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Author Topic: BIRDS  (Read 271954 times)

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Offline thecfarm

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #740 on: March 17, 2011, 08:11:20 am »
I've only seen turkeys vultures here.Use to work outside with some guys.The old joke was when we would see a vulture circling over us we would tell one guy to start moving the vultures thinks you are dead.I don't think I've ever seen more than 3-4 at one time.Probably down to Decoster's hen barns would be many.Saw one in a tree just above the road one day.I had to stop and look at it.Never saw one that close before.It was some ugly looking.
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Offline northwoods1

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #741 on: March 17, 2011, 10:08:04 am »
Walked outside this morning and I can hear the sandhill cranes are back. That is a sure sign winter is pretty much over :)

Offline northwoods1

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #742 on: March 17, 2011, 11:15:14 am »
Now I walk outside and there are Robins sitting on my driveway, hurray!! :D
Never mind that the snowbanks are still 5' high.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #743 on: March 17, 2011, 12:01:50 pm »
I expect to see robins here by Monday. They may already be here, it seems to be on the mild side of what remains of winter for here on out. It's almost 50 F here today and more rain expected for the remainder of the work week. The wicked witch of the west says, "I'm melting"  :D 8)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline Mooseherder

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #744 on: March 17, 2011, 12:12:46 pm »
Bill, you know winter ain't done with you yet. :D
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #745 on: March 17, 2011, 12:34:42 pm »
Well, I don't want it to get too warm for a while. Can't build a shop fire then. :D A nice little fire keeps the moisture at bay in the shop projects. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #746 on: March 17, 2011, 03:41:43 pm »
Mom said the robins had returned today on the hill, saw three.  56 degrees here now. 8)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Chuck White

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #747 on: March 18, 2011, 09:39:48 pm »
So far, I've seen Redwing Black birds, Robins, Turkey Vultures, Killdeers, and today, I saw a pair of Blue Birds in the yard!

Yesterday I saw a large flock of Canada Geese flying NORTH.

Warm weather isn't far away.
~Chuck~
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Offline chain

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #748 on: March 19, 2011, 09:41:26 am »
Had about a dozen 'myrtle' warblers visit last evening. Can mostly tell of new arrivals, they come down from their flight and lite high in a tree then send their scouts down to see about possibilities of food, the whole bunch will soon come down in a apple or mulberry, the limbs quite bare, but the warblers are after insects, they had a feast yesterday as it was 72 degrees, the bugs were out.

A bird to watch for now is the Cedar Waxwing, they are my favorite of the migrants, often dropping in much the way the warblers do. But they want berries or fruits from junipers, cedars, hollies, or whatever is left from winter. The most interesting of habits the waxwings have is, they will line up side by side on a limb, the outside bird will then pick a fruit and give to the next bird in line and so on and on they give the fruit until the last bird in line is fed. Not always but notice they do this when fruits are plentiful.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #749 on: March 19, 2011, 02:35:58 pm »
Cedar waxwings stay here year around. I have fed the juvenile waxwings pin cherry by hand. In winter they will fleece the high bush cranberries which overwinter on the twigs. We also get the Bohemian waxwing in winter, it's a western bird. Our cedars have cones since they are not junipers, but the waxwings will eat seeds. I herd on the radio last summer that robins don't eat fruit, but the person obviously has no clue. They eat apples, mountain ash, chokecherries and cranberries which adorn old orchards and fence rows in this country. I see flocks of them especially in the fall gorging themselves on them. The little kestrels will scout these orchards for a meal of robins and do it in groups. Everyone benefits in the harvest. :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Chuck White

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #750 on: March 19, 2011, 03:39:01 pm »
Saw a Brown-Headed Cow Bird this morning trying to make up it's mind "which bird house to lay it's egg in"!

I hate Brown-Headed Cow Birds.  Too lazy to raise their own "kids"!
~Chuck~
Retired USAF (1989), Retired School Bus Driver (2012), and now a Mobile Sawyer
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG2425 Kohler - Shingle & LapSider
Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain the Wood-Mizer.
I LOVE MY SAWMILL

Offline miking

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #751 on: March 26, 2011, 09:34:42 am »
Got a fleeting glimpse of what I *think* was a hermit thrush the other day but there are still juncos around. It's been a tentative spring here for sure. Did see my second ever red shouldered hawk the other day which was exciting.
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Offline Onthesauk

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #752 on: April 03, 2011, 08:53:28 pm »
Yesterday, April 2nd, here in the NW, had our first hummingbird show at the feeder.  A little female was first this year.  Usually a big male arrives every year but over five years old now and I think and maybe old age got him.  And we even had heavy snow for an hour to welcome them.
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Offline clww

