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Author Topic: Black Walnut Logs  (Read 2040 times)

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Offline D6c

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Black Walnut Logs
« on: December 22, 2017, 12:24:54 PM »
My brother has been doing land clearing on some bottom ground and an old railroad ROW that runs across it.  He had a logger come in and buy the better walnuts and some white oak.  I don't know what their minimum size is, but it looks like it might be around 18", so there was a lot left they weren't interested in.
I did some dozer work for my brother to strip the topsoil from the ROW (abandoned since the 1950's).  He plans on hauling off the clay from the RR bed (about 1/8 mile long) to level the bottom ground into one continuous field.  He'll stockpile the clay for use as a pond dam behind his house later. 

He didn't want the walnut to go to waste so he gave me what was left, plus some burr oak and cottonwood.  Some of the burr oak will go for trailer decking for my brother's lowboy.  Because there were a lot of small / med. size trees I ended up with a lot of logs, some of which I was surprised the logger didn't want.  By the time I get them cut into manageable lengths for the sawmill it looks like I'll end up with something over 200 individual logs....some small and short but there will still be some wood in them.

As I've said before, I'm just getting started sawing, and I don't have a ready market for the lumber.  This is a windfall of logs for me....and a large task.
The weather has just turned cold here, but I'm thinking I should spend part of the winter sawing and stacking lumber to air dry, and part of the winter building a solar kiln.

Any advice on sawing these would be welcome.  From what I read most woodworkers prefer their 4/4 lumber cut around 1 1/8" to allow for shrink and cleanup....sound about right?
Any advice on how much of it should be cut to thicker size? 
At any rate I'm going to have piles of lumber by the time I get done.  I've started building some pallets to air dry it on.  So far they look like they'll work out pretty well.  I'm covering the stacks with pole barn siding.  The problem will soon be where to store it all.

I don't have 10% of the stickers that will be required to stack it all.  I've made some by ripping store-bought 1 x 3's (3/4 square) but I don't know if there will be problems with using these on the walnut.  I've seen pics of stickers that have diagonal ribs milled across them.  Are these commercially made stickers?....They look nice but have no idea how pricey they might be.
Part of the logs have been coated with anchorseal and I just got another 5 gal.to seal the rest as it's going to be a while getting these sawed.

 

  

  

  

  

  

 

Online TKehl

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2017, 02:02:17 PM »
Nice haul!!!

That walnut will hold for a while.  May want to leave some of them as logs and cut them as sold.  Always seems like customers want a whole bunch of something I don't have.   ;)

Any old stickers will be fine for Walnut.  The fluted ones are good for things like Maple and Cottonwood that sticker stain.   That leads to asking what you plan to do with the Cottonwood?  If some staining doesn't matter, then neither do the sticker type.  If you want it to stay pretty and white, could be worth looking into.  If it will be barn siding, then slap it up green and don't worry about it.   :)

Walnut will air dry nicely reducing the time in the kiln.  The barn tin covers work good.  Just make sure the pallets are strong enough to hold the weight of the boards flat.

Oh, and it looks like some of that would have nice gun stock blanks in the crotches.  Worth looking into.
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Offline D6c

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2017, 04:03:52 PM »
Nice haul!!!

That walnut will hold for a while.  May want to leave some of them as logs and cut them as sold.  Always seems like customers want a whole bunch of something I don't have.   ;)

Any old stickers will be fine for Walnut.  The fluted ones are good for things like Maple and Cottonwood that sticker stain.   That leads to asking what you plan to do with the Cottonwood?  If some staining doesn't matter, then neither do the sticker type.  If you want it to stay pretty and white, could be worth looking into.  If it will be barn siding, then slap it up green and don't worry about it.   :)

Walnut will air dry nicely reducing the time in the kiln.  The barn tin covers work good.  Just make sure the pallets are strong enough to hold the weight of the boards flat.

Oh, and it looks like some of that would have nice gun stock blanks in the crotches.  Worth looking into.

Not sure what I'll use the cottonwood for...the last one I had I quarter sawed up for decking on pallet rack.

It had occurred to me there might be few gun stocks in them.  There are a couple with burl bulges but I'm not sure how a stock blank should be sawed.  Which way should a stock be oriented in the log?

Online TKehl

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2017, 05:36:12 PM »
I'm still learning.  I'll refer you to people that know this stuff well.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,66491.msg994525.html#msg994525
Lucas 6-13+slabber, Mr. Sawmill bandmill, orange chainsaws, JD SSL, Case Backhoe, farm tractors, trailers, and 150ish acres of trees.  Fledgling woodshop with CNC router, laser engraver, Woodmaster 712, and a Berlin 108 moulder (project).  Oh, and a lovely (patient) wife and four offbearers.

