The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:




TimberKing Sawmills




Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Forest Products Industry Insurance


Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades


Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA

Forestry Forum Tool Box

Author Topic: BIRDS  (Read 272036 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline miking

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Peoria, IL
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #880 on: July 01, 2011, 08:29:28 am »
It's a cattle egret. I've seen then resting on the backs of cows, watching for bugs to get stirred up by the hooves. They are one of the few egrets to be seen reliably quite some distance away from water.
Echo CS530, 600 and 680 chainsaws, SRM410U brushcutter, PB500 blower and PP265 power pruner. Also a Stihl 192c for the lil' stuff.

Offline doctorb

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4052
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Glyndon, MD
  • Gender: Male
  • Unofficial Team Physician
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #881 on: July 01, 2011, 12:06:49 pm »
Unfotunately, as pretty as egret are, cattle egrets are a bit like starlings.  They are an overpopulated non-native species from the middle east ( I think).  They in no way compare to the grandeur or beauty of our two native egrets, the Snowy or the American egret, IMO.
My father once said, "This is my son who wanted to grow up and become a doctor.  So far, he's only become a doctor."

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35185
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #882 on: July 01, 2011, 04:09:54 pm »
This sparked a little comment from me. Our native Canada geese that are very few in numbers fly north to nest, I mean way north of here. Now, about 20 years ago we had a premier in this province that took in troublesome/nuisance Canada geese from Ontario. Mostly around Toronto, if I recall. Now what we have around here are those darn blasted things nesting here in our province and now the town of Nackawic has to kill off a huge flock of the things because you know how geese can soil a place up. They have to destroy over 300 of'm and they had to get permission from the Canadian Wildlife Service with a special permit. Now just as bad, is those same line of geese feeding on crops in farmers fields. Farmers fields aren't meant to be wildlife food plots up here, that is rarely ever done up here. Don't mess with mother nature.  >:(

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Norm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7659
  • Age: 61
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #883 on: July 01, 2011, 04:49:59 pm »
Farmers fields aren't meant to be wildlife food plots up here

I wish our DNR understood that. We get the pleasure of feeding them so they can sell licenses to make money, same with whitetail deer.

Offline miking

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Peoria, IL
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #884 on: July 01, 2011, 09:09:43 pm »
Unfotunately, as pretty as egret are, cattle egrets are a bit like starlings.  They are an overpopulated non-native species from the middle east ( I think).  They in no way compare to the grandeur or beauty of our two native egrets, the Snowy or the American egret, IMO.

I have some literature that says they are native to Africa, were brought to South America and got here on their own. I didn't see them here until a couple summers ago and have seen them more and more, which is never a good sign with exotics.
Echo CS530, 600 and 680 chainsaws, SRM410U brushcutter, PB500 blower and PP265 power pruner. Also a Stihl 192c for the lil' stuff.

Offline doctorb

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4052
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Glyndon, MD
  • Gender: Male
  • Unofficial Team Physician
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #885 on: July 01, 2011, 09:59:23 pm »
They have been here for as long as I remember being interested in birds.  I never see any other egret a distance from water.  Makes them seem out of place to me.
My father once said, "This is my son who wanted to grow up and become a doctor.  So far, he's only become a doctor."

Offline miking

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Peoria, IL
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #886 on: July 03, 2011, 09:05:05 am »
They also seem to flock more tightly than other egrets and herons
Echo CS530, 600 and 680 chainsaws, SRM410U brushcutter, PB500 blower and PP265 power pruner. Also a Stihl 192c for the lil' stuff.

Offline miking

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Peoria, IL
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #887 on: July 06, 2011, 06:31:04 pm »
Saw and heard a black-billed cuckoo today. First one in a long time. The yellow ones are far more common here.
Echo CS530, 600 and 680 chainsaws, SRM410U brushcutter, PB500 blower and PP265 power pruner. Also a Stihl 192c for the lil' stuff.

Online Mooseherder

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7909
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Mainely Fl.
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #888 on: July 12, 2011, 06:31:46 pm »
There is a spot on the Indian River in Sebastian I go to once in a while to eat my lunch.
As I was pulling in today, there was a Snakebird aka Anhinga that just speared a fish and was trying to position it for swallowing.  The video isn't the greatest because I was hurrying and still rolling into the scene but if you can look at it in full screen it's okay. :)

Lane Circle Mill

Offline miking

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Peoria, IL
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #889 on: July 14, 2011, 12:11:23 am »
Always wanted to see an anhinga but so far I haven't. There was a report of one about 40 miles north earlier this year from me though but there are a lot of cormorants around too, and they are pretty similar at a distance even with a scope. Today I saw a green heron and a kingfisher, but the highlight was 5 otters which I had not seen in the wild before.
Echo CS530, 600 and 680 chainsaws, SRM410U brushcutter, PB500 blower and PP265 power pruner. Also a Stihl 192c for the lil' stuff.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35185
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #890 on: July 14, 2011, 03:02:00 am »
The otters are more common here, but always seen them in the main river. They have been coming up the creeks by home off and on after the beaver and fish. Since they will kill the beaver, they are welcome to it. I've tracked them on the snow to beaver lodges in winter. They go under the ice in the creeks, most don't freeze up shore to shore like they did years ago. Well, I suppose there was always open spots, but these last few winters you wouldn't catch me walking on creek ice.

