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Author Topic: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?  (Read 1062 times)

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Offline opticsguy

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proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« on: November 03, 2017, 11:54:12 am »
Dealing with a 730 year old Douglas Fir slab - cookie - log or whatever.   This DF is 8 feet 2" diameter about 2 foot in thickness. 

Is this a cookie or a slab or a log or???  Sorry no pics, do not know how. 

Thank you!!!

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Online Magicman

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2017, 12:03:25 pm »
A two foot long round sounds like a stick of firewood to me.   ;D
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Offline pine

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2017, 12:21:57 pm »
At 98" in diameter and that age it is definitely old growth so it has all the resiliency that the young stuff doesn't.  Cookies cut from that at 2-4 inches would work or for long end tables or mantles 1.5 to 2 ft by up to 8 ft long.  That sounds like about 6-8 nice table tops to me.  Properly dried it should be amazing and with the quality of old growth you should be able to do that.
Anything old growth is hard to find even in your neck of the woods and back east it almost can't be found.

The real question is where is the rest of it and what happened?

Offline thecfarm

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2017, 01:20:13 pm »
How are you moving something of that size?  :o
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2017, 01:24:45 pm »
   I am confused. You say it is 8'2" in diameter and 2' thick. I always think diameter and thickness are the same.

   Is this 98" in circumference and 2' long or is it 2' in diameter and 8'2" long?
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Offline JRWoodchuck

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2017, 01:56:14 pm »
From how I read it I believe it is a cookie that is 2' tall and 98" across. That is a serious chunk of DF
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Offline btulloh

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2017, 03:26:58 pm »
WV, it sounds like big cookie - a slice across the log.  Now that it's a cookie it's two feet thick and 98" across.  When it was a log it was 98" in diameter.

 no matter what it's called, it's pretty DanG cool that it's that old.  It would have been a big tree when Columbus was a cub scout.  They make tabletops out of those with historical references on the growth rings.  That one would go back farther than anything I've seen.
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Offline opticsguy

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2017, 07:48:28 pm »
OP here.  This giant "cookie" is already on display but has been out in the weather since the mid 1960's.  My intention is preservation.  I need to present a preservation program to many different individuals and companies along with the national forest service and simply wanted to use the correct term when referring to this "cookie".  Appreciate the input here.

On display at the Mt Baker Ranger Station in Glacier, Washington State. The original log was placed on display in 1938, was about 8 feet long, a true log.  The replacement in the mid 1960's was "only" a cookie. 
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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2017, 07:55:01 pm »
I would refer to it as a "section" or a "segment".
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Offline Ben Cut-wright

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2017, 12:52:52 am »
OP here.  This giant "cookie" is already on display but has been out in the weather since the mid 1960's.  My intention is preservation.  I need to present a preservation program to many different individuals and companies along with the national forest service and simply wanted to use the correct term when referring to this "cookie".  Appreciate the input here.

On display at the Mt Baker Ranger Station in Glacier, Washington State. The original log was placed on display in 1938, was about 8 feet long, a true log.  The replacement in the mid 1960's was "only" a cookie.

Did it look like this?




Offline terrifictimbersllc

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2017, 07:35:56 am »
I agree, call it a 2 foot section of an 8' diameter redwood log, for example.   
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Offline SineWave

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2017, 10:28:26 am »
730 years old ... holy cow!

Offline opticsguy

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2017, 04:59:51 pm »
Yes Ben Cut-wright,  This is the Cookie I am chatting about. Slowly deteriorating in the wet rainy/snowy weather at the foot of the Cascade Mountains.  I am working on a project to both preserve and protect this display for future generations.  I am lining up a timber supplier, a timber framer, a construction company and more, all volunteer work to get this project started and finished in 2018.  The biggest hurdle will be convincing the NFS and getting permission to do this project on an historical site.  Obviously the proposed protective structure will match the historic looks of original building s on-site.
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Offline Ben Cut-wright

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2017, 08:04:51 am »
I thought it was, opticsguy. 

Living through almost seven and a half centuries earns that massive portion of such a magnificent tree a more honorable name than "cookie", imo.   "trunk section" seems a good term.

Glad you are interested in restoring and preserving  this display.  Good luck with the project.

Offline btulloh

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2017, 08:27:57 am »
I thought it was, opticsguy. 

Living through almost seven and a half centuries earns that massive portion of such a magnificent tree a more honorable name than "cookie", imo.   "trunk section" seems a good term.

Glad you are interested in restoring and preserving  this display.  Good luck with the project.

Good point.  I vote for "trunk section".  Amazing trunk section you have there.
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Offline Kbeitz

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2017, 04:24:50 pm »
I wouldn't think it would need preserving.
I would think that it would be petrified by now...
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Offline esteadle

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2017, 07:24:47 pm »
I'll propose a rule of thumb...

If the disc / cookie's diameter exceeds it's thickness / length ... it's a Cookie.

If the thickness / length exceeds the diameter...  it's a log.

If they are exactly equal, you get to call it what you like... either one.

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Offline woodworker9

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Re: proper terminology for a slab - cookie - log or?
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2017, 09:30:09 am »
My only comment is to say that I think it is fantastic that you are trying to preserve it, and I hope that your endeavor is a successful one.  If I were closer, I would definitely volunteer my time.   Good luck.
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