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Author Topic: BIRDS  (Read 271874 times)

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Offline thecfarm

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #960 on: December 19, 2011, 08:16:59 am »
I have 4 ponds close by me,that can be seen from the road common to see a couple loons in any of the ponds. We lived close to one growing up and my brother could do a good loon call.
I put out some bird food a good month ago and have not seen a bird come to it,no chickadees,finches,nut hatches,nothing. Just like there is a blanket over The C Farm feeder. We always use to get a steady flow of something.
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Offline miking

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #961 on: December 19, 2011, 08:37:16 am »
Made a reservation for a birding tour in Kingsville Texas yesterday for my wife and I. Anybody been on this trip or done any south Texas birding?

My bird adviser [bil] advised me he and his son had toured down near Harlingen, Brownsville, Rio Grande Valley area several years back. He says a great area for rare Central American species as well as western U.S. birds. He mentioned seeing a 'Crane Hawk' and the Vermillion Flycatcher, alias.. 'little coal of fire'. Have a great time & Merry Christmas!

Thanks. I got a few birding brochures from the Kingsville area talking about the great stuff we will likely see, but all brochures say that, lol. I do know that there are several border-area-only hawks I would like to see and a bunch of songbirds as well as the whooping crane festival just north of Kingsville in Feb. We'll be early for that, but the birds should be there anyway.BY the way, there were 5 whooping cranes sighting just north of me last week.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #962 on: December 19, 2011, 11:04:55 am »
With an open mild fall there seems to be lots for the birds to eat. I see lots of chickadees, blue jays, doves, buntings, finches, junco and so on in the yard and I never feed the birds. I saw a robin a week ago.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline sandhills

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #963 on: December 19, 2011, 07:15:38 pm »
SD, what kind of doves?  We have mourning doves or "turtle doves" around here but they usually disappear with the first frost, I'm suprised you'd have them this late in the year.

Offline chain

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #964 on: December 19, 2011, 07:54:24 pm »
As for as doves go we have more and more Eurasian-collared doves each year. They're more hardy than I ever thought they could be and tough it out during the ice and snows staying around nearly all winter. The mourning doves will, on occasion, get caught in a long, sub-freezing spell and die by the hundreds.

I've been feeding several with cracked-corn and sunflowers, they're a beautiful dove.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #965 on: December 19, 2011, 10:08:58 pm »
Sandhills, we have morning doves year around as well as rock doves. Put out a bird feeder around here and both will show up. I see the doves on the gravel shoulder of roads all winter. The morning doves roost in the spruce behind the house, they are in pairs. Starlings stay here all winter to, wish they would go extinct.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline sandhills

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #966 on: December 20, 2011, 01:25:38 am »
We have had a new dove move in in the last couple years, I wonder if it's the eurasian-collared dove that you are talking about chain, looks a lot like a mourning dove (maybe a little lighter colored) but about the size of a pigeon ???  They stay here year around, SwampDonkey, you seem to think the same of starlings as I do  ;) we get them by the millions during the winter, especially around feedyards.

Offline Kansas

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #967 on: December 20, 2011, 04:16:05 am »
Its quite a sight to see starlings around a feedlot. Friend of mine that has one once tried to poison them. K State university told him how much they were eating in feed a year. He finally gave up; with other feedlots in the area, if he did kill his, all the others would move in. Kind of sad when I go out there and you might see a 1000 lb fat calf sitting down, with half a dozen starlings sitting on him, including one perched on his head. They have also gotten so thick that 2 or 3 times a year they sit so close on the power lines to his feed mill that they short across where the transformer is, and pop the line fuse.

Offline chain

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #968 on: December 20, 2011, 08:05:48 am »
We have had a new dove move in in the last couple years, I wonder if it's the eurasian-collared dove that you are talking about chain, looks a lot like a mourning dove (maybe a little lighter colored) but about the size of a pigeon ???  They stay here year around, SwampDonkey, you seem to think the same of starlings as I do  ;) we get them by the millions during the winter, especially around feedyards.


The collared dove will have the tell-tale dark,"ring-around-the collar" of his neck. MDC has included these doves in the bag limit as well as white-winged and common turtle dove.

