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Author Topic: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.  (Read 7381 times)

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Offline Darrel

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Re: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.
« Reply #40 on: January 06, 2016, 07:34:32 pm »
Obsidian can be gathered on Modoc National Forest in California.
1992 LT40HD

The winds of change are blowing at hurricane force and I don't like it but good shall come even though I see not how.

Offline ten_mile

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Re: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.
« Reply #41 on: January 29, 2016, 07:03:13 am »
I have been growing shiitake mushrooms on oak logs. The logs will produce mushrooms for about 5 years. I'll be starting a new batch this spring. I have also tried growing a few other varieties of mushrooms on logs. I had moderate success with cultivated oyster mushrooms and poor results with the other species I tried. The shiitakes are rather easy.

Offline JBlain

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Re: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.
« Reply #42 on: January 30, 2016, 09:05:51 pm »
I have been doing Shiitake mushrooms on oak and hard maple bolts for a few years now.  Just for fun.  The oldest daughter loves helping.  I cut a few hundred bolts and we usually have a big day with food and friends and everyone helps and takes some home.  I also supply a friend who grows them for sale commercially.  All my harvesting concentrates on thinning from below and removing the junk.  The junk grows great mushrooms.  We grow oysters on wheat straw in plastic bags with holes in it with success.
Josh

Offline 51cub

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Re: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.
« Reply #43 on: January 30, 2016, 09:16:40 pm »
Another mention for pine straw. Beekeepers burn it in their smokers
I like anything that's old, and mechanical, agricultural, or industrial. Old mills, machine shops, beekeeping, sugarmaking, blacksmithing, whitesmithing, woodworking

Offline AfraidChocker

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Re: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.
« Reply #44 on: February 25, 2016, 07:27:03 am »
Black spruce branches can be boiled in water and made into a low grade beer

The bark off Eastern Hemlock was once taken off the tree and used to tan hides. (In fact whole trees would be felled, stripped of their bark and the whole tree left to rot in the woods because it was not good for anything else back then).

In my house I have slate that I found while clearing forest back into fields. It too can be sold for profit.
As a sheep farmer, I have no intentions of arriving at the pearly gates in a well preserved body, rather I am going to slide into heaven sideways with my Kubota tractor, kick the manure out of my muck boots, and loudly proclaim, "Whoo Hoo, another Sheppard has just arrived!"

Offline AfraidChocker

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Re: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.
« Reply #45 on: March 07, 2016, 03:51:10 pm »
From white spruce they use to make gum.

From White Spruce they used to extract the gum and then refine it into oil (there was a plant in 1907 in Benton NH)

Hackmatack stumps can be dig up, their main roots used for "knees" in the building of ships.

White birch has been used for eons for a paper substitute

White Birch has been used in the making of canoes by the Indians

Forked birch saplings can be used for boot jacks

As a sheep farmer, I have no intentions of arriving at the pearly gates in a well preserved body, rather I am going to slide into heaven sideways with my Kubota tractor, kick the manure out of my muck boots, and loudly proclaim, "Whoo Hoo, another Sheppard has just arrived!"

Offline ppine

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Re: Harvest from the woods other than from logs.
« Reply #46 on: June 08, 2016, 05:33:12 pm »
We used to sell Cascara bark to pharmaceutical supply houses when I was in school.
Forester