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Author Topic: LT15 wide vs LT15?  (Read 1117 times)

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Offline Brad_bb

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LT15 wide vs LT15?
« on: January 05, 2017, 12:30:19 am »
Woodmizer lists LT15wide max cut width as 36".  This is a departure from what Woodmizer usually specs.  Usually the spec largest diameter log that can be cut.  Of course largest log has to be reduced on at least two sides before it will fit within the actual max width of cut of most mills.

Since the LT15wide specs max cut width, they should also spec max cut with for the LT15 as a comparison.  I have an LT15go and I measure the max cut width between the guides as 22.75 inches.

I'm suspicious as to the max cut width between the guides of the LT15wide being 36".  Do they really mean max log dia??  I want to know the actual distance between the guides when fully open?

Also have they created an adaptor kit or some way to run the MP100 beam planer on the LT15 wide?  I really wish they had more travel for the MP100 so you can plan as wide as the mill.  On the LT15 you can plane 20 inches.  I have to use a Makita power planer to take off anything over 20 inches wide.  It would be nice to be able to plane large table slabs with the MP100 or a version that will cut wider. If you could get another 8 inches, that would cover most table slabs.    I let them dry for a year to stabilize and then put them back on the mill and plane them flat again.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline ScottCC

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Re: LT15 wide vs LT15?
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2017, 08:07:35 pm »
I not sure where to start.  These two machines you speak of are the heart of my operation and the idea you have is what I'm working on as we speak.  After a few conversations with Woodmizer and the BossMann here is the route I'm taking.  Dave gave me a quote for another traveling head like the Lt15 wide and I am going to retrofit my mp100 into it.  The head is about $1000 with rollers.  And I'm pretty sure at the same time I can split the machine and make it work to a lot wider degree, TBD.  I have a local fabricating nut, we all have them who will do all the real work.  I'm a "point and wish it would" person when welding is involved. 

When I got the mill I order two extra tracks so I could nest the machines out of the way when necessary.  I plan on adding length to go out to 64'.  And here is the next move, I also ordered from metalmizer the heads that, when fixtured properly, will allow me to turn the band mill blade 90deg.  You know why.  The most affordable big safe cut-off saw ever, perfectly square to my logs.  Granted my depth of cut is about 10.25", but it might be enough.  And what is the next big dream.  If the cut off saw works, buying another lt15 wide with much bigger wheels and making a dedicated chop saw that will do 24".  Why, my work needs to be accurate, repeatable and with little to no tear-out like a chain saw would do.  I will be working with much of the natural edge in tact. Ultimately then, I will have lined up on the track a saw mill then molder then cut-off saw.  The hope being the log will then push along the length on nylon tracks using air to lift when required. 

During my BossMann discussion I also learned that the mp100 comes out of Poland and they just have not had "the time" to fully integrate I guess.  Thank you my Polish brothers.  And if all goes well with my latest bid I have out I will make an order in two weeks.
Necessity is the mother of invention.  Poverty is its big brother.  Woodmizer mp100, Woodmizer electric  lt15 wide with extra track, 71 Oliver allterrain forklift, 26' flat bed trailer, road legal log arch, homemade kiln, AutoCAD lt15

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: LT15 wide vs LT15?
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2017, 10:53:43 pm »
ScottCC,
Sounds like we have similar set ups.  I'm mostly doing timbers for my timber frame builds.  I do a lot of curved timbers that I mill on two sides to incorporate into the timberframes.  That is tricky work, but after the curved pieces have stabilized in the barn for a year, I'll put them back on the mill and use the MP100 to plane the flat and  parallel again.  What the MP100 won't reach, I use a makita 6" power planer to clean up.  I just started doing some thick book matched table slabs that I will let stabilize like the curved timbers, then come back later and re-flatten them.  I'd be interested to keep up with your modifications.
I have some vids of my milling here:
https://www.youtube.com/user/falfas55bgas
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline ScottCC

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Re: LT15 wide vs LT15?
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2017, 08:39:09 am »
I accidentally solved the arch plane problem in one pass.  Building a set of 21' pressure treated arches out of decking boards on a jig, glued and screwed on a jig then released, got a little ugly.  So to clean up the side that showed I set them on the planer to flatten.  Did not fit width wise.  So while planning I pushed the arch sideways so the planning was taking place in two directions.  Problem solved.  I would guess your arches are shorter so, new invention.  Get three trollies that run on I-beams, and fit the lateral supports on your molding bed.  One on each end and one in middle of arch.  Put a lazy suzzan type bed on top of them.  Maybe an integral clamp and go, I would go slow.  Perfectly flat one pass.  A retention wheel on the bottom would help.  Spring loaded.  No chatter then normal then.  My guess $600 out the door.
Necessity is the mother of invention.  Poverty is its big brother.  Woodmizer mp100, Woodmizer electric  lt15 wide with extra track, 71 Oliver allterrain forklift, 26' flat bed trailer, road legal log arch, homemade kiln, AutoCAD lt15

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: LT15 wide vs LT15?
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2017, 05:52:12 pm »
Are you using the HSS straight planer knives?  How many sets do you have?  I have 8 sets or so.  They chip so easily. I've never had one, but seems like the Byrd Shelix cutter head would be nice to have.  They'll make one, but not cheap!
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline ScottCC

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Re: LT15 wide vs LT15?
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2017, 07:46:31 pm »
It would be wrong to say I use the mp100 a lot.  I got it when I could in anticipation of producing my log home kits.  Have used on little jobs and for testing.  Same blades as when I got it.  HSS straight blades.  When I start the real work I need an ordered knife to both joint/dimension my logs on opposing sides and put in a groove 2" wide and 2" deep according to current calculations.  Some change possible depending on rescheck.
Necessity is the mother of invention.  Poverty is its big brother.  Woodmizer mp100, Woodmizer electric  lt15 wide with extra track, 71 Oliver allterrain forklift, 26' flat bed trailer, road legal log arch, homemade kiln, AutoCAD lt15

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: LT15 wide vs LT15?
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2017, 09:02:53 pm »
I accidentally solved the arch plane problem in one pass.  Building a set of 21' pressure treated arches out of decking boards on a jig, glued and screwed on a jig then released, got a little ugly.  So to clean up the side that showed I set them on the planer to flatten.  Did not fit width wise.  So while planning I pushed the arch sideways so the planning was taking place in two directions.  Problem solved. 

I wasn't sure what you meant when I read it the first two times.  I think you are talking about a curved piece being too wide to sit on the mill bed and plane, so you rotate the curved piece while on the bed as you pass the planer over it?  I've done this on some very curved pieces.  Most pieces fit on the mill, or fit enough that the outside little bit that doesn't get planed, I go back with a 6" Makita power planer and take it off.  I demonstrate this at   3:33 of this video.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!