Speaking of nusiance fowl, we have tens of thousands, even maybe hundreds of thousands of 'Sky Carp' feeding in all the flooded rice-fields..sky-carp..are snow geese, looked upon by most wheat farmers as a nusiance, almost unlimited bag possession on them as in early spring the geese turn to the wheat pulling it up by the roots. But on the plus side, a farmer may have tens of thousands of geese feeding in his field..that's alot of free fertilizer! ;D

Offline Autocar

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #969 on: December 23, 2011, 04:49:15 pm »
Sence were not feeding sunflower seeds this winter are bird feeding is pretty sad. Ive been buying regular bird seed and have seen a couple of nut hatchers bluejays woodpeckers but mostly regular old barn sparrows. I blame alot of it on our farming country, all the fence lines are gone and cover is getting to be something of the past. I rather have the tree lined creeks and fence rows but Iam afarid its all but over around here  :(
Bill

Offline miking

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #970 on: December 24, 2011, 09:23:31 am »
Same here. I went on our Christmas bird count last weekend and we only came up with ~ 40 species, none of them particularly unusual and I was counting in rural country. Mostly we picked up crows and starlings with surprisingly few house sparrows. We are starting to seed more Eurasian tree sparrows here as well as collared doves although I saw none on the count. Your comment about fence rows reminded me about bobwhite's, which we haven't seen or heard around here for years.
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Offline Autocar

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #971 on: December 24, 2011, 02:16:48 pm »
We lost almost all game birds and rabbits in 1978 from a blizzard and they never did come back. Pretty sad but not alot a fellow can do about it.
Bill

Offline Patty

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #972 on: December 29, 2011, 07:08:25 am »
We have lost our pheasant due to harsh winters these past 10 years or so. Back in the 70's & 80's, pheasant were plentiful....but the winters were very mild back then. This year we are having a very mild winter, temps in the 40's F and no rain or snow. This should help the pheasants unless we get a lot of rain in the spring.
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Offline Onthesauk

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #973 on: January 04, 2012, 11:18:43 pm »
Another email from my Sister, north of Ketchikan:

"the big news here is i watched an eagle/octopus battle a couple days ago. i looked out the window and saw an eagle at tideline right up to the beach with something he was picking at. got the binoculars and it was an octopus! and a big one, orange, arms maybe the length of my mine. when i moved to the window the eagle must have spotted me, spooked and he eventually flew off. then the octopus kind of re-grouped, got himself right-side up again and moved on. i suspect he had a headache from the eagle's pecking. octopus (octopi??) are common here at depths, but i've never seen one in the shallows." 
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Offline sandhills

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #974 on: January 05, 2012, 10:16:41 am »
Well now, there's something you don't see everyday, especially in Nebraska  ;D.

Offline miking

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #975 on: January 06, 2012, 08:05:21 am »
Eagles really aren't accustomed to killing things as they typically just find dead fish to eat. I suppose he just gave up when the octopus fought back for a while.
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Offline sandhills

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #976 on: January 06, 2012, 01:47:23 pm »
The salmon were running while I was in Alaska and I can say first hand that eagles are excellent fishers, they weren't dead fish either, but I'm sure scavaging? is one of their strong suits.

Offline WildDog

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #977 on: January 07, 2012, 03:08:01 am »
Our Wedgetail eagles down here are both predators and scavengers especially on road kills. They are a big eagle with a six ft plus wing span, regularly taking live lambs, my mates weaning rate this year was only 40% due primarily to "Wedgy" eagle predation. We only get a breeding pair here each year and they don't cause any problems unlike the crows, we would of lost 50 goat kids to crows this season.

In 2000 my old partner and I were driving a truck load of 16 prisoners in the outback from the station to jail and a Wedgtail was feeding off roadkill, it was early morning and the eagle couldn't get altitude quick enough, he got caught between the mirror and the window. My partner was driving with the window down and got this big screaching head in the cab :D funny now but not at the time.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #978 on: January 09, 2012, 05:42:49 am »
No pictures, but for years I have noticed a little flock of 6 or 8 wild ducks spend the winter at the mouth of Hartley Brook where it dumps into the Presque Isle River. The little brooks here never seem to freeze over solid like years ago.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

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Offline Magicman

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #979 on: January 09, 2012, 08:13:35 am »
Maybe the Winter has been too mild, but I have only seen one flock of Wood Ducks, and no geese.
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