That being said, I've been seeing a lot of grouse this season with young. The hens whimper like a dog to distract you from the chicks. They are about quail sized now and can sure fly. Most places I'm in it's too thick to see much, all you hear are the chicks taking off in flight one at a time. Crazy darn timber chickens. :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline miking

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Peoria, IL
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #891 on: July 14, 2011, 10:00:12 pm »
They did a big release of the otters in the late 90's here and I have heard they have done well. Too well, according to some as they have munched fish out of a few local farm ponds I've heard. I was with a IDNR biologist at the time and they were the first she'd seen as well, so apparently they aren't as common as some would have you believe around here.  :)
Echo CS530, 600 and 680 chainsaws, SRM410U brushcutter, PB500 blower and PP265 power pruner. Also a Stihl 192c for the lil' stuff.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35185
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #892 on: July 15, 2011, 02:51:38 am »
The biggest complaint here the neighbor had was with the blue herons. There was one around his ponds all the time as we have a lot of herons around.

Today I saw a couple old ravens beside the road. These are a larger bird than the common crow, sitting side by side the raven is a huge bird and sounds a lot different. They have a scruffier face, because the feathers aren't slicked back like a crow, and thicker beak. They are smart buggers to. They are always present it seems when your in the bush and you can here them calling for a long way off.


Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline chain

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 997
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #893 on: July 15, 2011, 10:24:50 am »
The otters are more common here, but always seen them in the main river. They have been coming up the creeks by home off and on after the beaver and fish. Since they will kill the beaver, they are welcome to it. I've tracked them on the snow to beaver lodges in winter. They go under the ice in the creeks, most don't freeze up shore to shore like they did years ago. Well, I suppose there was always open spots, but these last few winters you wouldn't catch me walking on creek ice.

That being said, I've been seeing a lot of grouse this season with young. The hens whimper like a dog to distract you from the chicks. They are about quail sized now and can sure fly. Most places I'm in it's too thick to see much, all you hear are the chicks taking off in flight one at a time. Crazy darn timber chickens. :D

Around here, the otter-beaver seem to co-exist quite well. I put my own quota on the beaver and otter @six each per trapping season. The beaver soon got out of hand, the otter held their own but the last year I trapped caught 12 beaver and six otter out of a 25acre pond area. The otter like to stay in beaver lodges in winter but this one lodge had about six beaver residing in it. There was some otter scat up top of the lodge. Some beaver stay in dens along a steep bank and are very cautious. The otter move out about the first good warm-up in spring and go fishing for yum-yummy crayfish, but I can see a large otter killing a baby beaver for sure!

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35185
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #894 on: July 15, 2011, 04:34:55 pm »
Yesterday I saw an osprey on the river, he caught a fish. Two eagles, one was a juvenile, both harassed the pour osprey until he had to drop his fish to get air speed from those darn things. I know it's nature, but if eagles are suppose to be such great fishers, then fish on their own. I used to see it on the river during salmon season to. An eagle is just a glorified crow with white head and tail.  :-X >:(

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline chain

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 997
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #895 on: July 16, 2011, 10:58:38 am »
Yesterday I saw an osprey on the river, he caught a fish. Two eagles, one was a juvenile, both harassed the pour osprey until he had to drop his fish to get air speed from those darn things. I know it's nature, but if eagles are suppose to be such great fishers, then fish on their own. I used to see it on the river during salmon season to. An eagle is just a glorified crow with white head and tail.  :-X >:(

I've always heard Nebraska eagles were..uh..different. But our Missouri eagles, how proud, how strong, and swift of wing they are, always guarding our National Treasures.

You can have all the red-tails and buzzards, don't send them south in the fall! ;)

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35185
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #896 on: July 16, 2011, 11:10:02 am »
NB is not the abbreviation for Nebraska. ;) But, in the mean time if a national emblem is a scavenger, so be it. ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline chain

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 997
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #897 on: July 16, 2011, 02:49:01 pm »
My most sincere apologies! Joke's on me. Funny, but now I think I remember Ne. Nebraska? :)

Offline DouginUtah

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1210
  • Age: 76
  • Location: Hyrum, Utah
  • Gender: Male
  • You can't always have a tailwind, sometimes it's going to be a headwind.
    • Doug Sherwin's Homepage
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #898 on: July 17, 2011, 11:41:54 pm »
 
When the male can't stand it any longer...







-Doug
When you hang around with good people, good things happen. -Darrell Waltrip

There is no need to say 'unleaded regular gas'. It's all unleaded. Just say 'regular gas'. It's not the 70s anymore. (At least that's what my wife tells me.)

---

Offline sandhills

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4914
  • Age: 44
  • Location: east egde of the hills, Nebraska
Re: BIRDS
« Reply #899 on: July 18, 2011, 01:29:48 am »
Ya, but in this household it'd probably be the other way around  ;).  Can't say I blame her though.