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Author Topic: suggestions for sawing thin  (Read 630 times)

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Offline Raym

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suggestions for sawing thin
« on: November 01, 2017, 08:06:40 am »
I have an average size (12") cherry log that i would like to saw thin. Probably 1/8-3/16 if possible, if not I know I can saw 1/4". The intended use will be for shaker oval box bands. These wont be dried other than air driying so my question is should I just sticker them and add weight? or are there any other precautions that I need to take. I guess my biggest concern would be splitting while drying because of how thin they are. Thanks in advance for your input.....
'14-LT40 super, nyle l200m kiln, vintage case 480E loader.

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Offline dboyt

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Re: suggestions for sawing thin
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2017, 08:51:47 am »
I saw parts for instruments (mostly dulcimers).  Best way I've found is to cut to 1-1/4" thick, air dry, resaw to 3/16", kiln dry, then surface to the final dimension.  For kiln drying thin pieces, I use 1/4" x 1/4" stickers every 2", and weight them down (keeping them in sequence so they can be book-matched).
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Online Treehack

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Re: suggestions for sawing thin
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2017, 09:06:45 am »
I sawed a few 1/4" pieces of cherry a month or so ago just for fun while I was cutting some 4/4.  I have not had any issue yet with splitting, but they want to cup more than the 4/4, so as mentioned above closer stickering and extra weight is probably in order.  Since you are using for bands, might try bending a couple around your forms as they come off green leaving a little overlap for shrinkage and dry them on the form to see how they do.  If it works, would save you having to steam them later to bend them.
TK 1220, 100+ acres of timber, strong left arm.

Offline Brucer

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Re: suggestions for sawing thin
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2017, 12:48:53 am »
Several years ago a local woodworker had me saw a big Western larch into FOHCX 4x12's (he had to split the log with a chainsaw so I could handle it with the LT40). When I was done he asked me to stand each cant on edge and saw it into 5/16" strips ... and leave them stacked together in the same order as I cut them.

When I was done each cant, I strapped the pieces together with my poly strapping/buckle system; one strap near each end, one in the middle. Even though 30% of the wood was missing when I finished (sawdust), you could still see the grain pattern on the side of the bundle. When I lifted the bundle off the mill with the loader, it bent into an arch (but you could still see the grain pattern, now curved).

The customer took the bundles to his shop and after carefully marking them, he re-bundled them into 4 bundles each about 2" thick, and left them to dry as a unit for a couple of years. Then he planed them to 3/16" finished thickness.

The final product was a curved handrail around a spiral staircase. He was able to reconstruct the cant so the grain showed on the surface.
Bruce    LT40HDG28 bandsaw with two 6' extensions.
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Online drobertson

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Re: suggestions for sawing thin
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2017, 07:14:09 am »
I've done it for fun, just to see what happens,, it will warp around unless it's constrained.  I believe resawing a thicker cant would be the way to go. I had a fellow contact me from out west years ago. He was needing FAS WO  2" x 6-8".  He in fact resaws, steams and bends, then laminates back into spectacular beams,,very impressive work,,like fancy stuff. He paid top dollar, but finding the clear, clear stuff, is a tall tough order to fill.
only have a few chain saws I'm not suppose to use, but will at times, one dog Dolly, pretty good dog, just not sure what for yet,  working on getting the gardening back in order, and kinda thinking on maybe a small bbq bizz,  thinking about it,

Offline opticsguy

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Re: suggestions for sawing thin
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2017, 08:19:20 pm »
On my TK I have many times sawn 1/16" veneers, stacked to dry and then glued together for various thin projects.  1/16" is easy so thicker is even easier.....
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