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Author Topic: Ontario, Canada, Juniper - Uses, Milling and Drying/Processing  (Read 196 times)

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Offline tschick

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Hi everyone,

My property is in Southern Ontario on the Bay of Quinty. I've got roughly 20 Juniper trees and some Ash I need to cull to allow for other trees like Black Walnut, Apple. Cherry etc. to flourish.

I'll use some of it for the woodstove, but would like to make some lumber. Never done that.

There's mills in the area, but transport is problematic, so if I can mill the felled trees on site that would be preferred. Sizes range from 8" to 24" at the trunk. All are at least 20' or longer in length.

20 trees is a big project. Any thoughts on preparation, execution and storage?

I've heard Junipers can be hard on chains; that they tend to draw up minerals (grit) from the earth during growth. A few locals have said you can see tiny sparks coming off the saw if you cut it at night. I'm wondering if this is a this a myth (don't want to use my saw at night...lol) , or should I plan for a lot of sharpening? Anybody ever heard of this before?

Can anyone recommend a good chainsaw jig for milling? I have a Husky 345 16" saw. Which reminds me, should I get a bigger saw....???

If I'm going to mill it for lumber, at what diameter should I terminate the length and use the rest as waste? IE: "Burn everything under 8 inches..."

We're planning a number of projects around the house and I was wondering if anyone had thoughts regarding best usage for this type of lumber. I have one project in mind where I'll need 16 ft posts (deck over sun room construction). As it's a softwood, I'm not sure about it's lateral tensile strength.

I know the stuff is resistant to rot and bugs don't like it, so I thought it would be ideal for using outdoors.

20 stumps. :o I've thought about renting a stump grinder, but have never done this type of work before. Would that be too much work or should I consider having a guy come in with a backhoe?

Are the woodchips from this type of cedar tree useful for anything such as mulch or pest control? I'll likely end up with a lot after it's all cut.

Finally, any thoughts on best practices for drying and processing Juniper?

If anyone can offer some advice on any of these questions, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks everyone :-)

Offline GAB

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Re: Ontario, Canada, Juniper - Uses, Milling and Drying/Processing
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2017, 07:40:10 pm »
I sawed some juniper 5/8" thick and sold it to a fellow for making jewelry boxes.
The rest of what you are asking I do not consider myself qualified to reply to.
Hopefully someone else will be along soon with answers.
GAB
W-M LT40HDD34 w/6' ext & SLR, JD 420, JD 950w/loader and Woods backhoe, V3507 Fransguard winch, Cordwood Saw, 18' flat bed trailer, and other toys.

Offline tschick

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Re: Ontario, Canada, Juniper - Uses, Milling and Drying/Processing
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2017, 09:21:52 am »
Thanks GAB,

Not much response to the post; looks like I'm on my own for research. I know a local guy who make furniture in the area - I'll ask him about uses for Juniper.

Cut my first one down yesterday, looks like I'll be able to get about two felled and limbed per day. I'm terminating at 4" to be on the safe side and then leaving the whole length as is.

What do you use for a mill?

Offline GAB

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Re: Ontario, Canada, Juniper - Uses, Milling and Drying/Processing
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2017, 07:36:28 pm »
If you look at the last line of my post you will see the equipment I have listed.
You might want to consider saving the juniper sawdust and try and sell it in small bags as a moth deterrent.
4" is a bit small to try and saw, but not bad for a fence post.
You wrote:
"I've heard Junipers can be hard on chains; that they tend to draw up minerals (grit) from the earth during growth. A few locals have said you can see tiny sparks coming off the saw if you cut it at night. I'm wondering if this is a this a myth (don't want to use my saw at night...lol) , or should I plan for a lot of sharpening? Anybody ever heard of this before?"
To me that is the cost of doing business.  Some trees are harder on blades than others.  I was told black locust has a lot of silica which kills blades.  The only time I sawed some I had a partial box of bad blades and used them for that. Broke every one of them.
I cut down an Eastern Hop Horn Beam, aka ironwood tree close to dusk one evening and I did see sparks.  It sawed beautiful just had to slow down a bit.
Gerald
W-M LT40HDD34 w/6' ext & SLR, JD 420, JD 950w/loader and Woods backhoe, V3507 Fransguard winch, Cordwood Saw, 18' flat bed trailer, and other toys.