Offline D6c

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2017, 06:18:39 PM »
I'm still learning.  I'll refer you to people that know this stuff well.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,66491.msg994525.html#msg994525

Thanks for that link....looks like real good info for stock blanks.

Offline Ianab

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2017, 06:32:46 PM »
Maybe saw some of the cottonwood up first, dry it couple of months, and it will be dry enough to use as stickers for the Walnut, which will last a long time in log form.

Certainly looks like there is plenty of good stuff left in the rejects. Commercial mills aren't interested in crotch wood, and short logs won't produce boards that fit in the grading rules, but can still be sold to woodworkers etc.  You don't need 8' boards if you are only making a 6' table etc.
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Offline Crossroads

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2017, 07:15:54 PM »
Looks like a nice pile of walnut!!
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2017, 08:12:17 PM »
   Good on you. Don't overlook those little firewood lengths with the hollow spots. I cut some like take that into 2"-3" cookies and painted both sides with anchorseal and they held up pretty good. I have sold a few to people for crafts and such. Some wanted to make end tables and such out of them I think they were about 23" wide. The hole in the center seems to help relieve the stress and they are not as bad to crack as a solid piece.

   On my mill I just clamp them directly in the movable hydraulic clamps, set my simpleset and start slicing. Be careful and don't drop them as they are somewhat fragile but turn out to be some pretty pieces.
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Offline nativewolf

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2017, 08:34:33 PM »
My goodness they did leave a bit of money.  However, lots of loggers don't really understand the walnut market.  Sadly.

We cleaned up after a high grade and they left $28k in walnut in 35 trees.  Crazy.

I can assure you that you have some quite salable walnut there.  As others have said it will keep, just seal the ends if you can.  If not, you'll just trim them a bit more.  If you get to a crotch, save those they make neat flame gun stocks.

In those pictures it looks like the crotch wood is missing?  Hope you didn't leave them behind in the burn pile.


Offline ToddsPoint

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2017, 04:53:47 AM »
I'm still learning.  I'll refer you to people that know this stuff well.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,66491.msg994525.html#msg994525

I'm the one who wrote that tutorial and passed it to Jim Rogers to post here on the forum.  If you need help laying out walnut for gunstock blanks PM me and I can probably help you.  Gary
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Offline D6c

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2017, 05:58:49 PM »
I'm still learning.  I'll refer you to people that know this stuff well.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,66491.msg994525.html#msg994525

I'm the one who wrote that tutorial and passed it to Jim Rogers to post here on the forum.  If you need help laying out walnut for gunstock blanks PM me and I can probably help you.  Gary

Thanks,
When I get to sawing crotch wood I might have a few questions

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2017, 08:16:58 PM »
Although I have an alaskan mill, I'm saving up my crotches to take to a guy with a Petersen slabbing mill to slab them all at once.  He's much faster and more efficient.  If your crotches are too big for your mill, think about that.  It would be a lot of hassle to set up to slab short crotches for me.

Get your logs on bunks - some small diameter long logs or timbers to space them 6 inches off the ground at least.  Seal the ends, and walnut like that will wait a long time.  You'll have plenty of time to mill it.

Don't leave good wood at the site.  You got some good saw stuff, but don't discount small diameter and curved walnut.  I saw 6"-16" dia curved pieces, don't have to curved too much, for timberframe brace stock 6-8 feet long(PM me if you want specifics on how to do this and how to prep the live edge).  I use small dia 4"-6" long branches for railings.  Cut them flat on two sides.  Keep the top side live edge and de-bark.  Smaller pieces with interesting curves are good for furniture as legs or part of tops etc.  They can be used whole or sawn on two sides, maybe split down the middle for two matched pieces.  Smaller crooked branches can be used for balusters- de-barked preferably.  I let very little go to waste/firewood.
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Offline GAB

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2017, 01:41:28 PM »
In the picture with the Farmall one of the logs appears to have a bow to it.
If it was my log I would consider sawing it into 2-1/2" thick slabs for benches around a fire pit.
A slab with 3 17" blocks makes a good bench.
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Offline D6c

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #13 on: December 24, 2017, 02:56:59 PM »
Although I have an alaskan mill, I'm saving up my crotches to take to a guy with a Petersen slabbing mill to slab them all at once.  He's much faster and more efficient.  If your crotches are too big for your mill, think about that.  It would be a lot of hassle to set up to slab short crotches for me.

