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Author Topic: Red Maple timber drying  (Read 865 times)

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Online mike_belben

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Re: Red Maple timber drying
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2017, 09:27:05 PM »
Sorry for the sidetrack

Online Don P

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Re: Red Maple timber drying
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2017, 10:47:24 PM »
If it works better use the analogy of a very thick wood floor that is in direct contact with the radiant slab. The low thermal conductivity of the wood will choke the ability to transfer enough heat from the radiant slab through that floor to keep the building warm.

I'm not saying it can't be done, or that you cannot heat the home, I've done it. I'm saying it is inefficient. It requires higher water temps and more energy to heat the house than if the wood was not there. As soon as you have to turn up the water temp to maintain the same comfort level, that excess heat energy isn't in the house, it is outside.

Try this;
http://timbertoolbox.com/Calcs/conductivity.htm
Enter this, Lets look at 1 square foot, you have the tubes 2" down in the concrete and at that level it is uniformly 80F, the room above is 65F, click enter, 62.46 btu's per hour are flowing from the 80 degree slab to the 65 degree surface. Now leave the temp delta the same, change to wood and .75" thickness, 18.04 btu's/hr can get across that material at that temp spread.

How are you going to get the needed number of btu's across the wood? Turn up the water temp. turn up T1 to 117, and presto we can get the needed btu's through the wood floor. In order to get the same number of BTU's inside the building we've had to turn up the water temp 37 due to the wood floor. Can you do it? Sure. It doesn't come free  :).

By turning up the slab temp we have increased the delta between slab bottom and earth and slab edge and outside air... you can play with the calc and see the increase in btu flow across those materials.

Now put a bunch of wood mass on the radiant slab, enter 4" thick wood floor, 80 degree slab temp, I've got 3.38 btu's leaking through. The room is still losing temp at a rate that requires our 62 btu's/square foot/hour, can you get there?

Offline Hackermatack

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Re: Red Maple timber drying
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2017, 06:39:29 AM »
Sorry for the sidetrack

I consider myself a expert at hijacking threads. You sir are the master, job well done  :D
Jonsered 2230, 590, 70E. Kioti DK 35 /w fransguard winch. Hudson Oscar 236

Online mike_belben

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Re: Red Maple timber drying
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2017, 08:33:41 AM »
:takes bow:

Thanks for the clarification Don.  I agree with what youre saying now, i initially took you to mean "it wont work"

Offline Hackermatack

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Re: Red Maple timber drying
« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2017, 11:51:04 AM »
I have see radiant under all sorts of floors most of them seem to work quite well. I like it because I seem to feels warmer at a lower thermostat setting and in the case of a radiant slab very little fluctuation in temperature. My son has a 45 x 66 shop with 17' ceilings and 3 overhead doors heated with radiant in the slab and a outdoor boiler. We had heat loss calculations done before the build and the experts said that the slab would not produce enough BTU's to do the job so we plumed in provisions for some Modine heaters. That was 8 years ago and to date we have not installed them. It is not uncommon on a below zero winter night to have 4 plow trucks covered with frozen slop and loaded with half frozen sand parked inside. It does take a while for the temperature to recover when all three doors are opened and the trucks are put in but come morning everything is thawed and ready to go. 
Jonsered 2230, 590, 70E. Kioti DK 35 /w fransguard winch. Hudson Oscar 236

 


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