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Author Topic: Questions On Tree Removal for Client  (Read 2185 times)

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Offline sandsawmill14

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Re: Questions On Tree Removal for Client
« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2017, 07:49:32 am »
Someone had also recommended to me that since there is nothing but empty field to the north of the tree to use a pickup truck and 1/2" rigging line to fell the tree in one piece against its lean. Would this also be advisable? To me it seems like while it would be substantially quicker it would also substantially increase the penalty for failure as this tree has a decent lean to the south, in my opinion.

this is how i would have cut that tree in pic but with one that size i wouldnt consider a truck but i have a 85 hp tractor we use to pull with ;) the biggest i can remember pulling was a 34" post oak that was dead standing about 30' from the house and the limbs were actually touching the roof of house (from lack of being trimmed) and was leaning toward the house ALOT probably 15-20 we always use a snatch block and the tree hit perfectly were we wanted it  8)   BUT i (with the help of my 2 brothers ) have done this several i mean several times sometimes in yard sometimes in the woods logging when the joining land owner wont allow you to fall across the line and drag them back ::) on those jobs you could have to pull 150 or more trees :o so it gets were its not so scary ;)  the main thing is never step out of your comfort zone when if you mess up you hit something important :)   and the 34"post oak i described was at MY HOUSE so if we mess up i didnt have to worry about being sued   maybe some knots on my head from the wife dadgum you, Charlie! bat_smailey :D :D :D
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Offline Jemclimber

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Re: Questions On Tree Removal for Client
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2017, 07:39:04 am »
I generally try not to offer armchair advice based on a lone picture. However, based on what I can see, most decent climbers would have climbed that tree and had it on the ground in 1-2 hours.  It looks like very a simple job and I would have priced it closer to what your friend did.  I will comment that in my area, contractors are not allowed to drag brush to the road for the town to pick up. If you are charging the customer for removing the tree, you should be removing the tree, and not using to town as part of your bid.   If you are getting into tree work you should at least own (or possibly rent for awhile) a chipper and a truck to blow the chips into in order to remove the tree and all of its parts.  In my opinion, it's a little dishonest to charge the homeowner for work the town will be doing.
I will add that charging much less to just get it on the ground is reasonable and what the homeowner does with it is their business. As a broad statement, my bids are usually about half for getting it on the ground and half cleaning it up.  I wish you well on your venture into tree work. You may want to under price some of these easy jobs for awhile, and climb them just because, to gain more experience and confidence.  Go slow and small at first and speed will come. Always remember T. I. T.,  Tie In Twice while running the saw.   
lt15

Offline DonT

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Re: Questions On Tree Removal for Client
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2017, 02:23:13 pm »
If you  are going to add tree care to your business you should look in to getting some formal training if you do not already have some. That tree looks to be an easy pull with a rope puller or 5-1,( I never pull with a vehicle)that said it would slightly damage the lawn and require reairs.
 Pricing can vary significantly from region to region,but is based on many variables such as  ,difficulty, location, hazards ,and disposal. Is it common for municipalities to pick up debris? If you don't own a chipper that sounds great otherwise it would save time to have the chipper right beside the brush and minimize the length of dragging it.  Felling a tree should never be rushed,take your time and do it properly within your skill set.By minimizing the foot print of the project is where you can save time and money.The less area you have to rake the easier it is.
The most important tool you will own is a rake."nobody remembers the job you did,but the mess you left.Impecable clean up gets you referals. I might be different from others in my business values but the high end waterfront property gets the same service as the working class family or older retirees.