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Author Topic: Wells and FHA Loans  (Read 1539 times)

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Offline JJ

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Wells and FHA Loans
« on: October 17, 2016, 12:18:36 pm »
Hi All,

I am at point where I must relocate to be closer to my new place of work; after going through what is kindly termed as a 'Life Change Event'.

So, put my home in Maine on market, and after long wait finally get an offer.   The buyer is going through FHA for financing, and we have discovered that on January 1, FHA has changed minimum depth of wells from 12' to 20'.   My well was in compliance at 12', but not for 20'.   It does not matter that I still have water in middle of severe drought in NE, and have passed the full water test.

I called full dozen well drilling companies, and all are backlogged until mid December or January due to many wells failing in the state; and most have increased prices by 20% or more  (way to take advantage  :-\).  Since I close in 3 weeks and the cost, drilling is not an option.

I am talking to excavation company, who has hoe big enough to dig current well (or nearby) to 20'.

However are there other options?
    1. Lift cap off dug well, and drive in a point an additional 8' (soil here is rocky/sandy with clay).
    2. Dig 20' hole, or as deep as the excavator can go, and dump load of washed beach sand, set point, then backfill with more washed beach sand.
The second suggestion was from a soil expert, but searching internet, I find no examples where this has been done.
I really don't want to just drive a point well, as these seem unreliable.

Any advice from FF?

Kinda stinks that buyer's financing is forcing me to spend money to address this, but they are maxed out on financing, and offered my asking price.

       JJ

Offline LeeB

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2016, 12:47:40 pm »
Reduce the price by the cost of the well and let them drill it.
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Offline Joe Hillmann

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2016, 01:00:08 pm »
I don't know about where you live but here you can't put a new well or point in a pit.  They have to be above ground.  Anything other than a new pump(without pulling the casing)  is considered a new well and wouldn't be allowed.  You should check the laws there to see what is allowed.

Could you just disconnect the well,  Sell the property without running water and once they buy it they can reconnect it?

Online ljohnsaw

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2016, 01:05:04 pm »
+1 on the price adjustment.  However, lenders can be a real PITA.  They can and often refuse to lend if not in compliance at close.  I would try to talk with their lender and explain the backlog of drillers and see if they would keep money in escrow to have the well improved in the future.  Never hurts to ask.  As far as having a backhoe dig, that would not fly out here.  They want a casing and concrete sealing the top from contamination from surface water.  Sounds like your water table is pretty high.  How do you handle septic systems?
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Offline JJ

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2016, 01:44:09 pm »
Because of the Federal loan program, everything must be in compliance at closing.
For dug well, aside from new 20' depth requirement, it must be encased in concrete well tiles (4' diameter concrete culvert, in 2' sections), and covered with concrete top.   This is how my current well is built.
In Maine the septic leach fields require 100' of space to well, but septic tank can be 50'.

For contamination, the points would be encased in well tile, with tee 5' down from top (to connect supply line below frost), then top leg of tee would continue up to above high water, but below the cement cover.

I do think the point inside a dug well would get cross-eyed view, so I am back to giant excavator, and complete back yard destruction.

       Jim

Offline scsmith42

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2016, 11:21:31 pm »
Unless you are drilling through solid rock, a hydraulic auger on a skid steer (with extensions) should be able to take care of that for you a lot cleaner than using a backhoe too.
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Offline Holmes

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2016, 11:01:20 pm »
The hydraulic auger and a mud sucker pump .  Load a few 2' or 3' well tiles onto the bottom of the well and pull the dirt out from under them and let them sink down.  Of course you will hit rocks and boulders, you are in Maine.

Can you add 8' to the top of the well????:D :D :D
Think like a farmer.

Offline LeeB

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2016, 11:34:15 pm »
Can you legally dig or deepen your own well and it be accepted? Most states require you to be licensed to do well work.
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, Ford 851 tractor, JD 3032 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton and 2005 1 ton Dodge 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline dsgsr

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2016, 04:06:39 pm »
Bite the bullet and hire the largest hoe you can find Locally. Have them dig as deep as they can and set tiles as needed. They can also dig a ramp down to walk the hoe into too dig even deeper, I've done this before so it Can be done. Doesn't sound like FHA is going deal unless this is finished by closing.

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Offline r.man

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2016, 07:02:47 pm »
I am a bit late on commenting, have been very busy, but here goes. I have 25 years experience with sand points and consider them the cheapest drinking water source available, bar none. They also produce good water that is almost impossible to contaminate unlike dug wells and consistently produce good non smelling water, unlike drilled wells. A sandpoint in my area would be expected to last about 12 to 15 years so the cost of the water supply only here works out to be under 100 dollars a year. The bad is that they don't always work and in lots of places it is impossible to drive them at all. Ask around to see what your neighbours have but the best nod to a sandpoint is if one has been in place previously. The proper place for a sandpoint is in a basement for winter access but this is not always possible due to septic setbacks or lack of basement. In my area a sandpoint is considered the same as a drilled well for septic setback as long as the point is about 20 feet below ground level. That may be the rule you are running into, I expect it is designed to limit ground contamination by providing enough filtering of ground water. Driving a sand point in a well is not an ideal situation since the well water may become contaminated and contaminate the sandpoint draw level which can not normally happen.
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Offline snowstorm

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2016, 05:32:07 pm »
i have dug several wells over the years. and being 100 miles north of you the ground conditions are different. here it would be clay and rocks. i always used 4ft tiles. dig the hole quite a bit bigger and back fill with gravel. in clay the bucket when digging will compact the sides of the hole and that will close off the vein for a while. after a few mins it will start flowing again

Offline JJ

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2016, 10:40:13 am »
Thank you for all advice and suggestions.  I know much more about wells, droughts, and Federal financing.
Finally after much concern in end turned out to be non-issue.

I think it grandfathered the new rule for 3 reasons:
  • Current loan (mine) was also FHA
  • Still had good water and passing water tests in peak of drought, which now seems to be at end
  • No professional well drillers were available due to long backlogs due to failing wells


So it is closed.

        JJ

Offline shelbycharger400

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Re: Wells and FHA Loans
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2016, 11:12:24 am »
I had issues when i bought mine in 2007.   My well .. 4 in tube is only 38 ft deep.   The local well driller said cant drill deeper as its granite below.   I have good water thats passed several times now.   Neighbors have 75 foot wells.   Biggest hang up was that i have a jet pump.   They are noisy, but its nice knowing when it dies i can fix it in 20-30 min.  Ive already had to do it once.