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Author Topic: Wolf Creek Indian Village Bastion Virginia  (Read 244 times)

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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Wolf Creek Indian Village Bastion Virginia
« on: June 01, 2017, 02:14:37 pm »
    If any of you will be passing near Bastion Virginia about a mile from exit 58 on I-77 near Bastion Virginia you should consider stopping and taking a tour of the Wolf Creek Indian Village site. This attraction is about 8 miles before you get to the the WV line on I-77. They are open from 0900-1700 Monday through Saturday. They are closed a couple of months in the Winter but I think are considering staying open then too. The last guided tour starts about 1530 so you need to be there before then to fully appreciate the site. Their prices are listed on their site but the whole family can go for $35 so that is the most you have to pay. They have a good website at http://www.indianvillage.org/index.html.

   The site was found during some road construction/expansion when Wolf Creek had to be diverted. They found the site of a village from approximately 500 years ago and delayed construction a few weeks to let the archeologists study and map it out. The site was a palisaded village and they were able to find and map every post from the perimeter and every home, located the fire pits, several graves, etc. They never determined which tribe of Indians actually lived there but from all indications the occupants packed up in an orderly fashion and left. They cannot tell how tall the buildings or fence were because all that is left were the rotted out posts.

    We made a day trip down there yesterday with our 11, 9 and 5 y/o granddaughters. Our guide was Lindsey an approximately 21 y/o who has been working there since she was 16. She was very knowledgeable and personable. She kept the girls entertained and spoke to them in terms they could understand. The girls learned about the foods the tribe grew, caught, foraged and killed. They saw bison skins, bones, horns and deer and elk antlers.  They learned about flint napping, leather tanning and working, fire making with a bow and drill, lawn darts made from a corn cob and turkey feathers, dream catchers, etc.

   The girls had a real good time and really liked getting Lindsey to apply war paint on their faces and let them help start a fire and play darts and learn about pottery making.

   As I said, if you are near or passing in near by try to schedule time to go see this site. it is educational and entertaining.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"