Get your logs on bunks - some small diameter long logs or timbers to space them 6 inches off the ground at least.  Seal the ends, and walnut like that will wait a long time.  You'll have plenty of time to mill it.

Don't leave good wood at the site.  You got some good saw stuff, but don't discount small diameter and curved walnut.  I saw 6"-16" dia curved pieces, don't have to curved too much, for timberframe brace stock 6-8 feet long(PM me if you want specifics on how to do this and how to prep the live edge).  I use small dia 4"-6" long branches for railings.  Cut them flat on two sides.  Keep the top side live edge and de-bark.  Smaller pieces with interesting curves are good for furniture as legs or part of tops etc.  They can be used whole or sawn on two sides, maybe split down the middle for two matched pieces.  Smaller crooked branches can be used for balusters- de-barked preferably.  I let very little go to waste/firewood.

I've got some old power poles I'll use to get them up off the ground.  Just didn't have time to sort & pile them when I was hauling.  I did get the ends sealed just before it turned cold and snowed.

It was kind of a hurry up deal getting out what I could. He was in a hurry to clear up the field, get the brush burned and do some tillage before the weather turned.  There was no doubt more that could have been salvaged but it's all smoke now.
I have no experience with timber framing or furniture building for that matter.  From looking at your gallery you do some nice timber framing.  It would be interesting to try my hand at it, although I'm guessing there's quite a learning curve.  I have plenty of old osage that was planted in the 1930's.....Hmmm, I do need a saw shed.

Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #14 on: December 24, 2017, 07:01:59 PM »
   I had posted earlier about a couple of dead walnuts on the stump I have on my place. Right now I know of a 3 about 14-15 inches at the base and one about 20-22 inches. Today while trying to train my rat terrier to become a squirrel dog I came across another one that fell in an ice storm 10-15 years ago but it looks to still be rock solid. I will either get some long cables and snatch blocks and pull it out or if I get enough logs to move I may get my mule skinner friend to come back for a one day job moving them out of the woods into the pasture for me and I can move them with the tractor then.

   I have a friend who has a big one in his yard he cut last spring. It is about 30-36 inches in diameter and 10' long. I tried to get it out for him but we got it hung in his ditch and could not pull it out. He has since gotten it free and I may try to get it loaded on a trailer and haul over to the next county to a sawyer with a slabber and get it cut into 3" live edge slabs. I think he gets 50 cents/bf for slabbing and it could take years to sell it all  but one good slab would pay for sawing and the rest would pretty much be profit.
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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2018, 10:06:47 AM »
I found a dead walnut on the stump while cleaning a fencerow this fall.  It looked like rotted junk and the other guy working with the was going to cut it up.  I said NOOOOO!  So i had him cut it for a 12 foot trunk and the two upper branches.  I cut the trunk into and 8X10 and the heartwood was perfectly find.  I sawed the branches on two sides for organic pieces.  The sapwood was compromised and we used draw knives and removed the majority of the sapwood and ended up with perfectly fine pieces.
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2018, 12:46:15 PM »
   I'm with Gerald on the curved logs being cut into live edge slabs for benches. I cut mine 8/4 and put mortise and tenon legs on them, cut off the excess tenon length then put them upside down on the mill, clamp, spread the blade guides wide and cut at 17". When finishing I sand them and rub with tung oil.

   The uglier the log the prettier the bench no matter what design you use for the legs. Caution - if you have too much bend you may need to put an extra leg in the middle of the bend or they may be off-center and want to tip over backwards. (Don't ask me how I learned that. ;D)
Howard Green
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Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Magicman

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2018, 01:14:33 PM »
 

 
Who would ever use curved slabs for benches??   :o
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Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2018, 01:23:17 PM »
To me, getting them off the ground is a waste of time as it only dries them quicker and warms them.  Green logs are the opposite of lumber that must be off the ground.

Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Black Walnut Logs
« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2018, 04:55:09 PM »
To me, getting them off the ground is a waste of time as it only dries them quicker and warms them.  Green logs are the opposite of lumber that must be off the ground.
?????

   Discussed before. My logs rot when I leave them on the ground, especially softwood and soft hardwood.

    Only reason I leave logs (other than very durable logs like WO, Locust or Walnut) on the ground is laziness/neglect, I know I will saw them in the every near future or I want them to spalt and that is a fine line between the neat color lines and rotting.
Howard Green
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Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

 


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