath the bark.  Although it may not be allowed or kiln drying may be required depending on your local ordinances.  It's pretty much a lost cause around here.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: square1 on January 27, 2017, 12:26:52 pm
There may be quarrintines in place legally prohibitting the movement of the material. It is correct the larvae live in the cambium but in preparation for the pupa stage it can / does burrow into the sapwood.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on January 28, 2017, 03:56:29 pm
The heartwood of the affected trees are primarily sawn. Much has been sawn here in Lower Michigan.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,31656.msg457361.html#msg457361
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Rural on January 31, 2017, 04:13:11 pm
Thanks guys, I figured the wood would be ok and you have confirmed that, we do have a quarantine area but I am not sure if it applies to sawn wood.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: catalina on January 31, 2017, 05:18:10 pm
Here in Preston County West Virginia (PA and WV line) the emerald ash borer hit with vengence this year. seen a few trees over the last 5 yrs hit but this year it was massive in my area. Terrible.
 
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: DonT on February 01, 2017, 11:15:11 am
The Ottawa area of Eastern Ontario has been hit hard by the ash borer.We are seeing it move steadily west every year. It was my understanding that many of the quarantines had been lifted by the Canadian food inspection agency (regulating body) Sawn lumber with no bark did not have any restrictions that I was aware of. Woodchips, bark , debris and firewood size pieces could not be moved.I would check the CFIA website for updates or check the Ontario woodlot owners assoc. website for information.  DT
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: estiers on March 07, 2017, 03:58:56 pm
Rural - Wood originating in a quarantined area is considered regulated until it has been inspected and deemed "treated" and therefore the risk of spreading the insect is gone.  Sawn lumber would have to have NO wane/bark, and be inspected before it could leave a quarantined area legally.
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on July 28, 2017, 11:19:05 am
Scientists Invade Duluth to Share Emerald Ash Borer Research

(Duluth, MN - July 23) - As emerald ash borers continue to spread across 32 states and two Canadian provinces, killing tens of millions of ash trees of all varieties, more than 170 scientists and forestry experts converged on Duluth to share their knowledge of the pest, offering a look at the future of ash trees in North America.

The E-Forester
Title: Re: emerald ash borer
Post by: Ron Scott on November 01, 2017, 04:25:07 pm
The 2017 EAB trapping in Michigan's UP is complete with no new detections.

Please let MI Dept. of Agriculture know if you have any questions at:

John M. Bedford
Pest Response Program Specialist
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
Pesticide and Plant Pest Management Division
525 W. Allegan
Lansing, MI  48933

P. O. Box 30017
Lansing, MI 48909

Desk: (517) 284-5650
Cell: (517) 243-1247
Fax: (517) 335-4540
E-mail: bedfordj@michigan.gov