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #753 on: April 03, 2011, 09:42:51 pm »
We have this wreath we hang on the front door after we take down the Christmas wreath. 2009 and 2010, we had finches nest in it. When they start, I take it down and put in in the corner on a 2X4 with a 2 foot piece of plywood and zip tie it in place so it doesn't fall off. This year, 2 hours after I swapped it out, there's a pair of doves building a nest. I moved it to the corner the next day. She sat on the nest from March 4th until the 25th when her two eggs hatched. The last 3 days, she leaving the nest for a bit several times a day and returns at night. I'm guessing they will all fly away by next Sunday. I named her "Miss Beasley" after the Bush's Scottie in The White House.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #754 on: April 04, 2011, 04:33:16 am »
We have been seeing geese and ducks here now. The lower head pond of the Saint John is still iced over, but the mouth of smaller rivers and brooks that feed into it are open. Our little river nearby , the Presque Isle, has been ice free for a couple weeks.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Faron

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #755 on: April 04, 2011, 07:28:49 am »
As I was driving home the other day, a big red tailed hawk swooped under a tree overhanging the road.  He made an attack on an English sparrow flying around and missed.  He wheeled in midair and spun to his left, and grabbed another bird in flight.  I have seen red tails catch lots of mice and a few rabbits, but this was the first time I saw one grab a bird in flight.  I've seen smaller Cooper's hawks catch birds, but not the big red tailed hawks.  He sure seemed to know how it was done.
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Offline chain

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #756 on: April 04, 2011, 09:26:29 am »
As I was driving home the other day, a big red tailed hawk swooped under a tree overhanging the road.  He made an attack on an English sparrow flying around and missed.  He wheeled in midair and spun to his left, and grabbed another bird in flight.  I have seen red tails catch lots of mice and a few rabbits, but this was the first time I saw one grab a bird in flight.  I've seen smaller Cooper's hawks catch birds, but not the big red tailed hawks.  He sure seemed to know how it was done.

But what is strange, a red-tail will allow a couple of crows to dive bomb and harrass him all the way across a 1/2 mile field! Years ago when crow season was open throughout the year, we would set-up a electronic caller, usually on a pine ridge-top in a remote area. We had a tape called 'Battle cry' mimicking a fight between crows and a owl. We would add our own touch by blowing a red-tail hawk caller. In a minute or two after truning the caller on, down the crows would come through the pines looking for a fight! Weaving and darting this way and that and within 15' of the ground, this made for quick exciting action. After the initial attack, we would pull up and move over 3or 4 miles for further combat!

I've seen migrating red-tails come down in a soybean field that we were harvesting and kill every rabbit. After nine or ten kills I got sick of it and tried to run over a hawk with the combine, the old hawk just grabbed his prey in one talon and skipped across the rows out of the way.

Offline Chuck White

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #757 on: April 04, 2011, 09:41:09 am »
We haven't seen any humming birds yet, they usually arrive around the end of the first week of May!

The Brown Thrashers will arrive about the same time!

After that, we just wait for the Tree Swallows and later, the Barn Swallows!
~Chuck~
Retired USAF (1989), Retired School Bus Driver (2012), and now a Mobile Sawyer
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG2425 Kohler - Shingle & LapSider
Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain the Wood-Mizer.
I LOVE MY SAWMILL

Offline doctorb

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #758 on: April 04, 2011, 12:46:43 pm »
I think the number one bird attacking hawk around here is the Sharp-Shinned.  People with bird feeders often see sharpies sitting on a nearby perch, only to have some bird disappear off the feeder in a swoosh.  I agree, I have never witnessed a red-tailed hawk take a bird before.  Unusual.
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Offline chain

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #759 on: April 04, 2011, 09:00:40 pm »
A few winters past, some friends and I were having coffee and sitting inside the coffee shop by a glassed atrium for added warmth, for we had a large snowstorm and frigid weather for a week. Suddenly a hawk flew down and lit outside the atrium and ran a few steps into a clump of monkey grass about three feet high. Soon, the hawk reappeared just next to the windows and I could clearly see not one, but two bands on his legs. One band was the regular aluminum type, the other band appeared to be a blue plastic; I could read a partial number off the blue band, '07' is all I can remember now.

The hawk stayed around for a couple of days and was quite an entertainer for others to enjoy. I informed our local conservation agent but after calling around the State, the only hawks that were under a hawk-banding program was the peregrine falcon and were only banded with aluminum bands.