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Author Topic: Sugar maple invasion  (Read 2903 times)

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Offline grouch

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Re: Sugar maple invasion
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2016, 05:40:19 pm »
A reminder of a (dangerous) old saying:

"A woman, a watchdog, and a walnut tree
The more you beat 'em
The better they be."

(Don't try the above at home. It's an ancient saying that will land you in deep, dark trouble if practiced).

Every time I've seen a prolific production of seeds it's been because the plant was under severe threat. Maybe something's after some or all of your maple trees. I've seen dying trees -- apple, persimmon, walnut, maple -- produce two or three times as many seeds as normal during their last seasons.
Find something to do that interests you.

Offline grassfed

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Re: Sugar maple invasion
« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2016, 06:50:04 pm »
I manage my woods for timber production but I can tell you that there is no conflict whatsoever between good timber management  (in my area) and good wildlife management. I constantly cut different areas around my 350 -+ acres that are wooded. I usually work a 5-10 acre area depending on what stage it is in. I have so much wildlife it is not funny: Bear, Moose, Deer, Fisher, Coywolf Owls turkey, eagles, hawks....I could go on it is very crowded on my land. One of the reasons I cut in so many different spots is so I will have fresh regen that will pull some of the browse stress off other areas and let them the advance regen progress. 
Mike

Offline Klunker

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Re: Sugar maple invasion
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2016, 11:11:30 pm »
yes, timber management does not have to conflict with wildlife management but in cases they do.

Like I mentioned I don't cut dead, diseased or dying trees. These trees provide alot wildlife food/shelter/nesting situations. This is in conflict with managing for timber.

I rarely cut large "wolf" trees, I prefer the larger trees for mast, shelter and just cause I like them. This conflicts with managing for timber.

I cut smaller more common trees. To release other rarer (in my small 26 acre woodlot) or more desired trees. Most the trees I cut are in the 12" or smaller range. This is why I cut Sugar maples first and foremost, they are everywhere. I do have quite a few large maples, again, den trees.

Wildlife often causes problems. Deer make regeneration of many species almost impossible. Do a experiment. Fence off a 20 x 20 area so deer can't get in there. After 2-3 years look at the difference of plants in and out of the fencing. Not just trees but shrubs and forbs.

I spent about 4 hours Monday afternoon planting BloodRoot seed that my woodlot is missing. I'll also be transplanting trillium, bloodroot and hepatica later this summer along with seeding Jack in the pulpit. I'm always looking for native plants that I can add to my woodlot.

I've got about 3 acres that I cleared of small ash, box elder, shagbark hickory and elm that I'm going to replant with native grasses and prairie forbs. More diversity of native stuff. pith poor forestry management but better for wildlife diversity.

Nothing right or wrong with either type of management. Heck, nothing wrong with doing nothing and letting it all go.
I like coming to this site and learning about forestry. The people are great, the info is great and its about trees, what more can a guy ask for?