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Author Topic: BIRDS  (Read 271958 times)

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Offline submarinesailor

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1180 on: December 26, 2013, 11:14:17 pm »
 Ran across this guy during my last visit to Ithaca, NY.  I have always had a thing for Blue Jays.   i can remember as a kid we always had them in the woods. Than they just went away. Now it appears that they are turned to the northern Virginia area.


 

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1181 on: December 27, 2013, 03:34:26 am »
Yes, they are very common around here. Put out a feeder and you'll have 30 or more by the end of the week. One year there was sunflowers growing up in the potato field. Those darn 'gorbys sack'n and hiding the seeds. Dropping a lot too it seems.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

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Offline Mooseherder

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1182 on: December 27, 2013, 03:58:25 am »
The Bluejays harvest our Live Oak acorns every year.
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Offline clww

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1183 on: December 27, 2013, 05:11:22 am »
We had at least three different pairs that had babies on our cabin property this spring. Pretty to look at, but they are bullies to the other birds.
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Offline doctorb

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1184 on: December 27, 2013, 10:04:50 am »
One thing I've noticed about Blue Jays.....

While they are stiking in appearance, they have garnered a reputation in the east as an undesirable bird by some people because they can be loud, squawking, and aggressive.  They are often taken for granted by most non-birders.  What I have noticed on several occasions is that, when people from out west come east and see our Blue Jay, they marvel at its appearance and think its one of the most atractive birds they've ever seen.  Further, the same thing happens in reverse.  When easterers head out west, they see the Stellar's Jay and comment on how beautiful the bird is, while the people out west think its a pest. 

The grass is always greener......
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Offline RynSmith

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1185 on: December 27, 2013, 10:10:19 am »
They're not my favorite Corvid, but I think they're only bullies in the sense that they're smarter than your average songbird...   ;D

And Doc, you're right!  I still think Stellar's jays are beautiful when compared to blue jays, eight years after my westward migration.  Familiarity breeding comtempt?  :D

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1186 on: December 27, 2013, 11:14:59 am »
They are intelligent birds and look after their sick and old family members. I've seen it lots of times. They will bring food and watch over the injured ones. When we hear them fuss, it is a sign of a pending storm coming. One of my favorite birds.  :)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

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Offline Road Runner

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1187 on: December 27, 2013, 11:27:47 am »
Blue Jays are important for genetic diversity of eastern oaks.  They will collect and bury (plant) acorns away from the parent trees.  Squirrels do the same thing, but usually under or closer to the parent oaks. 
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1188 on: December 27, 2013, 11:35:32 am »
We had snow buntings here yesterday. Family was here for Christmas and there was 3-4 birds on the ground under the feeder. DIL saw me looking hard and came to look too. She had no idea what they was either. Out came the bird book and she found what it was.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1189 on: December 27, 2013, 03:47:05 pm »
We have the snow buntings here to. They have been here since the end of October. I never see them around a feeder though, they are very timid and stay in large flocks around here. They look similar to wintering goldfinch, only a lot more white.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

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Offline chain

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1190 on: December 27, 2013, 07:05:27 pm »
Blue jays, like the crows are sort a rarity here. I've even missed them in our timber while hunting, when they spy something like a bobcat, coyote, or fox, hawks and owls, they really put up a fuss!

We had a crow nest in a pine several years back. I had stepped outside and heard an awful squawking, four or five jays had attacked the crow nest killing one young crow and knocked the other crow down to the lower branches where I captured the little fellow and fed it earthworms for a few days and allowed it to fly away.

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1191 on: December 27, 2013, 07:19:57 pm »
Crows are pretty well off up here. We have lots of'm. Just toss a chicken carcass out the back yard and see how quick you see crows. Usually as far as nest robbing and harassment, it's the crows doing it. :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline ancjr

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1192 on: December 27, 2013, 07:54:02 pm »
I saw a few crows really doing a number on a squirrel once.  He was dragging a piece of field corn through the back yard.  The crows came down out of the trees and surrounded him.  A crow would sneak in on him, and the squirrel would attempt to defend his corn by snapping at the advancing crow , but this was only a ruse.  The other crows would nip the cob behind his back.  They all did this in turn, nipping at the squirrel until they flew away, leaving him with an empty cob.   :/

Offline terry f

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1193 on: December 28, 2013, 04:15:08 am »
    Most people around here call steller's, blue jays, just like they call western larch, tamarack. People don't like to be corrected, so I try to use the correct names, but am guilty as most. Steller's and gray jays seem to know when you're eating lunch, almost tame if food is involved.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1194 on: December 28, 2013, 05:03:37 am »
When at fishing and game camps in my younger years I could feed gray jays (whiskey jacks) bread from my hands. They are very friendly. We do not see them in the settlements, the cats would probably have lots of jays for lunch. The blue jays would also be around and steal the jack's stash. :D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline Onthesauk

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1195 on: January 11, 2014, 08:09:58 pm »
We've got a clump of cottonwoods next to the highway about 4 miles west of town where two bald eagles use almost every January for a month or so.  But yesterday I came up the valley mid-day and spotted 7 of them sitting in "their" tree.  40 feet off the highway, 50 feet in the air.
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Offline RynSmith

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1196 on: January 11, 2014, 11:31:22 pm »
There's an eagle tree I drive by often and the last time the pair was sitting up above their nest by ~ 15 feet - wish I had a camera for that one!  Nesting soon...

Offline thecfarm

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1197 on: June 05, 2014, 10:15:07 pm »
Here's 2 geese in our field. They show up off and on all summer. Will see the gosselins behind the parents in the pond. Most times at early evening,I can hear the pair honking,coming back to the pond.

 

 

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Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1198 on: July 09, 2014, 12:21:43 pm »
Anybody know this guy?

 
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Offline doctorb

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Re: BIRDS
« Reply #1199 on: July 09, 2014, 12:53:53 pm »
Real hard to tell with the lighting of that pic of that Buteo.  Large wing span.  Could even be an eagle. I'm interested in others opinions as to which species it is.
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